Miscellaneous Bristol County, Massachusetts Obituaries

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M. A. Coulombe, 90
BRANFORD, Conn. -- M. Antoinette (Masson) Coulombe, 90, died Thursday, April 4, 1996, after a long illness. She was the widow of Alfred Coulombe and Adelard Coulombe and daughter of the late Francois and Antoinette (Hamel) Masson.
She died at the Branford Hills Nursing Home.
She was born in New Bedford and moved to Hartford, Conn., 12 years ago until entering the nursing home.
While living in New Bedford she was a communicant of St. Anthony Church.
Survivors include three stepsons, Frank Coulombe of Lake Wales, Fla., Norman Coulombe of Seattle, Wash., and George Coulombe of Branford; two stepdaughters, Doris Coulombe of New Bedford and Lorraine Hennessey of Waterbury, Conn.; several step-grandchildren and step-great-grandchildren.
Arrangements are by the Rock Funeral Home, 1285 Ashley Blvd., New Bedford.

Kenneth A. Cordeiro
DARTMOUTH -- Kenneth A. Cordeiro, 56, of Village Drive, North Dartmouth, died Saturday, April 6, 1996. He was the husband of Patricia (Pimental) Cordeiro and son of the late Antone and Hilda (Rose) Cordeiro.
Born in New Bedford, he lived in North Dartmouth for the past 26 years and was a communicant of St. Julie's Church.
He was employed by Barletta Engineering in Rosindale as a construction foreman and supervisor for more than 30 years until his retirement due to illness last year.
Mr. Cordeiro attended New Bedford High School, Southeastern Massachusetts University and Bristol Community College.
He was a Marine Corps veteran and a member of the Carpenters Union in Fall River.
Survivors include his widow; two sons, Kevin M. Cordeiro of West Warwick, R.I., and Mark S. Cordeiro of Springfield; a sister, Elaine Petitas of New Bedford; three grandchildren; and several nieces and nephews.
Arrangements are by the Dartmouth Funeral Home, 230 Russells Mills Road, South Dartmouth.

James D. Brightman
FREETOWN -- James D. Brightman, 80, died Tuesday, March 26, 1996. He was the husband of Margaret (Irvin) Brightman and the son of the late James D. and Lillian (Davoll) Brightman.
He died at St. Luke's Hospital in New Bedford.
He was born in New Bedford and lived in Freetown for the last 49 years.
He was a sergeant with the Freetown Police Department until his retirement, and he previously was employed by Railway Express Agency as a truck driver for 30 years until the firm ceased to operate.
During his retirement he became involved in and taught wood carving.
Mr. Brightman was a World War II Army veteran, serving in Europe as a tank commander. He was a member of the Armored Division, 87th Cavalry 'Recon' Squadron, Mechanized.
He was a member of the Bristol-Plymouth Woodcarvers and was the present treasurer. He was a member of the New England Woodcarvers and was a director at large. He was a member of the Cape Cod Woodcarvers and the Acushnet Gun Club.
He also belonged to the 7th Armored Division Association and the Veterans of the Battle of the Bulge, the American Legion Post 1 and the Veterans of Foreign Wars.
Survivors include his widow; a daughter, Jane M. Brightman of New York, N.Y.; three sisters, Eunice Peterson and Lillian Entwistle, both of New Bedford and Ruth Rebello of Fairhaven; and several nieces and nephews.
He was also the brother of the late Helen Key.
Arrangements were by the Donaghy Funeral Home, 465 County St., New Bedford.

Telesphore Remy, 95
SWANSEA -- Telesphore Remy, 95, of 51 Oakland Ave., died Saturday, April 6, 1996. He was the widower of Irene (Courchaine) Remy and Irene (Carpenter) Gariepy Remy and son of the late Francois and Delina (Boudrie) Remy.
He died at Charlton Memorial Hospital in Fall River.
Born in Fall River, he lived in Swansea most of his life.
He was employed by the Town of Swansea Highway Department for many years and for Montaup Electric in Somerset for 25 years.
Survivors include five sons, Albert Remy and Leon Remy, both of Fall River, Rene Remy and Andrew Remy, both of Swansea and Edward Remy of Pawtucket, R.I.; three daughters, Anita Francoeur Marshall and Lorraine Remy, both of Swansea, and Bernadette Adam of Fall River; several grandchildren, great-grandchildren, great-great-grandchildren and nieces and nephews.
He was also the father of the late Bertha Boyer and the brother of the late Adela Levesque, Sister Marie Remy, SSJ, Noe Remy, Francois Remy and Remy Remy.
Arrangements are by the Auclair Funeral Home, 690 S. Main St., Fall River.

