Miscellaneous Bristol County, Massachusetts Obituaries

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Jimmy Snyder
LAS VEGAS -- Jimmy "The Greek" Snyder, a self-styled oddsmaker and expert on sports who was fired as a CBS Sports commentator after making controversial remarks about black athletes, died Sunday at age 76.
He died of heart failure at Transitional Hospital Corp. after a long illness, longtime friend Tommy Manakides said.
"He fought like a champ. He tried to beat the odds of his life," Mr. Manakides said in a telephone interview.
Mr. Snyder turned oddsmaking into mainstream entertainment as part of CBS-TV's Sunday afternoon "NFL Today" pregame shows and became a popular personality.
That position fell apart, however, in 1988 when he said in a television interview that black athletes were bred to be superior to whites.
During the Civil War "the slave owner would breed his big black with his big woman so that he would have a big black kid," Mr. Snyder said. "That's where it all started."
Mr. Snyder also said that if blacks "take over coaching jobs like everybody wants them to, there's not to be anything left for the white people."
Later, Mr. Snyder said a black athlete was better that a white one because "he's been bred to be that way because of his thigh size and big size."
CBS Sports fired Snyder the next day.
"I am truly sorry for my remarks and once again I offer my heartfelt apology to all I may have offended," Mr. Snyder subsequently said.
Mr. Snyder, who spent 12 years on television, made headlines several years before his dismissal when he and "NFL Today" host Brent Musburger got into a brief fistfight at a midtown New York bar. They reportedly argued over the amount of airtime Mr. Snyder was getting from Mr. Musburger, who also was the show's managing editor.
An autobiography, "Wizard of Odds," is to be published next month, Mr. Manakides said.
Mr. Snyder, born Demetrios Georgios Synodinos in Steubenville, Ohio, is survived by his wife, Joan Snyder; two daughters, a son, a brother, two sisters and a grandson.

Anna E. Wilkinson
NEW BEDFORD -- Anna E. Wilkinson, 88, died unexpectedly Sunday, April 21, 1996. She was the daughter of the late Joseph V. and Maria (Fraga) Gracia.
She died at St. Luke's Hospital.
She was born in Dartmouth and lived most of her life in New Bedford.
She was a communicant of St. Mary Church, South Dartmouth.
She was formerly employed as a nanny in a doctor's home in New Bedford.
She was an active member of the Cerebral Palsy Council of Greater New Bedford from the 1950s through the 1970s.
Survivors include two daughters, Anne Farland of New Bedford and Betty Sylvia of Princeton; three sons, Walter David Wilkinson of Marion and Stephen A. Wilkinson and William H. Wilkinson, both of New Bedford; eight grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.
She was also the sister of the late Joseph Gracia, Maurice Gracia and Mary Gracia and the mother of the late Phillip S. Wilkinson.
Arrangements are by the Aubertine Funeral Home, 129 Allen St.

Maria A. De Sa
FALL RIVER -- Maria Adelaide (Branco) De Sa, 72, of 576 Mt. Hope Ave., died Saturday, April 20, 1996, after a long illness. She was the widow of Horacio H. De Sa and daughter of the late Antonio and Jorgina ( Soares-Macedo) Branco.
She died at Charlton Memorial Hospital.
Born in Fenais da Ajuda, Sao Miguel, Azores, she lived in Fall River for the past 27 years where she was a communicant of Santo Christo Church.
She was employed by the former Meritt Dress Co. in Fall River as a turner for 17 years.
Survivors include five sons, Antonio De Sa and Horacio De Sa, both of Fall River, Carlos A. De Sa of Somerset and Jose De Sa and Mario De Sa, both of North Dartmouth; two daughters, Adelaide Simas of North Dartmouth and Georgina Brum of Fall River; four sisters, Maria A. Araujo and Maria J. Melo, both of Fall River, and Isabel Mota and Carmen Caloura, both of Ontario, Canada; a brother, Manuel Moreira of Fall River; 13 grandchildren; a great-grandson; and several nieces and nephews.
Arrangements are by the Oliveira Funeral Home, 215 Columbia St.

