Miscellaneous Bristol County, Massachusetts Obituaries

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Louise Maynard
WAREHAM -- Louise (Buckley) Maynard, 82, of West Wareham, died Friday, July 26, 1996, after a brief illness. She was the widow of Wallace Maynard and daughter of the late Frank and Margaret (Heap) Buckley.
She died at the Falmouth Nursing Home in Falmouth.
Born in New Bedford, she moved to Wareham in the mid-1930s and has been a resident since then. She was a homemaker.
Survivors include a son, Edward D. Maynard of Carver; a sister, Marion Sutton of Beaumont, Texas; two grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren.
Arrangements are by the Stott, Chapman, Cole & Gleason Funeral Home, 2599 Cranberry Highway.

Joan K. Miller
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- Joan K. Miller, 45, died Friday, July 19, 1996, after a brief bout with cancer. She was the wife of Dirk D. Miller of Bowling Green, Ky., and daughter of Austin P. and Gwendolyn W. (Paul) Skinner.
She died at the Vanderbilt Medical Center.
Born in New Bedford, she graduated from Fairhaven High School and worked at Continental Screw Co., moving to Chicago with the company.
While in New Bedford, she attended Grace Episcopal Church.
Survivors include two sisters, her twin, Jane E. Garcia of Fairhaven, and Susan W. Lopes of Acushnet; two brothers, Paul A. Skinner of Fairhaven and David A. Skinner of New Bedford; 10 nieces and nephews; and a grandniece and grandnephew.
Arrangements were by the J.C. Kirby & Son Funeral Chapel, 832 Broadway, Bowling Green, Ky.

George S. Gesualdo
ROCHESTER -- George S. Gesualdo, 63, died at home Saturday, July 27, 1996, after a long illness. He was the husband of Marguerite D. "Margo" (Welsh) Gesualdo and son of the late Joseph and Rosa (Caiati) Gesualdo.
He was born in Mt. Vernon, N.Y., and lived in Taunton and New Bedford before moving to Rochester 13 years ago.
He operated Merit Temperature Control on Staten Island until his retirement. Locally, he installed custom tile and raced greyhounds.
In 1985, Mr. Gesualdo ran an unsuccessful campaign for a seat on the Rochester School Committee.
Mr. Gesualdo was a Korean War Marine Corps veteran and was a sergeant upon separation. He was an avid golfer and gardener and enjoyed playing cards and raising his Airedale Terriers.
He was a former member of the Portuguese American Citizen's Club in Taunton and a former member of the Lakeville Eagles.
Survivors include his widow; a son, Guy T. Gesualdo of Lake Tahoe, Nev.; six sisters; two brother; and several nieces and nephews.
Arrangements are by the Rock Funeral Home, 1285 Ashley Blvd.

Agnes T. Clement
FAIRHAVEN -- Agnes T. Clement, 85, died Saturday, July 27, 1996, after a long illness. She was the daugher of the late Manuel and Mary (Thomas) Clement.
She died at Our Lady's Haven Nursing Home.
Born in New Bedford, she lived in Fairhaven since 1939 and was a parishioner of St. Joseph Church.
She was employed by Morse Twist Drill as a final inspector and was a member of the V.F.W. Ladies Auxiliary, Fairhaven Post.
Survivors include a brother, George Clement of New Bedford; a sister, Laura Openshaw of New Bedford; and several nieces and nephews.
She was the sister of the late Laurian T. Clement and the late Joseph Clement.
Arrangements are by the Fairhaven Funeral Home, 117 Main St.

Isabel Cruz
PORT CHARLOTTE, Fla. -- Isabel (DaLuz) Cruz, 80, of Deerfield Avenue, died Thursday, July 25, 1996. She was the wife of James T. Cruz and daughter of the late Jacinto and Gloria (Medeiros) DaLuz.
She died at Fawcett Memorial Hospital.
Born in Ponta Del gada, Sao Miguel, Azores, she lived in New Bedford for many years and Bristol, R.I., for 57 years, before moving to Port Charlotte six years ago.
She was employed by the former Best Made Dress Co. in Warren, R.I., for many years until her retirement.
Survivors include her widower; a daughter, Theresa Ramos of Port Charlotte; a brother, Manuel Luiz of Thomasville, Ga.; a sister, Diana Borges of Assonet; four grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.
She was the mother of the late James Cruz and James Cruz and sister of the late Mary Niclou, Margaret DaLuz, Sophie DaLuz, Adeline Teixeira and Bertha Costa.
Arrangements are by the George C. Lima Funeral Home, 367 High St., Bristol, R.I.