Stephen R. Olivier
ACUSHNET -- Stephen R. Olivier, 47, died Saturday, April 6, 1996, after a long illness. He was the husband of Claudette J. (Charest) Olivier and son of Leo and Florence (Hotte) Olivier of Plymouth and Jensen Beach, Fla.
He died at St. Luke's Hospital in New Bedford.
Born in New Bedford, he lived in Acushnet most of his life and was a communicant of St. Francis Xavier Church.
Mr. Olivier was an artist and a member of the Bierstadt Art Society and Acushnet Cultural Council.
Survivors include his parents; a son, Stephen R. Olivier II of Somerville; a daughter, Jolene M. Olivier of Acushnet; two brothers, Daniel Olivier of Acushnet and James Olivier of Cranston, R.I.; two sisters, Elizabeth McKnight of Acushnet and Louise Olivier of Florida; and several nieces and nephews.
Arrangements are by the Rock Funeral Home, 1285 Ashley Blvd., New Bedford.

Lodia F. Langlois
NEW BEDFORD -- Lodia F. (L'Heureux) Langlois, 88, died at home Wednesday, April 3, 1996. She was the widow of Edouard H. Langlois and the daughter of the late Joseph L. and Marie (Levesque) L'Heureux.
She was a lifelong resident of New Bedford and a communicant of St. Anthony of Padua Church.
She was employed by the former New Bedford Rayon Company until her retirement.
Survivors include a brother, Ernest L. L'Heureux of Willimantic, Conn.; and nieces and nephews.
Arrangements were by the Donaghy Funeral Home, 465 County St.

John Gayoski, 93
ROCHESTER -- John Gayoski, 93, died at home Saturday, April 6, 1996, the day after his 93rd birthday. He was the widower of Adeline (Hall) Gayoski and the son of the late Valentine and Mary (Zagol) Gayoski.
He was a lifelong resident of the Rochester area.
He was a self-employed chicken and produce farmer all of his life and semi-retired in 1968.
He was a former member of the Rochester Grange and enjoyed playing the harmonica.
He and his wife enjoyed participating in many minstrel shows in the Wareham and Cape Cod areas.
Survivors include three sisters, Elizabeth Corey of Rochester, Florence MacMinn of Wareham and Jenny Stinson of Marion; two granddaughters; three great-granddaughters; a great-grandson and several nieces and nephews.
He was also the father of the late Paul G. Gayoski and brother of the late Thomas Gayoski Sr. and the late Alice Robbins.
Arrangements are by the Fairlawn Mortuary, 180 Washington St., Fairhaven.

Sterling McMurrin
ST. GEORGE, Utah -- Sterling McMurrin, former U.S. education commissioner, longtime University of Utah philosophy professor and influential Mormon intellectual, has died at age 82.
Mr. McMurrin died Saturday at Dixie Regional Medical Center, where he had been treated for lung and heart ailments.
He was commissioner of education during the Kennedy administration, and was known for championing school desegregation and national initiatives for hiring women and minorities in education.
He became a professor of philosophy at the University of Utah in 1948, and retired as dean of its graduate school in 1978.
He was sometimes controversial in his influence on Mormon intellectuals, and in the 1950s was known as an "articulate and loyal heretic," said Jack Newell, a colleague at the university.
"He was an inspiration of thousand of other people to be honest about their beliefs, to say what they think," Mr. Newell said.
For example, Mr. McMurrin was a critic of the church's exclusion of blacks from the priesthood before the practice was changed in 1978.
He is survived by his wife, Natalie, two sons, three daughters and five grandchildren.
A memorial service was scheduled for Thursday at the Mormon Church's Monument Park 15th Ward in Salt Lake City.

Leticia Morgado, 92
NEW BEDFORD -- Leticia (Pereira) Morgado, 92, died Monday, April 8, 1996. She was the widow of Manuel Morgado and the daughter of the late Raul and Maria (Martins) Pereira.
She died at Brandon Woods of Dartmouth.
She was born in New Bedford and lived in Mattapoisett from 1946 to 1990 when she returned to New Bedford. She was a communicant of Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church.
She was employed by the former Pairpoint Glass Co. until it closed and then by the former Gosnold Mills in the cloth room and worked for a short time at the former Browne Drugstore in downtown, New Bedford.
Survivors include a stepdaughter, Irene Harrop of Mattapoisett; two brothers, Raul M. Pereira of New Bedford and Armand M. Pereira of Fairhaven and nieces and nephews.
Arrangements are by the Donaghy Funeral Home, 465 County St.