Alice D. Savastano
WAREHAM -- Alice D. (Gallerani) Savastano, 82, died Saturday, April 20, 1996, after a brief illness. She was the wife of John J. Savastano of Wareham and the daughter of the late Louis and Delmina (Borghatti) Gallerani.
She died at Tobey Hospital.
Born in Wareham, she graduated from Wareham High School in 1932.
She was employed by the former McLellan Department Store of Wareham as a clerk as well as Howes Insurance Company of Wareham. She was also employed by Decas Cranberry Company as a screener for 20 years.
Survivors include her widower; a son, Jack J. Savastano of Wareham; two sisters, Annie Borghi of Wareham and Martina Driscoll of Attleboro; and several nieces and nephews.
Arrangements are by the Stott, Chapman, Cole & Gleason Funeral Home, 2599 Cranberry Highway.
Due to incorrect information received from the funeral home, the last name of Mrs. Savastano's parents and her son's middle initial were incorrect in the Sunday obituary.

Richard J. Levesque
FALL RIVER -- Richard J. Levesque, 74, of 271 Barnes St., died Sunday, April 21, 1996. He was the husband of Rhea C. (Roy) Levesque and son of the late Adelard J. and Elmire (Blais) Levesque.
He died at Charlton Memorial Hospital.
He was a lifelong resident of Fall River and a communicant of Notre Dame Church for the past 52 years. He was also a member of the Holy Name Society of the parish.
Mr. Levesque was a World War II Navy veteran and a member of the American Legion, Frank Allen Wilcox Post 126, Disabled American Veterans, and the L'Union Street Jean Baptiste.
Survivors include his widow; two sisters, Fabienne Patenaude of Fall River and Delores Vaughan of Warwick, R.I.; a brother, Roland J. Levesque of Warwick; and several nieces and nephews.
He was also the brother of the late Raymond J. Levesque.
Arrangements are by the Auclair Funeral Home, 690 S. Main St.

Mary I. Devine Yakey
DARTMOUTH -- Mary Ida Devine Yakey, 55, of South Dartmouth, formerly of East Providence, R.I., died Saturday, April 20, 1996, after an illness. She was the wife of James E. Yakey and daughter of the late Edward Michael and Ida C. (Clark) Devine.
She died at St. Luke's Hospital in New Bedford.
Born in Providence, she lived in South Dartmouth since 1986 and for most of her life in East Providence.
She was a communicant of Sacred Heart Church in East Providence and was active in the CYO.
She was a lifelong summer resident of South Dartmouth and a communicant of St. Mary Church.
She was employed by Baybank as a sales representative and head teller from 1987-1996. Prior to that, she was employed by Puritan Life Insurance Company from 1969-1985 and Weybosett Pure Food Markets from 1960-1969.
She was a graduate of East Providence High School and attended the University of Rhode Island as well as Bryant College.
Survivors include her widower; three stepsons, Thomas Yakey of Manville, R.I., Henry Yakey of Cranston, R.I., and James Yakey of South Dartmouth; two stepdaughters, Mary Elizabeth Stubbs of Cranston, R.I., and Linda Belle Yakey of South Dartmouth; a sister, Ann Devine Ferreira of South Dartmouth; four grandchildren; and a niece and a nephew.
Arrangements are by the Dartmouth Funeral Home, 230 Russells Mills Road.

Joseph V. Mello
WAREHAM -- Joseph Vass Mello, 51, of West Wareham, died Saturday, April 20, 1996, after a brief illlness. He was the son of Louise (Corey) Mello of Marion and the late Peter Vass Mello.
He died at the New England Medical Center in Boston.
He was a lifelong resident of Wareham and attended Wareham schools.
He was employed by Local 385 of New Bedford as a construction worker until his death.
Survivors include his mother; a loving friend, Judy Ford of West Wareham; two sisters, Frances Mello of Marion and Estella Sequeira of Stratford, Conn.; four brothers, Leroy Mello of Wayneville, Mo., Peter Vass Mello of New Bedford, Domingo Mello of Dennis and Antone Mello of Rochester Mills, Mich.
Arrangements are by Stott, Chapman, Cole & Gleason Funeral Home.