Dr. Samuel A. Kirk
Dr. Samuel A. Kirk, an immigrant homesteader's son who became so intrigued by his childhood experiences teaching illiterate farmhands to read that he went on to an acclaimed career as the father of special education -- a term he coined in 1963 -- died July 21 at his retirement home in Tucson, Ariz. He was 92.
Mr. Kirk did his pioneering work as the founding director of the Institute for Research on Exceptional Children at the University of Illinois, a position he held both before and after he served as director of the Office of Education's Division of Handicapped Children in 1963 and 1964.
In an era when what is known by statute as "free, appropriate public education" for all children is a right mandated by federal law, it is easy to forget how things were when Mr. Kirk began his professional career in 1929.
Recently graduated from the University of Chicago, he became a counselor at an institution for mentally handicapped teen-age delinquents in Chicago and later at a training school near Ann Arbor, where he obtained a doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Michigan in 1935.
There were some programs for the mentally retarded at the time, but they were often little more than custodial, and there were none for other children whose special needs had not even been recognized.
Kirk's observations and insights at those early jobs informed his later research, which among other things led to his discovery that many failing students who were clearly not retarded nevertheless suffered from various neurological disorders and could be helped by specific regimens of training.
Over the next 60 years Kirk wrote so widely and so authoritatively on so many aspects of mental retardation learning disorders and was responsible for so many innovations in diagnosis, training and social policy that it is not hard to understand why a former colleague, William C. Healey, once suggested he was "the last of the great generalists" in his field.
Kirk's most influential pronouncement was a speech he delivered to an education conference in 1963, when he coined and defined the term "learning disabilities."
The speech had a galvanizing effect on his profession and social policy. Kirk, whose pioneering work had already earned an award from a Kennedy family foundation, was named to the federal post by President John F. Kennedy, who had a sister who was mentally retarded.
Although he is widely credited with laying the groundwork for a succession of laws requiring schools to provide help for children with learning disabilities, what many regard as Kirk's most visionary contribution to public policy occurred in 1964, when he persuaded the administration and Congress to begin providing financing to train teachers to provide the expert help such children needed.
Those who knew him longest suggested Wednesday that for Kirk's soaring accomplishments and for all the prominent educators he taught, he was merely continuing a childhood impulse.
One of nine children of Lebanese immigrants, Kirk was born on a wheat farm outside Rugby, N.D., and grew up on a farm across the Canadian border.
It was there, his younger brother, Victor, recalled Saturday, that on rainy days the farmhands who slept in the loft would shun the pool table installed in the barn and would gather instead around his older brother as he gave them lessons in reading.
"He had patience," Mr. Kirk said. "He had a knack for instruction."
In addition to his brother, of Sacramento, Calif., Kirk is survived by his wife, Winnifred; a son, Jerry, of Dana Point, Calif.; a daughter, Lorraine Kirk of Laguna Beach, Calif.; two sisters, Hannah Wilson of Tucson and Margie, of Lethbridge, Alberta, and a granddaughter, Shenna Fitzgerald of Seattle.

Beatrice Marshall
NEW BEDFORD -- Beatrice Marshall, 76, of North Dartmouth, died Sunday, July 28, 1996, after a brief illness. She was the widow of Joseph Marshall and daughter of the late Julia (Enos) and Frank Pacheco, better known as "Frankie Britt."
She died at St. Luke's Hospital.
She was born in New Bedford and lived most of her life in Dartmouth, where she was a communicant of St. Julie Billiart Church. She was a graduate of New Bedford High School.
She was formerly employed by the Jewish Community Center and the Jewish Welfare Federation as an office manager until her retirement.
Mrs. Marshall came out of retirement to assist in the publication of Senior Scope Magazine.
Survivors include a daughter, Rebecca Marshall-Howarth of Attleboro; two sisters, Hilda Pacheco of New Bedford and Irene Taylor of Pepperill; a granddaughter; and several nieces and nephews.
Arrangements are by the Perry Funeral Home, 111 Dartmouth St., New Bedford.

William N. Whelan Jr.
NEW BEDFORD -- William N. Whelan Jr., 80, died at home Sunday, July 28, 1996, after a long illness. He was the husband of Mary L. (Law) Whelan and son of the late William N. and Elizabeth (Toner) Whelan.
He was a lifelong resident of New Bedford and a communicant of St. Mary Church.
He was formerly employed by the New Bedford Gas & Edison Light Company for 40 years as a foreman in the line department until his retirement in 1979.
He was a graduate of Holy Family High School and was a member of the Stetson Club and the Com/Energy Retirees. He was a life member of the Knights of Columbus McMahon Council 151 and the Humberto Cardinal Medeiros Assembly 4th Degree.
He also was one of the founders of the New Bedford Gas & Edison Light Company Blood Bank.
Mr. Whelan enjoyed fishing and traveling. He and his wife were married for 56 years.
Survivors include his widow; two sons, William N. Whelan III of New Bedford and David L. Whelan of Plymouth; a daughter, Marilu Smith of Rochester; five grandchildren; and a great-grandson.
He was the brother of the late Mary E. Whelan, Frances J. Whelan, Alexander W. Whelan and John J. Whelan.
Arrangements are by the Saunders-Dwyer Home for Funerals, 495 Park St.

