Ness County, Kansas

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The following obituaries are of the deceased buried in Ransom Cemetery, St. Aloysius Catholic Cemetery, and Cyrus Cemetery, Ransom, Ness County, Kansas. These obituaries and news articles were collected and contributed by Mark Horchem.

ANNA GARRELTS

 

      Mrs. Anna Garrelts, 85, for 60 years a resident of the Brownell community, passed away at the Grisell Memorial Nursing home of a heart attack on Friday, January 17.  She had been a resident there for about six weeks.

      She was born at Stormlake, Iowa, on April 27, 1883, and married John Garrelts on December 23, 1907, at Dubuque, Kansas.  He passed away March 10, 1947.

      She was preceded in death by an infant daughter, Sarah Christine.

      Survivors include two sons, Johnnie M. Garrelts of Ransom, and Kenneth A. Garrelts of Tacoma, Wash.; a sister, Mrs. Jennie Hendrix of Denver, Colo.; three grandsons, five great-grandchildren, other relatives and friends.

      Funeral services were held from the Brownell United Methodist Church on Monday afternoon, January 20, conducted by the pastor, Rev. William McFall of Ransom.  Interment was in the Ransom Cemetery with Fitzgeralds in charge.

 

Ness Co. News, Jan. 23, 1969

 

      Anna I. Garrelts, a resident of the Brownell community for 50 years, passed away of a heart attack at the Ransom Nursing Home on Friday, January 17, 1969.  She had been a resident of the nursing home six weeks.

      She was born on April 27, 1883, at Storm Lake, Iowa, to George and Sarah Milton.  The family moved to eastern Kansas in 1895, and on to Barton County in 1905.

      She was united in marriage to John Garrelts on December 23, 1907, at Dubuque, Kansas; they moved to Ness County in 1918.

      She was a member of the Assembly of God Church of McCracken,

      Annie’s favorite pastimes were gardening, sewing and corresponding with her many friends.  Those who knew Annie cherished her for her wit and sense of humor.  She clung so steadfastly to the old fashioned ways, and in so doing, enjoyed life so much.

      She was preceded in death by a daughter, Sarah Christina, who died in infancy February 20, 1909; and her husband, John, who passed away March 10, 1947.

      She leaves to mourn her passing:  Two sons, Johnnie of Ransom, and Kenneth of Tacoma, Wash.; one sister, Jennie Hendrix of Denver, Colo.; three grandsons, David of Independence, Mo., Gayle of Topeka, and Chester of Tacoma, Wash.; five great grandchildren.

      Now she belongs to the ages, but she’ll live on in our hearts forever.

 

Ness Co. News, January 30, 1969

 

 


CLEO GARRELTS

 

OBITUARY

 

      Cleo Pauline, daughter of Mae and Delevan Tillitson, was born December 23, 1913, near Arnold, Kans., where she has made her home her entire life.

      She was united in marriage to Glenn Ernest Garrelts on July 19, 1934.

      After a lingering illness of several months and in spite of all that medical skill and loving hands could do she passed to her heavenly reward May 2, 1937, at the age of 23 years, four months and eight days.

      In early girlhood she accepted Christ as her savior and joined the Methodist Church at Arnold, where she was a member at the time of her death.

      Cleo was a loving wife and daughter and her cheerful disposition spread happiness and joy to her family and all who knew and loved her.

      She leaves to mourn her passing her husband, Glenn Garrelts, of Arnold; her mother and father, one sister, Letha, two brothers, Oliver and Leslie, and a great uncle, Lum Larkins, all of Arnold; one aunt, Edna Tyson, of Larned, Kans.; two uncles, Eddie Taylor of Ness City, and A.E. Tillitson, of Belton, Mont., and many other relatives and a host of friends.