Christopher Robin (Milne) dies at 75
LONDON -- Christopher Robin Milne, immortalized as the young friend of Winnie the Pooh in the children's stories of his father, A.A. Milne, has died, the Times of London reported today. He was 75.
The newspaper said Christopher Robin Milne died on Saturday, but it did not say where he died or give the cause of death.
Mr. Milne was born in London in 1920, and was known as an adult to resent the melding of his real childhood and the fictional one in his father's tales.
In 1924, Alan Alexander Milne, already well-known for his light hand at literature and fiction, published a book of verse inspired by his four-year-old son, "When We Were Very Young."
His son's affection for a bear named Winnie at the London zoo became the model of hugely successful children's books -- "Winnie-the-Pooh" (1926), "Now We are Six" (1927), and "The House at Pooh Corner" (1928). The stories were later brought to film by Disney.
In photographs, it was clear how closely A.A. Milne modeled the fictional Christopher Robin on his son: the same wide, inquisitive brown eyes, the same carefully cropped mop top, the same gingham smock.
But the grown Christopher Milne displayed a tendency to counter his father's wishes: he dropped out of Cambridge in 1939 to enlist in the army; he was wounded in Italy during World War II.
He married his cousin Lesley de Selincourt in 1949 -- again, not his father's choice for his bride -- and became a bookseller, settling in Stoke Fleming on England's southwestern coast.
He endured countless parents pressing Pooh books into his hands and asking for an autograph; in return he asked for a donation for his favorite charity, Save the Children.
In private, he pursued his passion for carpentry, building special furniture for his daughter, who suffered from cerebral palsy.
His father died in 1956, and he remained silent about the effect of the series' immense popularity on his life until 1974, when he published "The Enchanted Places." It was followed by "The Path Through the Trees" in 1979 and "The Hollow on the Hill" in 1982.
Mr. Milne described his father as a man who used his small son's youth to stave off his own middle age. "When I was three, my father was three. When I was six, he was six ... he needed me to escape from being 50," he wrote.
He said his father kept his only child at a distance: "His heart remained buttoned up all through his life."
Christopher Robin Milne sought affection from his mother, writing, "Just as Rabbit said to Owl: 'You and I have brains, then others have fluff,' my mother had fluff."
He also resented the confusing of his childhood with popular legend: he could not remember whether it was the real or fictional Christopher Robin who invented the game of "pooh-sticks," dropping sticks from a wooden bridge into a flowing stream.
Nonetheless, he was not averse to exploiting his own name when he thought the cause was worthy: he backed campaigns against deforestation invoking the lands that housed his father's creations.
Besides Pooh, other characters were based on stuffed animals belonging to a childhood friend, Anne Darlington. In December, Darlington sold two of the toys, Kanga and Roo, at auction to a teddy bear museum.
He is survived by his wife and daughter. Funeral arrangements are not immediately known.

Mary L. Fournier
ACUSHNET -- Mary Lucy (Martin) Fournier, 84, died Sunday, April 21, 1996, after a brief illness. She was the widow of Gerard J. Fournier and the daughter of the late Joseph and Marie (Botelho) Martin.
She died at Alden Court Nursing Home.
She was born in Sao Miguel, Azores, Portugal, and lived most of her life in Fairhaven before moving to Acushnet to live with her daughter.
She was formerly employed by Micky Medann of New Bedford as a pocketbook manufacturer for 20 years until her retirement in 1971.
She was a member of St. Mary's Seniors and the Acushnet Nutrition Program.
Survivors include a daughter, Beverly Rezendes of Acushnet; a sister, Evelyn Rosa of Fairhaven; two grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.
Arrangements are by the Fairhaven Funeral Home, 117 Main St., Fairhaven.