Lee A. Lescaze, 57
NEW YORK -- Lee Adrien Lescaze, the weekend editor of The Wall Street Journal and a former assistant managing editor of The Washington Post, died Friday night at his home in New York City. He was 57.
The cause was lung cancer, said his wife, Lynn Darling, a senior writer at Esquire magazine.
Mr. Lescaze was born in New York to William Lescaze, an architect, and the former Mary Hughes. He attended the Dalton School and graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy and Harvard University.
He joined The Washington Post as a copyboy in 1963 and went on to be a reporter, an editor on the foreign desk and a correspondent in Saigon and later in Hong Kong. He was The Post's foreign editor in 1973 and 1974 and its national editor from 1975 to 1977. After reporting from New York and then the White House, he was The Post's assistant managing editor in charge of its style section.
In 1983 he joined The Wall Street Journal and became foreign editor in 1989 and weekend editor in 1994. In that post, he started a Friday sports page, a Friday travel page and a Friday residential real estate page.

Dorothy I. Mason
WARWICK, R.I. -- Dorothy I. (Curtis) Mason, 79, of Homeland Avenue, died at home Saturday, July 27, 1996, after an illness. She was the wife of Earle N. Mason Sr. and daughter of the late Henry G. and Louise (Barrett) Curtis.
She was born in Providence and lived in Warwick since 1927.
She was employed by the Ballou Manufacturing Company, E.A. Adams Manufacturing Company and the Coro Manufacturing Company as a jewelry worker until her retirement in 1960.
Mrs. Mason was a member of the former Bayside Fire Company Auxiliary.
Survivors include her widower; two sons, Earl N. Mason Jr. of Westport and Henry J. Mason of Escondido, Calif.; a daughter, Louise R. Norcliffe of Warwick; 10 grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren.
She was the grandmother of the late Brenda Lee Mason.
Arrangements are by the Urquhart-Murphy Funeral Home, 800 Greenwich Ave.

Bruce L. Fleurent
NEW BEDFORD -- Bruce Leo Fleurent, 32, of Fairhaven, died unexpectedly, Saturday, July 27, 1996. He was the son of Leo Fleurent Jr. and Rochelle (Gauthier) Fleurent.
He died at St. Luke's Hospital.
Born in New Bedford, he lived in Fairhaven most of his life. He was a graduate of Fairhaven High School class of 1983.
He was the co-owner and operator of R & B Air of Fairhaven with his brother Randall for the past 10 years.
Mr. Fleurent was a former member of the Livesey Club in Fairhaven and was a communicant of St. Mary Church.
Survivors include his parents; two sisters, Lynne Sylva and Nicole Santos of Fairhaven; two brothers, Michael Fleurent and Randall Fleurent of Fairhaven; his paternal grandparents, Sophie Pitta of Fairhaven and Leo Fleurent Sr. of New Bedford; two nieces; and six nephews.
Arrangements are by the Fairlawn Mortuary, 180 Washington St.

Stella A. Bures
NEW BEDFORD -- Stella A. (Gavlick) Bures, 82, died Sunday, July 28, 1996, after a long illness. She was the wife of Frank Bures and daughter of the late Walter and Katherine (Kulik) Gavlick.
She died at Mediplex of New Bedford.
She was born in Central Falls, R.I., and lived in New Bedford most of her life.
Mrs. Bures and her husband were married for 61 years and were daily communicants of Holy Name Church.
She was a member of the Holy Name 121 Club.
Survivors include her widower; three sons, Frank Bures Jr. of Isle of Palms, S.C., John J. Bures of Rome, N.Y. and Richard P. Bures of New Bedford; six sisters, Cecilia Ney, Blanche LaFontaine, Sophie Bures, Ann Gavlick, Ida Gavlick and Josephine Mungo; a brother, Paul Gavlick; eight grandchildren; and two great-granddaughters.
She was also the mother of the late Barbara Ann Beldon and Constance Mary Barth.
Arrangements are by the Saunders-Dwyer Home for Funerals, 495 Park St.

Archibald Cadieux
FAIRHAVEN -- Archibald "Archie" Adrien Cadieux, 79, of Acushnet died Monday, July 29, 1996, at the Nichols House Nursing Home. He was the widower of Doris M. (Taylor) Cadieux and son of the late Henry and the late Rose (Frappier) Cadieux.
Born in New Bedford, he lived in Acushnet since 1969. He was a communicant of St. Mary's Church and was formerly employed by the Acushnet Company, Rubber Division as a machinist.
He was a member of the Acushnet Rod & Gun Club and enjoyed repairing small engines and lawnmowers in his leisure time.
Survivors include a daughter, Annie O. Ferreira of New Bedford; a sister, Alma Lubeira of Springfield; a granddaughter, Courtney Ferreira of New Bedford, and nieces and nephews.
Arrangements are by the Rock Funeral Home, 1285 Ashley Blvd., New Bedford.