Lucille A. C. Fuller
FAIRHAVEN -- Lucille "Lucy" A. (Adriano) Carreiro Fuller, 52, died Sunday, April 7, 1996, after a long illness. She was the wife of William H. Fuller Jr. and daughter of John and Emily (Viera) Adriano, both of Fairhaven.
She died at the Deaconess Hospital in Boston.
Born in Sao Miguel, Azores, Portugal, she lived in Fairhaven for most of her life.
She was employed by Eastern Sportswear as a stitcher for more than 15 years and was a member of the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Witness in New Bedford.
Survivors include her widower and parents; a son, Christopher A. Gifford of New Bedford; four brothers, John Adriano of N. Dartmouth, Charles M. Adriano of Phoenix, Anthony M. Adriano of Los Angeles and Robert Adriano of Fairhaven; three sisters, Dorothy Olsen and Marilyn Bizarro, both of Fairhaven and Nancy Silva of New Bedford; three stepsons, William H. "Buddy" Fuller III of Hyannis and Christopher Fuller and Alexander Fuller, both of Centerville; three stepdaughters, Kate Fuller of Centerville, Susan Fuller of Florida and Lynn Fuller of California, four grandchildren, two step-grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.
Arrangements are by the Fairlawn Mortuary, 180 Washington St.

Arlene J. Fernandes
NEW BEDFORD -- Arlene J. (Mendes) Fernandes, 57, died at her daughter's home Sunday, April 7, 1996, after a long illness. She was the daughter of the late James and Dorothy R. (Correia) Mendes.
She was born and lived in New Bedford most of her life.
She was formerly employed by McDonald's in downtown New Bedford for many years until her retirement.
Survivors include a daughter, Cheryl A. Primus of Fairhaven; a brother, Kenneth Mendes of Oakland, Calif., several nieces and nephews and great-nieces and great-nephews.
Arrangements are by the Saunders-Dwyer Home for Funerals, 495 Park St.

Maryann E. Soucy
NEW BEDFORD -- Maryann Eva Soucy, 84, died Saturday, April 6, 1996. She was the daughter of the late Wilfred and Annie (Lawrence) Soucy.
She died at Hallmark Nursing Home.
Born in New Bedford she lived in the New Bedford area all of her life, was a communicant of St. Anthony of Padua Church and was employed by area restaurants as a waitress for forty years until her retirement.
Survivors include a sister, Marion Soucy of Scituate; two brothers, Leopold Soucy Sr. of New Bedford and Wilfred A. Soucy of Oldsmar, Fla., and nieces and nephews.
She was the sister of the late Loretta Soucy.
Arrangements are by the Wilson Chapel, 479 County St.

Margaret Reynolds, 90
FAIRHAVEN -- Margaret Reynolds, 90, of Alden Road, formerly of New Bedford, died Sunday, April 7, 1996. She was the widow of Edward Reynolds Sr. and daughter of the late Michael and Elizabeth (Lardner) Weir.
She died at the Alden Court Nursing Care and Rehabilitation Center.
Born in New Bedford, she lived in New Bedford until moving to Fairhaven five years ago where she was a communicant of St. Mary's Church.
Mrs. Reynolds was employed by the former Acushnet Hospital as a housekeeper for more than 25 years.
Survivors include a son, Donald Reynolds of Acushnet; three daughters, Patricia Bordwick and Margaret Hinckley, both of Fairhaven and Alice Wroblinski of Ko Ko, Fla., 18 grandchildren, 36 great-grandchildren, five great-great-grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.
She was also the mother of the late Edward Reynolds Jr.
Arrangements are by the Fairlawn Mortuary, 180 Washington St.