Zora Arkus-Duntov
DETROIT -- Zora Arkus-Duntov, the automotive engineer known as the father of the Corvette, died yesterday. He was 86.
A Russian-born, German-trained engineer, he went to work for Chevrolet in 1953 -- the Corvette's first model year. He talked his way onto the Corvette team.
Mr. Arkus-Duntov, a race car driver, shaped the Corvette from a tame two-seater into a high-performance legend by 1956 and became the car's first chief engineer. "It's safe to say that without Zora Arkus-Duntov the vehicle as it is today would not be here," said William J. O'Neill, Jr., Chevrolet spokesman.
Mr. Arkus-Duntov's ingenuity brought several innovations to the Corvette that were later adopted by the rest of the auto industry, such as fuel-injection in 1957 and four-wheel disc brakes in 1965.
He retired from Chevrolet in the mid-1970s, but he continued to attend Corvette shows and events around the country, said Dean Schultz, a member of the National Corvette Museum board of directors.
Mr. Arkus-Duntov celebrated his 85th birthday at the museum in Bowling Green, Ky., the city where Corvettes are produced. A street near the museum was named in his honor.
He is survived by his wife, Elfi.

Erma Bombeck, at 69
SAN FRANCISCO -- Erma Bombeck, the housewife humorist whose wry take on suburban life -- from cleaning toilets to getting the kids to take out the trash -- earned her a wall of fame of yellowing columns on refrigerators across America, died Monday after a kidney transplant. She was 69.
"Erma Bombeck taught those of us who write columns that the funniest things are the things that our readers know the best -- houses, cars, kitchens and of course kids," fellow humor columnist Dave Barry said.
Ms. Bombeck died at a hospital in San Francisco, where she underwent a transplant earlier this month.
The titles of her books reveal her way of looking at the world: "I Lost Everything in the Postnatal Depression," "The Grass Is Always Greener Over the Septic Tank," "If Life Is a Bowl of Cherries, What Am I Doing in the Pits?" and "When You Look Like Your Passport Photo, It's Time to Go Home."
Ms. Bombeck began her column in 1965. It appeared twice a week in about 600 newspapers, including The Standard-Times, amusing readers with her gentle, self-deprecating humor.
Writing about her son's speed in the 100-yard dash, Ms. Bombeck said: "9.9! I figured it had to be nine days and nine hours. I once asked him to run the garbage out to the can and it sat by the sink until it turned into a bookend."
She used her light touch on more weighty issues, including that inevitable time when children leave home. "Wouldn't it be wonderful if parents could look at their teen-agers and say, 'I want you to stay, but you can't.' Wouldn't it be wonderful if teen-agers could look at their parents and say, 'I don't want to leave, but I must.' It's so much better to close the door gently on childhood than to slam it," she wrote in 1990.
Even with her success, Ms. Bombeck still did housework and wrote about shopping at discount stores, and she said she never forgot the excitement of earning $3 per column when she began her career.
"I can't let go of being a housewife," she told Life magazine. "You have to be part of it or you don't know what you're talking about. You've got to empty the garbage, swish out the toilet bowls. Doing the laundry keeps you humble."
Another expert on suburban living, "Hints From Heloise" author Ponce Cruse Evans, said Ms. Bombeck's insight into daily life was uncanny.
"I think all of us at one time or another, read her columns and said, 'That's my life. How did she know that?'" Heloise said. "I used to call her and say, 'Did you have a spy in my kitchen? Did my husband call you and tell you I do that?'
"She knew the joys and trials of our daily lives, yet she managed to say things with such hilarious humor that it all seemed OK."
Ms. Bombeck was diagnosed in 1992 with breast cancer and underwent a mastectomy. Shortly after that, her kidneys began failing from a hereditary disorder. She underwent dialysis four times a day at her home and went on a waiting list for a kidney transplant.
Doctors had diagnosed the kidney disorder, called adult polycystic kidney disease, in 1949.
She underwent the transplant early this month at the Medical Center of the University of California at San Francisco. The hospital said she died of complications following the transplant.
Ms. Bombeck was an Ohio housewife when she decided she would write a humor column about married life in the suburbs. Knowing the editors of the Dayton Journal Herald would not hire someone with no experience, she began writing for the editor's neighborhood newspapers in 1965.
Within a year, she was writing two columns a week for the Journal Herald, and a few weeks later, she was syndicated.
Ms. Bombeck also was a correspondent on ABC's "Good Morning America" for 11 years and wrote a short-lived 1980 television comedy, "Maggie."
"Most of my readers are housewives," Ms. Bombeck once said. "I'm saying, 'Hey, let's look at us! We've all been there. We're all in this mess together. Let's get some fun out of it."'
But she could turn serious, as in her book on children surviving cancer, "I Want to Grow Hair, I Want to Grow Up, I Want to go to Boise." The profits from the 1989 book were donated to cancer research -- three years before Ms. Bombeck was diagnosed with the disease.
Ms. Bombeck is survived by her husband of 47 years, Bill; a daughter, Betsy, and two sons, Matthew and Andrew.