Mary G. Davidson
ROCKAWAY, N.Y. -- Mary G. (Purtell) Davidson, 82, formerly of Middleboro, died Monday, July 29, 1996, at New Surfside Nursing Home after a lengthy illness. She was the widow of the Philip H. Davidson.
Born in Middleboro, she was the daughter of the late Charles and Edith (Gove) Purtell.
She moved from Middleboro to New York after her husband died to live with her daughter.
While living in Middleboro, she was a communicant of Sacred Heart Church in Middleboro and a member of the Middleboro Eagles Auxiliary.
Survivors include two sons, William Oden of New York and Arthur Oden of Taunton; two daughters, Connie Joyce of Las Vegas and Mary E. Green of Flushing, N.Y.; 12 grandchildren and several great-grandchildren. She also was the mother of the late Shirley Tibball.
Arrangements are by Egger Funeral Home, 61 Pearl St., Middleboro.

Carole F. Howland
NEW BEDFORD -- Carole Fairman Howland, 54, died unexpectedly Sunday, July 28, 1996, at St. Luke's Hospital.
She was the wife of the late Frederick Howland.
Born in Buffalo, N.Y., Mrs. Howland was the daughter of the Rev. William A. Fairman and the late Erma (Lebo) Fairman.
She lived in Buffalo for several years before moving to Hamden, Conn., and graduated from Hamden High School. She moved to New Bedford in the late 1950s
Mrs. Howland was a communicant of Trinity Lutheran Church in Fairhaven and of the former St. John's Lutheran Church in New Bedford.
In addition to her father, she is survived by a brother, Robert Fairman of Wallkill, N.Y., several children she helped raise, and a grandchild.
Arrangements are by Wilson Chapel, 479 County St.

Whitman W. Higgins
WAREHAM -- Retired U.S. Army Maj. Whitman Winsor Higgins died Friday, July 26, 1996, at the Star of David Nursing Home in West Roxbury after a lengthy illness. He was 78.
He was the husband of Ruth E. (Freeman) Higgins.
Born in Boston to the late Andrew W. and Louise (Wilbur) Higgins, he was raised in South Middleboro and spent the last 20 years in West Wareham.
He was a graduate of Middleboro Memorial High School and Bristol County Agricultural School.
A career Army man, he served in World War II with the Third Army as a staff sergeant in the European Theater and in the Korean War as a first lieutenant.
Assigned to the 486th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion, he saw action from the beaches of Normandy to within 40 miles of Berlin.
He was awarded several decorations, including the World War II Victory Medal and the Middle East Theater Service Medal with five battle stars.
In November 1944, Mr. Higgins' parents received a box of souvenirs from their son, then serving in France.
"The gayest sourvenir is a red banner, which unfolds to a length of 16 feet and a width of 5 feet. Its central figure is a bold swastika design. It was a trophy from an armored German car, knocked out by the sergeant's unit," reads the yellowing newspaper clipping.
Mr. Higgins spent 19 months in Korea, receiving the Bronze Star with three stars, the Korean Service Medal with four battle stars, the United Nations Service Medal and other citations.
He was discharged from active service in May 1953 and performed National Guard duty with the 685th Battalion as battery commander of Headquarters Battery in Buzzards Bay until his retirement in 1965 at the rank of major.
In civilian life, Mr. Higgins was a deputy master at the Plymouth County Jail.
"He was very precise and profession and a kind of by-the-book guy. He was a gentleman," remembered John F. Prentice, a farm superintendent for the Plymouth County Sheriff's Department.
He was a member of South Middleboro Methodist Church, a life member of Nickerson Post #64, American Legion of Middlelbor, a life member of Wankinquoh Rod and Gun Club of Wareham, a life member of the 486th Gun Battalion Association and a member of the Massachusetts Police Association.
Survivors include his wife, a daughter, Linda C. Mitchell of Virginia Beach, Va.; three grandchildren and three great grandchildren. He was the brother of the late Dura W. Higgins.
Arrangements are by the Egger Funeral Home, Middleboro.

Robert Pereira
NEW BEDFORD -- Private services were held Monday for Robert "Bobby" Pereira, 41, who died Thursday, July 25, 1996, at St. Luke's Hospital after a long illness.
He was the son of Dorothy (Piva) Souza and Sylvester Pereira of Hopedale.
A communicant of Holy Name Church, Mr. Pereira was a self-employed carpenter.
He served in the U.S. Army from 1976-1980.
Survivors include his parents; a daughter, Melissa Nichols of Canyon Lake, Texas; a brother, James S. Pereira of Florida; a special cousin, Sharon Miller of New Bedford; and several nieces, nephews and cousins.
Mr. Pereira was brother of the late Joseph Pereira and step-son of the late Antone G. Souza, also known as "Tony Dawson."
Arrangements were by Saunders-Dwyer Home for Funerals, 495 Park St., New Bedford.