Benjamin L. Pierce Jr.
WAREHAM -- Benjamin L. Pierce Jr., 64, of 18 Nelson St., West Wareham, died Sunday, April 7, 1996.
He died at the VA Hospital in West Roxbury.
He was born in Brockton and served in the U.S. Army from Jan. of 1949 to March of 1952. He received a Purple Heart for wounds received in Ching-ni, South Korea on April 3, 1951 and was discharged as a private 2nd class.
Mr. Pierce was employed by the Army Corps of Engineers of Bourne as a maintenance man for several years until his retirement in 1994. He was an active member of VFW Post 2188 in Middleboro since 1984 and served as the post commander in 1991-92 and enjoyed fishing as a hobby.
Survivors include a son, Benjamin L. Pierce III of Weaver, Alabama; a daughter, Suzanne E. Tisdale of Bryantville and two grandchildren.
Arrangements are by the Nickerson-Bourne Funeral Home, 59 Peirce St., Middleboro.

Stephen P. Botelho
NEW BEDFORD -- Stephen P. Botelho, 44, died Monday, April 8, 1996. He was the son of the late Antone J. and Gilda (Alexander) Botelho.
He died at St. Luke's Hospital.
He was a lifelong resident of the area and a graduate of New Bedford Vocational High School.
He was employed by the Acushnet Company as a press operator and previously worked at the J.C. Rhodes Company as a machinist for 19 years.
Survivors include a daughter, Stephanie Davignon of New Bedford; two sons, Sampson Little and Christopher Little, both of New Bedford; two sisters, Sandra LaFrance and Kimberly McDuffie, both of New Bedford; his maternal grandmother, Mary S. Medeiros; his loving friend, Lola Tracz; two grandchildren and several cousins, nieces and nephews.
Arrangements are by the Donaghy Funeral Home, 465 County St.

Ernest Medeiros
NEW BEDFORD -- Ernest Medeiros, 86, of Thompson Street died Sunday, April 7, 1996. He was the widower of Lydia Medeiros.
He died at Charlton Memorial Hospital in Fall River.
He was a lifelong resident of New Bedford and a communicant of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church.
He was employed by the former Goodyear Tire and Rubber Plant for many years.
Survivors include nieces and nephews.
Arrangements are by the Donaghy Funeral Home, 465 County St.

Peter Paolella
JOHNSTON, R.I. -- Peter Paolella, 58, of Stromberg Court, died Saturday, April 6, 1996, after a brief illness. He was the husband of Cecile D. (Hebert) Paolella, formerly of New Bedford and son of the late Antonio and Andreana (Martellini) Paolella.
He died at the Philip Hulitar Hospice Care Inpatient Center in Providence.
He was born in Providence and moved to Johnston 23 years ago. He was a graduate of Mount Pleasant High School and received his bachelor's, master's and doctorate degrees from the University of Rhode Island.
Mr. Paolella was an associate professor of biology at Stonehill College, North Easton for 24 years until his illness.
He was a communicant of St. Rocco Church where he served as an usher for the 10:30 Mass on Sunday mornings and was past president of the St. Rocco School Board. He was also a volunteer for the American Cancer Society and was a committee person for Boy Scout Troop 6 in Cranston.
Survivors include his widow; a son, Christopher Paolella of Johnston; two daughters, Andreana G. and Eileen M. Paolella, both of Johnston; a brother, Edward Paolella, and a sister, Anna Rossi, both of Cranston.
Arrangements are by the Woodlawn Funeral Home, 600 Pontiac Ave., Cranston.

John Bulkeley, decorated Navy officer
WASHINGTON -- Retired Navy Vice Adm. John Bulkeley, one of the most highly decorated combat veterans of World War II and commander of the U.S. Navy base at Guantanamo, Cuba, during a tense period in the 1960s, is dead at 84.
He died Saturday at his home in nearby Silver Spring, Md.
Adm. Bulkeley gained fame as a PT boat commander early in the war after commanding the boat that rescued Army Gen. Douglas MacArthur from the Philippines in 1942.
For that and other actions in the early days of the Pacific war, Adm. Bulkeley won the Medal of Honor, the nation's highest award for valor.
The award citation credited him with "remarkable achievement in damaging or destroying a notable number of Japanese planes, surface combatant and merchant ships, and in dispersing landing parties and land-based enemy forces during four months and eight days without benefit of repairs, overhauls or maintenance facilities for his squadron."
Among the young officers he subsequently required for PT duty was John F. Kennedy, who also gained fame as a PT boat commander before becoming president.
Later in the war, Adm. Bulkeley commanded groups of PT boats and minesweepers that cleared the way for the D-Day amphibious invasion at Utah Beach in Normandy and went on to command a destroyer credited with sinking two German ships.
Mr. Kennedy appointed Adm. Bulkeley as commanding officer at Guantanamo after he became president in 1961 -- at a time Cuban leader Fidel Castro was trying to get the United States to abandon the base by, among other things, building machine gun nests outside the U.S. base and shutting off the base's fresh water supply.
Adm. Bulkeley told reporters the machine gun emplacements were useless and referred to them as "Cuban landscaping." And when Mr. Castro offered to turn the water back on for an hour a day, the admiral told him not to bother; he had already made other arrangements.