Joseph Paiva, 91
FAIRHAVEN -- Joseph Paiva, 91, died at home Monday, April 22, 1996, after a brief illness. He was the widower of Anna (Marshall) Paiva and son of the late Manuel and Anna (Perreira) Paiva.
He was born in New Bedford and was a lifelong resident of the New Bedford/Fairhaven area. He was a parishioner of St. Mary's Church in Fairhaven. He was employed by Torres the Barber as a barber for 17 years until his retirement.
Mr. Paiva was a member of St. Mary's Golden Agers Club and the former San Antonio Club.
Survivors include a foster daughter, Alice Solomon of Freemont, Calif.; a sister, Rose Salvador of Middleboro; three foster grandchildren and three foster great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.
He was the foster father of the late Eva Dias and brother of the late Ernest Paiva.
Arrangements are by the Fairhaven Funeral Home, 117 Main St.

Anna E. Wilkinson
NEW BEDFORD -- Anna E. Wilkinson, 88, died unexpectedly Sunday, April 21, 1996. She was the daughter of the late Joseph V. and Maria (Fraga) Gracia.
She died at St. Luke's Hospital.
She was born in Dartmouth and lived most of her life in New Bedford. She was a communicant of St. Mary Church, South Dartmouth.
She was formerly employed as a nanny in a doctor's home in New Bedford.
She was an active member of the Cerebral Palsy Council of Greater New Bedford from the 1950s through the 1970s.
Survivors include two daughters, Anne Farland of New Bedford and Betty Sylvia of Princeton; three sons, Walter David Wilkinson of Marion and Stephen A. Wilkinson and William H. Wilkinson, both of New Bedford; a sister, Lillian Romanik of Palmer; eight grandchildren; six great-grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.
She was also the sister of the late Joseph Gracia, Maurice Gracia and Mary Gracia and mother of the late Phillip S. Wilkinson.
Arrangements are by the Aubertine Funeral Home, 129 Allen St.
Due to information received from the funeral home, Anna's sister was omitted in Monday's obituary.

Frank F. Micavicki
NEW BEDFORD -- Frank F. "Whitey" Micavicki, 78, died Sunday, April 21, 1996 after a long illness. He was the husband of the late Natalie (Rego) Micavicki and son of the late Joseph and Catherine (Vostroska) Micavicki.
He died at home.
Born in Wareham, he lived most of his life in New Bedford and was employed by various boatyards since 1949, retiring in 1980 from the Blue Water Yacht Company.
Mr. Micavicki was a World War II Army veteran and served at the Battle of the Bulge. He received the Victory Medal, the American Theater Ribbon and the European-African-Middle Eastern Theater Ribbon with three bronze stars for his tour of duty.
Survivors include a stepson, Garrett W. Silvia of New Bedford; a step grandson and a step great-granddaughter; several nieces and nephews.
Arrangements are by the Rock Funeral Home, 1285 Ashley Blvd.