Elise H. Fallow
MARION -- Elise H. (Holt) Fallow died at home Thursday, July 25, 1996, after a long illness. She was the wife of John S. "Jack" Fallow Jr.
Born in New York, she was the daughter of the late Henry and Elizabeth (Cabot) Holt and spent much time at her parents' home on Mt. Vernon Street on Boston's Beacon Hill.
Mrs. Fallow was educated at the Oldfield Boarding School in Baltimore and graduated from Bennington College in Vermont.
She lived in Westport before moving to Marion in 1956.
Mrs. Fallow was a talented artist, gifted in portrait painting and well-known in the area for that expertise.
She was a member of the Kittansett Club of Marion and the Chilton Club in Boston.
Besides her husband, she is survived by a son, John S. Fallow III of Bangor, Maine; two daughters, Sylvia F. Brewster of Austin, Texas, and Georgia F. McDonald of Marion; and five grandchildren.
Arrangements are by the Wilson Chapel, 479 County St., New Bedford.

Maude Denault
LAS VEGAS -- Services were held Monday for Maude (Harrison) Denault, 84, formerly of New Bedford, who died Wednesday, July 24, 1996.
She was the widow of Clifton A. Denault. Mrs. Denault was born in New Bedford and was an office worker in the textile industry before her retirement.
She is survived by a daughter, Corena Hoffman of Las Vegas; two grandsons; five nephews; and one brother.
She was buried today at Memory Gardens Cemetery.
Arrangements were by Desert Memorial Cremation and Burial Society, Las Vegas.

Herbert Wilkinson Jr.
SOMERSET -- Herbert S. Wilkinson Jr., 76, of Vermont Avenue, died Sunday, July 28, 1996, at Rose Hawthorne Lathrop Home after a brief illness.
He was the widower of Mary Thelma (Timerlake) Wilkinson and son of the late Herbert S. and the late Caroline (Blackburn) Wilkinson.
Born in Fall River, he lived in Somerset for the past 30 years. Before that, he lived on Globe Street in Fall River for more than 18 years.
Mr. Wilkinson graduated from BMC Durfee High School in Fall River and earned a degree from the Durfee Technical Institute.
Mr. Wilkinson was employed for 37 years as an electronic technician for the Naval Undersea Systems Center in Newport, R.I., retiring in 1977. He was a World War II Air Force veteran.
Survivors include two sons, Herbert S. Wilkinson III of North Dartmouth and Joe Wilkinson of Texas; one daughter, Carolyn T. Racette of Little Compton, R.I.; and nine grandchildren.
He also was the brother of the late Bertha Allison.
Arrangements are by the "Cherry Place" home of Waring-Ashton & Coughlin -- D.D. Sullivan-Driscoll, 178 Winter St., Fall River.

Maria G. Torres
DARTMOUTH -- Maria Gloria (Amaral) Torres, 85, died Sunday, July 28, 1996, after a long illness.
She was the widow of Manuel J. Torres and daughter of Manuel Caetano and Maria Hortencia (deSousa) Amaral.
She died at Brandon Woods Nursing Home.
Mrs. Torres was born in Achadinha, Azores and live for the past 40 years in New Bedford.
A deeply devout Catholic, Mrs. Torres was a communicant of Immaculate Conception Church, where she frequently attended masses.
She worked as an examiner at Cliftex Corp. until her retirement.
Survivors include two sons, Norberto M. Torres and Arthur M. Torres, both of New Bedford; three daughters, Cezeltina Rebelo of New Bedford, Mary August Garcia of Dartmouth and Isaura Pacheco of Acushnet; a sister, Isaura daConceicao Amaral of Portugal; 10 grandchildren, 15 great-grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.
Mrs. Torres also was grandmother of the late Michael Garcia.
Arrangements are by Rock Funeral Home, 1285 Ashley Boulevard, New Bedford.

Jandira S. Silva, 96
FREMONT, Calif. -- Jandira Simaria Silva, 96, of Fremont, formerly of New Bedford, died at home Sunday, July 28, 1996, after a long illness. The widow of Joao A. Silva, she was the daughter of the late Francisco Xavier and Matilda Simaria.
Born in Horta, Faial, Portugal, she lived in New Bedford for many years before moving to California. She was employed as a stitcher for Abetta Sportswear in New Bedford until her retirement.
Survivors include a son, John Simaria of California, formerly of New Bedford; a daughter, Hilda Silva of California, also formerly of New Bedford; four grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.
Arrangements are by the Chapel of the Roses, 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont.