Ben Johnson, actor, rodeo star
MESA, Ariz. -- Ben Johnson, a champion rodeo performer who appeared in numerous Westerns and won an Oscar for "The Last Picture Show" in 1971, died yesterday of an apparent heart attack.
Mr. Johnson, 77, collapsed while visiting his mother at Leisure World, a suburban Phoenix retirement community where they both lived.
"He asked a lady to fix him some breakfast and he went into the bathroom and that's where he collapsed," said Buster Brown, an assistant to Mr. Johnson.
Mr. Johnson arrived in Hollywood in the early 1940s as a horse wrangler for Howard Hughes' "The Outlaw."
He was working as a double and stuntman in Westerns when he was discovered by director John Ford, who cast him as a cavalry sergeant in two of his films and gave him the starring role in "The Wagon Master."
Mr. Johnson received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in June 1994, more than 50 years after he arrived in town.
"I don't know why in the hell you all waited so long to give me the star," he said at the time. "You waited till I got so old I couldn't hardly enjoy it."

Mildred Holmes, 91
NEWTON -- Mildred Holmes, 91, of 160 Stanton Ave., died Tuesday, April 9, 1996. She was the widow of Dr. Sidney G. Holmes and daughter of the late Felix and Johanna (Heyeneman) Fleischhacker.
She died at the Newton-Wellesley Hospital.
Born in New York City, she lived in Newton and Brookline for 17 years and was the president of the Golda Meir House in Newton for 10 years.
Survivors include a son, Michael Holmes of New Bedford and two grandchildren.
Arrangements were by Max Sugarman Memorial Chapel, 458 Hope St., Providence.
Richard Condon, 81, 'Prizzi's Honor' writer
By Terry Wallace, Associated Press writer
DALLAS -- Best-selling author Richard Condon, whose novel of brainwashing and murder, "The Manchurian Candidate," had eerie similarities to the assassination of President Kennedy, died yesterday. He was 81.
Mr. Condon died at Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, where he had been since last week, his daughter said. He had suffered from heart and kidney failure and had been receiving dialysis treatments since last year, daughter Deborah Condon said.
Mr. Condon, a onetime film publicist who didn't take up novel writing until he was in his 40s, saw "Candidate" and another of his novels, "Prizzi's Honor," made into acclaimed movies.
Among his other novels, many with a strong satirical, anti-establishment bent: "The Oldest Confession," "Some Angry Angel," "Emperor of America," "A Talent for Loving," "Winter Kills" and "An Infinity of Mirrors."
"Prizzi's Honor," 1982, was the first of a series on Mafia life that included "Prizzi's Family," 1986, "Prizzi's Glory," 1988, and "Prizzi's Money," 1993 about the outlaw family's efforts to gain the summit of political respectability.
"Best of all is his ability to tell a story so skillfully that you find yourself almost hoping that the Prizzis will make it to the White House after all," a Washington Post critic wrote.
Mr. Condon also co-wrote the screenplay for the film version of "Prizzi's Honor," directed by John Huston. The 1985 film -- in which a Mafia hit man marries a hit woman and they end up with contracts on each other -- netted a best supporting actress Oscar for Mr. Huston's daughter, Anjelica, and an Oscar nomination for the screenwriters.
"The Manchurian Candidate" tells the story of an American prisoner of war in Korea who, brainwashed and programmed to kill, returns to the United States and assassinates a powerful politician.
The book came out in 1959 and the film version, starring Laurence Harvey as the brainwashed man and Frank Sinatra as a fellow soldier who tries to thwart the plot, came out in 1962.
The John Frankenheimer-directed movie was seen at the time of its release as a comic sendup of political paranoia. But events during the 1960s changed the perception. After JFK was killed by a former Marine who spent time in the Soviet Union, the film was withdrawn for many years. It was later reissued to new acclaim.
Mr. Condon recalled later that only after the film version came out did the book become a big seller.
"Every book I've ever written has been about abuse of power," he once said. "I feel very strongly about that. I'd like people to know how deeply their politicians are wronging them."
Before writing books, the New York City native pitched films. Hired as a press agent for Walt Disney Productions in 1937, Mr. Condon worked in the movie business for more than 20 years, putting in time at nearly all the major studios.
He liked to tell the story of how, as a novice publicist, he horrified Disney by suggesting a pork producers group be enlisted to get publicity about a cartoon sequel to "The Three Little Pigs." Disney didn't want fans to get a mental picture of cute cartoon characters sent to a slaughterhouse.
Mr. Condon's friends and acquaintances included Mr. Sinatra and Cary Grant, studio heads Harry Cohn and Adolph Zukor and directors John Huston and Stanley Kramer.
He said he took up writing -- "all I could do was spell" -- after the movie business gave him an ulcer.
Seeing thousands of films over the years helped, he said. "I learned beginning, middle and ending for scenes, and, come to think of it, beginning, middle and ending for sentences, and characters and exists and entrances. That was unconsciously washing over me for 22 years."
Mr. Condon had lived in Dallas for 16 years.
Besides daughter Deborah, survivors include his wife of more than 55 years, Evelyn; and another daughter, Wendy Jackson, with whom Mr. Condon wrote a cookbook.