Josephine E. Delano
NEW BEDFORD -- Josephine E. Delano, 75, died unexpectedly, Saturday, April 20, 1996. She was the widow of Lloyd S. Delano Jr. and daughter of the late William and Josephine (Johnson) Dupre.
She died at her son's home in Fairhaven.
A lifelong resident of New Bedford, she was a graduate of New Bedford High School.
Survivors include a daughter, June Guilbeault of Acushnet; two sons, Kenneth Delano of Asheville, N.C., and Bruce Delano of Fairhaven; seven grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.
Arrangements are by the Perry Funeral Home, 111 Dartmouth St.

Bruce W. Crocker
ONSET -- Bruce W. Crocker, 58, died unexpectedly Friday, April 19, 1996. He was the son of Margaret (Billard) and the late Richard I. Crocker Sr.
He died at Tobey Hospital in Wareham.
Born in Wareham, he attended Wareham schools.
He was employed by H.A. Maynard & Son Trucking of Onset as a truck driver for many years and most recently was employed by Otis Air Base in Bourne as a maintenance worker until his retirement in 1988.
Survivors include his mother; two sons, Bruce W. Crocker Jr. of Texas and David Crocker of Vermont; three brothers, Richard I. Crocker Jr. and Gene Crocker of Onset, and Glenn Crocker of N. Andover; two sisters, Patricia Crocker of Wareham and Janice Draper of Onset; and four grandchildren.
Arrangements are by the Stott, Chapman, Cole & Gleason Funeral Home, 2599 Cranberry Highway (Rt. 28), Wareham.

Virginia Sylvia-Cayer, 93
FREETOWN -- Virginia (Fontaine) Sylvia-Cayer, 93, died Monday, April 22, 1996. She was the wife of Jules L. Cayer and the widow of John M. Sylvia and daughter of the late Hormidas and Melanie (Plouffe) Fontaine.
She died at Our Lady's Haven.
She was born in New Bedford and lived in Freetown for about 37 years. She was a communicant of St. John Neumann Church and was a member of the Ladies Guild at the church.
She was also a member of L'Union Ste. Jean Baptiste No. 239.
Survivors include her widower; two daughters, Therese Kavanaugh of Dartmouth and Gabrielle Deane of Westchester, Pa.; two sons, Norman Cayer of New Bedford and John Cayer of Westport; a sister, Melanie Muir of New Bedford; 12 grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.
Arrangements are by the Donaghy Funeral Home, 465 County St., New Bedford.

Josephine O'Connell, 95
GREENFIELD -- Josephine L. (Yetter) O'Connell, 95, of 7 Myrtle St., died Monday, April 22, 1996. She was the daughter of the late John F. and Bridget (Lane) Yetter.
She died at the Buckley Nursing Home.
She was born in Greenfield and attended Greenfield High School and Greenfield Business College.
Ms. O'Connell was an assistant town clerk of Greenfield from 1946 to 1967 and was later elected to three terms as town clerk.
She was a communicant of Blessed Sacrament Church and a member of the Catholic Women's Council. She was also a past member of the Mass. Town Clerk's Association. She traveled extensively throughout Europe and enjoyed antiques.
Survivors include a son, Robert F. O'Connell of South Dartmouth; a daughter, Mary E. Perry of Lunenburg; 17 grandchildren; several great-grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.
She was also the mother of the late retired Capt. John D. O'Connell of the Massachusetts State Police, Barbara A. O'Connell and Paul E. O'Connell.
Arrangements are by the Kostanski Funeral Home, 220 Federal St., Greenfield.