Clarence M. Shaw, 90
MIDDLEBORO -- Clarence M. Shaw, 90, of Middleboro, died Monday, July 29, 1996, at Good Samaritan Hospital in Brockton after a lengthy illness.
He was the widower of Rose Ana J. (Asselin) Shaw.
He was the son of the late Mason and Bertha M. (Crocker) Shaw. He was a lifelong resident of Middleboro.
Survivors include one sister, Gladys M. Crowther of Middleboro, and serveral nieces and nephews.
Arrangements are by the Ashley Funeral Home, 35 Oak St., Middleboro.

William A. Mixter
PROVIDENCE -- William A. Mixter, 76, of Westport, who was serving with the Navy at Pearl Harbor when the Japanese attacked in 1941, died Sunday, July 28, 1996, after a long illness.
He was the widower of Doris A. (Boudria) Boothroyd-Mixter.
Son of the late George A. Mixter and Sadie (Neely) Mixter, he was born in Cleveland and had been a Westport resident for the past 15 years.
He died at Rhode Island Hospital.
Mr. Mixter was employed as a boiler operator at the former Kerr Mill in Fall River before his retirement.
He served in the Navy for 20 years, including service on several ships, in Hawaii and on Bikini Island, where he took part in military experiments on the atomic bomb from 1944-1946.
Survivors include a brother, George Mixter of Palmer, Ohio; several children and step-children, several grandchildren and great-grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.
Arrangements are by the Potter Funeral Home, 81 Reed Road, Westport.

James T. Marrow, 92
BROCKTON -- James T. Marrow, 92, of Brockton, died unexpectedly at home Sunday, July 28, 1996.
He was the son of the late Thomas and Anne (Costello) Marrow.
Born in Whitman, he lived in Brockton most of his life and attended Lincoln Congregational Church. He was employed by the Avon Sole Co. of Avon.
He was a World War II Army veteran.
Survivors include a son, James T. Pierce of Wareham; a brother, John Marrow of Brockton; three grandchildren, two great-grandchildren and several nieces, nephews, and cousins.
Arrangements are by the Greene Funeral Home, 103 Green St., Brockton.

Mary Rose Couto-Cardoza
NEW BEDFORD -- Mary Rose (Medeiros) Couto-Cardoza, 81, of New Bedford, died unexpectedly Sunday, July 28, 1996, at St. Luke's Hospital. She was the wife of Antone Cardoza and the widow of Carlos Couto.
Born in Seekonk, she was the daughter of the late Jose and Mary (Barboza) Medeiros. She lived most of her life in New Bedford where she was employed as an inspector for local garment manufacturers.
A communicant of Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church, she was a past president of the Ladies Auxiliary of the American Portuguese War Veterans. She also was a member of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union.
Survivors include her widower,; two sons, Donald Couto of New Bedford and Carl K. Couto of Acushnet; a daughter, Carlene B. Stinnette of Gales Ferry, Ct.; two stepsons, Ronald D. Dumais and Daniel J. Cardoza, both of Cape Coral, Fla.; her stepmother, Alice Medeiros of New Bedford; seven grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren.
She also also the sister of the late Antone Medeiros and Joseph Medeiros.
Arrangements are by the Latham Funeral Home, 823 Brock Ave.

William Underwood
William Underwood, architect, artist SOUTH DARTMOUTH -- William Julian Underwood, 76, of Nonquitt, died on Saturday, July 27, 1996, at home.
He was the husband of Suzanne (Stockard) Underwood and the son of the late William James and Helen (Rowan) Underwood.
Born in Belmont, Mr. Underwood practiced architecture with the firm of Tallman, LaBrode, Drake and Underwood, and was a sole practitioner. An Army veteran of WWII, he graduated from Harvard College in 1941 and received his Master of Architecture degree from the Harvard Graduate School of Design.
Mr. Underwood's paintings have been exhibited at the Old Dartmouth Historical Society, Friends Academy, The Crapo Gallery and the Dartmouth Art Gallery. He served on the board of the New Bedford Institution for Savings, and the Governor's Council for the Arts. Mr. Underwood also was a former director of the Old Dartmouth Historical Society, Friends Academy, the Crapo Foundation, The New Bedford Yacht Club and the Swain School of Design.
In 1968, Mr. Underwood was credited with saving a Dartmouth man caught in a fire. Mr. Underwood and his then 10-year-old daughter, Joan, went into the burning home and rescued an 85-year-old man.
He leaves his wife; a son, William J. Jr. of Westport; two daughters, Elizabeth Bertrand of Brookfield and Joan Lesley of Westport, Conn.; a sister, Helen U. Baker of Belmont; and five grandchildren. Services will be private.
A memorial exhibition of Mr. Underwood's paintings will be held at a later date.
Arrangements are by the Wilson Chapel, 479 County St., New Bedford.