M. Patricia Becker
NEW BEDFORD -- Private funeral services were held Tuesday for M. Patricia (McCann) Becker, 70, who died Sunday April 7, 1996, after a brief illness. She was the wife of Peter O. Becker, III and daughter of the late Thomas J. and Agnes (Barry) McCann.
She died at St. Luke's Hospital.
A lifelong resident of New Bedford and a communicant of St. Mary's Church, she was employed by NYNEX as a group chief operator for 44 years until her retirement in 1987.
Mrs. Becker was a member of the Telephone Company Pioneers and the former secretary of the Telephone Workers Credit Union.
Survivors include her widower; a brother, Stephen F. McCann of South Dartmouth; a sister, Agnes Connolly of North Kingston, R.I., and several nieces and nephews.
Arrangements were by the Saunders-Dwyer Home for Funerals, 495 Park St.

Annie Sylvan
DARTMOUTH -- Annie (Cocker) Sylvan, 85, died at home Monday, April 8, 1996. She was the wife of "Bill" Gordon Sylvan and daughter of the late John and Rachel (Johnson) Cocker.
Born in Oldham, Lancashire, England, she came to New Bedford in 1924 and lived in Schenectady, N.Y., for a year before returning to the New Bedford-Dartmouth area, where she had lived for the past 72 years.
A graduate of the Evangeline Booth Hospital in Boston, she worked at the former Acushnet Hospital and the former Kirby Nursing Home as a licensed practical nurse. She then worked at the former Brockton Public Market on Purchase Street, New Bedford, until 1951. Since the birth of her children, she has been a homemaker.
A member and very active with the Salvation Army, Mrs. Sylvan served in many capacities: as a band member, songster, the Home League, junior soldier sergeant, Sunday school teacher, and the League of Mercy. She was also a member of the American Association of Retired Persons.
Survivors include her widower; a daughter, Sharon Linda Camacho of Dartmouth, a grandson, nieces and nephews.
She was the mother of the late Rachel May Sylvan and sister of the late Granville Cocker.
Arrangements are by Donaghy Funeral Home, 465 County St., New Bedford.

George R. Surprenant
FAIRHAVEN -- George R. Surprenant, 81, died Tuesday, April 9, 1996, after a long illness. He was the husband of Noella E. (Benoit) Alferes-Surprenant, widower of Antoinette (Richard) Surprenant and son of the late Amedee and Olivine (Ouimette) Surprenant.
He died at Our Lady's Haven.
Born in New Bedford, he lived in New Bedford before moving to Fairhaven in 1947. He was a parishioner of St. Joseph Church and employed by Fibre Leather as a machine operator for 25 years until his retirement.
Mr. Surprenant was a member of the Knights of Columbus Damien Council 4190, Mattapoisett, the Holy Name Society and Couples Club, both of St. Joseph Church, and an original member of the former Sconticut Neck Improvement Association.
He was a foster parent for many years and enjoyed traveling and cruises.
Survivors include his widow; three sons, Gerard Surprenant of New Bedford, Roger Surprenant of Fairhaven and Leo Surprenant of California; a daughter, Jeanne Fifield of Middleton; five stepchildren, Audrey Horetzke of Billerica, Marguerite Canastra, Gerald Alferes, Thomas Alferes and James Alferes, all of Fairhaven; three sisters, Rolande Munroe of New Bedford, Claire Hutte of North Carolina and Florence Jacobeson of Pennsylvania, 11 grandchildren, 17 stepgrandchildren, two great-grandchildren, several step great-grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.
He was the brother of the late Paul Surprenant, Antoinette Gingras and Juliette Thomas.
Arrangements are by the Fairhaven Funeral Home, 117 Main St.