E. L. MacNeill-Pfister
LAKEVILLE -- Edith L. (Paun) MacNeill-Pfister, 82, died Sunday, April 21, 1996, after a brief illness. She was the widow of Gordon E. MacNeill and widow of August Pfister and daughter of the late John G. and Louisa A. (Thomas) Paun.
She died at Thomas Hospital in Fairhope, Ala.
Born in Stoughton, she lived most of her life in Lakeville.
She was an active member of the Lakeville COA, Hannah Shaw Chapter No. 147 O.E.S., and the Rebekkahs. She was also a member of the Unitarian Universalist Church in Middleboro and enjoyed painting, traveling, and spending time with her family and her many friends.
Survivors include five children, Donald P. MacNeill of Lakeville, Elizabeth L. McManus of Seminole, Fla., Barbara J. MacNeill of Ojai, Calif., Bruce A. MacNeill of North Wales, Pa., and Linda C. Marion of Fairhope, Ala.; 19 grandchildren; 30 great-grandchildren; and a great-great-grandchild.
She was also the mother of the late Carolyn E. Lindfors.
Arrangements are by the Egger Funeral Home, 61 Pearl St., Middleboro.

E. Kenyon-Crompton, 93
NEW BEDFORD -- Edith (Watson) Kenyon-Crompton, 93, died Sunday, April 21, 1996. She was the widow of William Kenyon and Harry Crompton and daughter of the late Walter and Esther (Warwick) Watson.
She died at the Oak Hill Nursing Home in Middleboro.
A lifelong resident of New Bedford, she was a member of the South Primitive Methodist Church.
Mrs. Kenyon-Crompton was a member of the British Society.
Survivors include a son, Walter J. Kenyon of New Bedford; two daughters, Eunice Hayes of Rochester and Dorothy Garlington of New Bedford; 11 grandchildren and 21 great-grandchildren.
She was the mother of the late Edith Kelley-Barriteau.
Arrangements are by the Donaghy Funeral Home, 465 County St.

Joaquim F. Ramos
ACUSHNET -- Joaquim F. "Jackie" Ramos, 73, died at home, Monday, April 22, 1996, after a long illness. He was the husband of Lillian (Livramento) Ramos and son of the late Antone "Sunshine" and Maria (Dias) Ramos.
He was born and lived in New Bedford many years before moving to Acushnet 26 years ago. He was a communicant of Our Lady of the Assumption Church.
He formerly was employed by Perini Construction and Turner Construction as a construction foreman.
Mr. Ramos was a life member of the 9-18 Golf Club, past honorary member of the Cape Verdean-American Veterans Association, a member of the Gaylords Club and past member of the Cape Verdean Ultramarine Band Club.
Survivors include his widow; a son, Wayne D. Ramos of Acushnet; a daughter, Jacquelyn M. Ramos of Acushnet; a brother, Michael Ramos of New Bedford; a sister, Louise Pina of New Bedford; three grandchildren; a great-granddaughter; several nieces, nephews and godchildren; and his chosen brother, Joaquim "Jackie" Gonsalves of New Bedford.
He was the brother of the late Antonia "Tanya" Fortes, Antone "Mannie" Ramos, Mary "Bebia" Soares, Frank "Slappy" Ramos and Antone "Don" Ramos.
Arrangements are by the Saunders-Dwyer Home for Funerals, 495 Park St., New Bedford.

Doris Gurney
NEW BEDFORD -- Doris (Levesque) Gurney, 75, of Oriole Street, died Sunday, April 21, 1996. She was the wife of Robert S. Gurney and daughter of the late Adolor and Osithe (Richard) Levesque.
She died at the Rose Hawthorne Lathrop Home in Fall River.
She was a lifelong resident of New Bedford and a communicant of St. Anthony Church.
She was a member of the Whaling City Miniature Enthusiasts and was known for her extensive work with family genealogy.
Survivors include her widower; two sons, Robert R. Gurney of New Bedford and Charles L. Gurney of Silver Springs, Md.; a daughter, Elizabeth A. Phelan of St. Paul's, N.C.; six grandchildren; a great-grandchild; and several nieces and nephews.
Arrangements are by the Hathaway Home for Funerals, 1813 Robeson St., Fall River.