Diane M. Bedard, 94
BOURNE -- Diane M. Bedard, 94, died Monday, July 29, 1996, after a brief illness.
She was the daughter of the late Stanislaus and Marie (Levesque) Bedard.
She died at the Bourne Manor.
Miss Bedard was born in Fall River and lived in New Bedford for 85 years. She moved to Bourne last year.
She was a communicant of St. Anthony Church in New Bedford and was a Child of Mary of her parish.
Miss Bedard worked as a cloth inspector at Wamsutta Mills until her retirement.
Survivors include a brother, Antonin Bedard of Fall River; a sister, Rita Desmarais of Hyannis; and several nieces and nephews.
Arrangements are by Chausse-Dumont Funeral Home, 1325 Acushnet Ave., New Bedford.

Roger Tory Peterson, 87
OLD LYME, Conn. -- Roger Tory Peterson, whose precisely drawn, easy-to-use field guides to wild birds taught millions to hunt with binoculars instead of the shotgun, creating a new national pastime, has died. He was 87.
Mr. Peterson died Sunday in his sleep at his home in Old Lyme, his personal secretary, Elaine Lillis, said yesterday. He had suffered a mild stroke several months ago, she said.
Regarded as a modern-day Audubon, Mr. Peterson combined artistic talent with a lifelong scientific interest in birds to fashion a glittering 60-year career during which he wrote, illustrated and edited 15 books that sold millions of copies and were translated into at least 12 languages.
Audubon magazine called him "the man who turned bird watching into a super sport."
"He brought nature to the everyday household, the everyday person," said James M. Berry, president of the Roger Tory Peterson Institute in Jamestown, N.Y., Peterson's birthplace.
"Before Peterson, books on natural history were generally written for the scientist, the researcher, or the university student," Mr. Berry said. "Today, it's a rare person that doesn't have a Peterson field guide at home on a shelf somewhere."
In "The Birder's Handbook," Paul Ehrlich wrote that Mr. Peterson's greatest contribution to the preservation of biological diversity was in getting millions of people outdoors with Peterson Field Guides in their pockets.
"In this century, no one has done more to promote an interest in living creatures than Roger Tory Peterson, the inventor of the modern field guide," Mr. Ehrlich wrote.
Mr. Peterson probably was the world's most knowledgeable bird watcher.
"I can recognize the calls of practically every bird in North America," he said in a 1993 interview at his Old Lyme home. "There are some in Africa I don't know, though."
He made 10 trips to East Africa to study birds. The studio in his home was filled with exotic tribal masks acquired on these trips.
His birding took him all over the world.
"I've been to Antarctica 17 times and four times to Australia," he said in 1993. "It's reached the point where I don't consider the United States to be travel, unless I go to Alaska."
He traced his abiding interest in birds to a mystical experience he had with an injured flicker when he was 11 years old.
"I thought it was dead. One moment it was just a bundle of brown feathers. Then, suddenly it exploded into life, and I was hooked," he recalled.
Born Aug. 28, 1908, Peterson said it was his seventh-grade science teacher who first encouraged him to draw birds and to apply his talent for meticulous detail.
"My teacher, Blanche Hornbeck, got me interested in drawing birds," he said. "I remember we were on a field trip and she made me draw a bird and liked what I did."
He soon was drawing, and later, photographing, every bird in sight. In the classroom, when no models were available, he would draw birds from memory on the margins of his school books.
He studied at the Art Student League in New York City and the National Academy of Design. He was teaching art and science in Massachusetts when William Vogt, the first editor of Audubon magazine, approached him about doing a pocket-sized guide for bird watchers.
The first field guide, published in 1934 and featuring the birds of the Eastern United States, was hailed as a masterpiece not only for the quality of the drawings but also for the unique Peterson identification system, which uses arrows to highlight distinctive markings and characteristics.
"It seems like an obvious thing to do now, but nobody had ever done that before," Peterson said.
His classic field guide has sold more than 4 million copies in four editions.
He subsequently helped create more than 40 guides covering a wide range of natural subjects, all published by Houghton Mifflin.
"Houghton Mifflin gave me my first break, and I always stayed with them," Peterson said.
"Several publishers had turned me down but Houghton Mifflin decided to take a chance on me. They initially brought out only 2,000 copies. They were all sold within a week, and the bookstores were calling for more. They had sold all of their copies within a week and had to go into a second printing."
His widow, Virginia Peterson, did the detailed maps in her husband's field guides.
Over the years, Peterson received 23 honorary degrees from American universities in areas of art, science, the humanities and letters. President Jimmy Carter awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom. He also served as art director at the National Wildlife Federation, education director and special consultant to the National Audubon Society and honorary chairman of the Roger Tory Peterson Institute in Jamestown.
Peterson continued to travel and to draw and photograph birds even as his health began to fail.
He was quite proud of his work and of the acclaim it received from his legions of admirers, many of whom considered him to be a latter-day John James Audubon.
"I consider myself to have been the bridge between the shotgun and the binoculars in bird watching," Peterson said. "Before I came along, the primary way to observe birds was to shoot them and stuff them."
He is survived by his wife, Virginia; two sons, Tory Peterson of Charlotte, N.C. and Lee Peterson of Lincoln, Pa.; a sister, Margaret Lager of Novato, Calif.; two stepdaughters, Linda Westervelt of Newport, R.I., and Miriam Westervelt of Waterford, Va.; a granddaughter, Ashley Peterson of Atlanta; and two step-grandchildren, Owen and Olivia Henry of Waterford, Va.
A funeral will be held at 2 p.m. Sunday at the Old Lyme Congregational Church. A memorial service will be held in Jamestown at a later date.
In lieu of flowers, the Peterson family asked that contributions be sent to the Roger Tory Peterson Institute at 311 Curtis St., Jamestown, N.Y. 14701.