Maria C. Salgado
NEW BEDFORD -- Maria C. (Lopes) Salgado, 67, died at home Monday, April 8, 1996, after a brief illness. She was the wife of Horacio S. Salgado and daughter of the late Francisco and Maria Lopes.
Born in Terceira, Azores, she lived in New Bedford for more than 28 years and was formerly employed by Madeline Clothing as a clothes cleaner.
Survivors include her widower; a sister, Ida Machado Lopes of Terceira, a niece and three nephews.
Arrangements are by Perry Funeral Home, 111 Dartmouth St.

Armand A. Rock
NEW BEDFORD -- Armand "Rocky" A. Rock, 60, died Monday, April 8, 1996, after a long illness. He was the widower of Helen (Stavropolus) Rock and son of the late Louis T. and Antoinette (Duteau) Rock.
He died at St. Luke's Hospital.
A lifelong resident of New Bedford, he was a communicant of Holy Name Church and employed by J.C. Rhodes of New Bedford for more than 25 years until his retirement in 1986 due to illness.
Mr. Rock was a Navy veteran, serving during the Korean War and seeing action aboard the USS Bigelow and the USS Wisconsin.
Mr. Rock was past president of the Fraternal Order of Eagles Aerie 647 of New Bedford and member of the Fairhaven American Legion Post 166.
Survivors include a stepdaughter, Helen McNutt of Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.; a sister, Adeline Demsey of Reading; a brother, Louis Rock of Palmer and several nieces and nephews.
He was the brother of the late Janet Felone and Edmond Rock.
Arrangements are by Brooklawn Funeral Home, 15 Irvington Court.

Rush Limbaugh Sr., oldest practicing lawyer in the U.S.
CAPE GIRARDEAU, Mo. -- Rush H. Limbaugh Sr., grandfather of talk show host Rush Limbaugh and the nation's oldest practicing lawyer, died Monday at his home at age 104. He had been ill for a couple of months.
"It's a resource lost but a treasure trove of memories," his grandson told his national radio audience yesterday.
Mr. Limbaugh was born in 1892 on a farm in Bollinger County in southeast Missouri. He became interested in law at age 10, after receiving a book of orations from his sister, who was a teacher.
In recent months, he headed into work at least twice a week at the Limbaugh, Russell, Payne and Howard law firm, which he founded in 1916.
Two sons and four grandsons followed him into law.
His son, Rush H. Limbaugh Jr., who died in 1990, practiced law with him. Another son, Stephen Limbaugh, is a federal judge in St. Louis. Stephen Limbaugh Jr. is a Missouri Supreme Court judge. Three other grandsons are lawyers.
"I take great pride in the lawyers in the family," the elder Limbaugh said during a lecture in January at Southeast Missouri State University. "They have done so much to help in the field of education and the law."
One of the highlights of his career came in 1958, when the U.S. State Department invited Mr. Limbaugh to lecture in a newly liberated India before lawyers, judges and university students on the subject of constitutional government and the American judicial system.
He argued more than 60 cases before the state Supreme Court. He specialized in probate law and helped draft the 1955 Probate Code of Missouri.
Others remembered Mr. Limbaugh for his oratorical skills. One caller yesterday morning to Rush Limbaugh's radio program spoke of a chance meeting with the elder Limbaugh. "I've got to tell you I've never, ever met any man, young or old, who was more eloquent," the caller said. "I was just enamored with his ability to communicate so precisely."
Mr. Limbaugh was active in a number of professional organizations. He was a former president of the Missouri Bar, a charter member of the Missouri Bar Foundation and a member of the American Bar Foundation.
He also served on the Cape Girardeau Board of Education and was chairman of the Cape Girardeau County Republican Committee.
In 1985, then-Gov. John Ashcroft declared May 17 "Rush H. Limbaugh Day" in Missouri.


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