Esther Bianchi
NEWTON -- Esther (Corsi) Bianchi, 73, of Newtonville and Pinehurst Beach, Wareham, died unexpectedly, Tuesday, April 16, 1996. She was the wife of Chester Bianchi and daughter of the late Frank and Antoinette Corsi.
She died at Newton-Wellesley Hospital.
Born in Atina, Italy, she moved to Watertown when she was 14 and lived there until her marriage. She and her husband then lived in Newtonville, maintaining a summer house in Wareham for many years.
She was a communicant of Our Lady Help of Christians Church and a member of Azione Cattolica Italiana, both in Newton. She was also a member of the Pinehurst Beach Association in Wareham.
Mrs. Bianchi's carefully tended gardens were well-known to beach-goers at Pinehurst Beach near her summer home, where she regularly entertained friends and family with Italian food and music under a canopy of grape vines.
She and her husband celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary in August 1996.
Survivors include her widower; a daughter, Roseanna La Valle of Wilmington, N.C.; a sister, Yolanda Pirolli of Watertown; a brother, Armando Corsi of Watertown; two grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.
Arrangements are by the Andrew J. Magni Funeral Home, 365 Watertown St.

Alden F. Trull
FAIRHAVEN -- Alden F. Trull, 74, died Sunday, April 21, 1996. He was the widower of Rita (Everett) Trull and son of the late Carlton Cushing and Rosamond (Gifford) Trull.
He died at St. Luke's Hospital in New Bedford.
Born in Fairhaven, he was a lifelong resident of the Fairhaven area and a member of the First Congregational Church, serving as treasurer and clerk for more than 20 years.
Mr. Trull, who was a WWII Army and Coast Guard veteran, was employed by Concordia Boatyard as the assistant treasurer for more than 40 years until his retirement in 1992. He also was employed by Davis & Tripp Boatyard for a few years after serving in the war.
Mr. Trull was a member and treasurer of the Fairhaven Improvement Association, treasurer of the Fairhaven Grange for more than 40 years, treasurer for Boy Scout Troop 55 in Fairhaven, and was an active member and treasurer of the Midtown Twirlers Square Dancing Group until recently.
Survivors include two sons, David E. Trull of Fairhaven and Alden E. Trull Jr. of Appleton, Maine; two grandsons; a dear friend, Helen Silva of Fairhaven; and several nieces and nephews.
He was also the grandfather of the late Benjamin "Ben" Trull.
Arrangements are by the Fairlawn Mortuary, 180 Washington St.

Jose L. Rodrigues
NEW BEDFORD -- Jose Luis Rodrigues, 58, of Davis St., died at home unexpectedly, Saturday, April 20, 1996. He was the son of the late Jose and Emilia (de Fraga) Rodrigues.
He was born in Lages, Flores, Azores and lived in New Bedford 18 months.
He was employed for 14 months by the Sunset Restaurant-Cafe in New Bedford as a chef.
Mr. Rodrigues was a chef for eight years at various restaurants in San Jose, Calif., and for six years in the Fall River area before moving to New Bedford.
Survivors include a sister, Maria do Rosario Melo of Flores, a niece, Lucia Maria Rodrigues Melo Xavier of Strath Roy, Ontario, Canada; and several nieces and nephews in Flores.
Arrangements are by the Cabral-Baylies Square Funeral Home, 512 N. Front St.

Clara M. Crumling, 95
DARTMOUTH -- Clara M. (Woolley) Crumling, 95, of Brandon Woods, formerly of Melville Towers, died Wednesday, April 17, 1996. She was the widow of Earl Crumling and daughter of the late Burgoyne Sr. and Annie (Batty) Woolley.
Born in New Bedford, she lived in New Bedford much of her life with some prior residence in Florida. She was a member of Grace Episcopal Church and the New Bedford's Women's Club.
In her early years, she was employed as a telephone operator at New Bedford City Hall and at the U.S. Navy Hospital in Key West, Fla.
Survivors include two nieces, Clara M. LaFrance of New Bedford and Beverly A. Morgan of Titusville, Fla.; and several cousins.
She was also the sister of the late Burgoyne Woolley Jr. and Harry Woolley.
Arrangements were by the Donaghy Funeral Home, 465 County St., New Bedford.
Due to information provided by the funeral home, Mrs. Crumling's surviving cousins were omitted in Saturday's paper.


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