Carole F. Howland
NEW BEDFORD -- Carole Fairman Howland, 54, died unexpectedly Sunday, July 28, 1996, at St. Luke's Hospital.
She was the wife of the late Frederick Howland.
Born in Buffalo, N.Y., Mrs. Howland was the daughter of the Rev. William A. Fairman and the late Erma (Lebo) Fairman.
She lived in Buffalo for several years before moving to Hamden, Conn., and graduated from Hamden High School. She moved to New Bedford in the late 1950s
Mrs. Howland was a communicant of Trinity Lutheran Church in Fairhaven and of the former St. John's Lutheran Church in New Bedford.
In addition to her father, she is survived by a brother, Robert Fairman of Wallkill, N.Y., several children she helped raise, and a grandchild.
Arrangements are by Wilson Chapel, 479 County St.

Jandira S. Silva, 96
FREMONT, Calif. -- Jandira Simaria Silva, 96, of Fremont, formerly of New Bedford, died at home Sunday, July 28, 1996, after a long illness. The widow of Joao A. Silva, she was the daughter of the late Francisco Xavier and Matilda Simaria.
Born in Horta, Faial, Portugal, she lived in New Bedford for many years before moving to California. She was employed as a stitcher for Abetta Sportswear in New Bedford until her retirement.
Survivors include a son, John Simaria of California, formerly of New Bedford; a daughter, Hilda Silva of California, also formerly of New Bedford; four grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.
Arrangements are by the Chapel of the Roses, 1940 Peralta Blvd., Fremont.

James T. Marrow, 92
BROCKTON -- James T. Marrow, 92, of Brockton, died unexpectedly at home Sunday, July 28, 1996.
He was the son of the late Thomas and Anne (Costello) Marrow.
Born in Whitman, he lived in Brockton most of his life and attended Lincoln Congregational Church. He was employed by the Avon Sole Co. of Avon.
He was a World War II Army veteran.
Survivors include a son, James T. Pierce of Wareham; a brother, John Marrow of Brockton; three grandchildren, two great-grandchildren and several nieces, nephews, and cousins.
Arrangements are by the Greene Funeral Home, 103 Green St., Brockton.

Elise H. Fallow
MARION -- Elise H. (Holt) Fallow died at home Thursday, July 25, 1996, after a long illness. She was the wife of John S. "Jack" Fallow Jr.
Born in New York, she was the daughter of the late Henry and Elizabeth (Cabot) Holt and spent much time at her parents' home on Mt. Vernon Street on Boston's Beacon Hill.
Mrs. Fallow was educated at the Oldfield Boarding School in Baltimore and graduated from Bennington College in Vermont.
She lived in Westport before moving to Marion in 1956.
Mrs. Fallow was a talented artist, gifted in portrait painting and well-known in the area for that expertise.
She was a member of the Kittansett Club of Marion and the Chilton Club in Boston.
Besides her husband, she is survived by a son, John S. Fallow III of Bangor, Maine; two daughters, Sylvia F. Brewster of Austin, Texas, and Georgia F. McDonald of Marion; and five grandchildren.
Arrangements are by the Wilson Chapel, 479 County St., New Bedford.

Mary Rose Couto-Cardoza
NEW BEDFORD -- Mary Rose (Medeiros) Couto-Cardoza, 81, of New Bedford, died unexpectedly Sunday, July 28, 1996, at St. Luke's Hospital. She was the wife of Antone Cardoza and the widow of Carlos Couto.
Born in Seekonk, she was the daughter of the late Jose and Mary (Barboza) Medeiros. She lived most of her life in New Bedford where she was employed as an inspector for local garment manufacturers.
A communicant of Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church, she was a past president of the Ladies Auxiliary of the American Portuguese War Veterans. She also was a member of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union.
Survivors include her widower,; two sons, Donald Couto of New Bedford and Carl K. Couto of Acushnet; a daughter, Carlene B. Stinnette of Gales Ferry, Ct.; two stepsons, Ronald D. Dumais and Daniel J. Cardoza, both of Cape Coral, Fla.; her stepmother, Alice Medeiros of New Bedford; seven grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren.
She also also the sister of the late Antone Medeiros and Joseph Medeiros.
Arrangements are by the Latham Funeral Home, 823 Brock Ave.


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