      Funeral services were held from the Methodist Church at Ransom last Wednesday afternoon, conducted by Rev. Nutter, pastor of the Arnold Church and assisted by Rev. Rothweiler of the Ransom church.  Miss Lila McNinch, pianist, played softly as the casket was borne into the church and placed near the altar amid a bower of flowers.  A double mixed quartet composed of Mrs. Ira Stutzman, Mrs. F.T. McNinch, Mrs. Nutter, Mr. and Mrs. L.B. Dubbs, Theron LaPlante, Geo. Shellenberger and Elmer Clyne sang “In the Sweet By and By”, “Does Jesus Care?”, and “Sometime We’ll Understand”.

      Pallbearers were Cleo’s classmates assisted by two from Glenn’s class.  They were Ray Sonnenberg, Charles Smith, Orville Conkright, Victor Breit, Charles Yost and Joe Lyon.  Funeral Director John Aeby had charge of the body which was tenderly laid to rest in the Ransom Cemetery.

 

Ransom Record, May 13, 1937

 

 

 


JOHN GARRELTS

 

     Funeral services for John Garrelts, 68, of Brownell will be held on Friday, March 14, from the Brownell High School at 2 p.m.  The deceased passed away on Monday, March 10, following an extended illness.

 

Ness Co. News, March 13, 1947

 

 

OBITUARY

 

        John Marion Garrelts, oldest son of John and Christine Garrelts, was born at Harrisburg, Ill. July 9, 1878 and passed away at the Grisell Memorial Hospital in Ransom, March 10, 1947, at the age of 68 years, 8 months and 1 day, after an illness of more than 15 years.  He spent many weeks in different hospitals where all that medical skill and loving hands could do for him were of no avail and he gradually grew weaker until the end.

      He came to Barton County with his parents and sisters when only a few months old, where he grew to manhood. 

      He was united in marriage to Miss Anna I. Milton December 23, 1907.  To this union three children were born:  Sarah Christine, who passed away at the age of six weeks; John Milton of Ransom; and Kenneth Alexander of Boise, Idaho.  The family moved from Barton County in August, 1918, and located on a farm west of Brownell where they lived for several years.

      John was one of a family of 10 children, all of whom preceded him in death except two sisters:  Mrs. Anna Lubbers of Ensign, and Mrs. Effie Hammerstead of Redlands, Calif.  He is also survived by his wife, Anna, who was constantly by his side during his illness; their two sons, two daughters-in-law, three grandsons, and a host of other relatives and friends.

      One of his greatest pleasures was to spend an afternoon up town visiting his many friends.  His family was always first in his thoughts and until poor health overtook him, he was never too busy to lend a helping hand wherever needed.

      Garrelts was baptized into the Presbyterian Church when a baby, and when a young man he attended church regularly.  A short time before his passing he told members of his family that he was ready to go Home, and was going soon.

  Funeral services were conducted Friday afternoon, March 14, at 2 o’clock at the Brownell Methodist Church by Rev. Eugene Woolverton of Hays.  A quartet composed of Orville Hair, Donald Weeks, Woodrow Stull and Francis Zeller, sang “The Old Rugged Cross”, “Sweet Bye and Bye” and “Abide with Me.”  Pall bearers were:  Ben and Roy Skaggs, Virgil Snodgrass, Carl Richolson, Chet Ricks, all of Brownell, and Frank Ramsey of Salina.  The remains were tenderly laid to rest in the Ransom Cemetery with Mortician Fitzgerald in charge.

      Out-of-town guests who attended the funeral were:  David Garrelts, Mrs. Betty Grimes and Frank Ramsey of Salina; Mrs. Emma Thorne and Henry of Hoisington; Mr. and Mrs. E.R. Lubbers of Ensign; Mr. and Mrs. John Lubbers of Dodge City; and Mrs. Mary Hendrix and Wayne of Modoc.

Ness Co. News, March 20, 1947


JOHNNIE GARRELTS

 

      Johnnie Milton Garrelts, 81, died May 27, 1992, at St. Anthony’s Hospital, Hays.

      He was born June 9, 1910, in Barton County near Redwing, the son of John M. and Anna Milton Garrelts.  He was a near lifelong resident of Ransom and a trucker and farmer.

      On June 18, 1937, he married Jackie Ramsey at Dodge City.  She survives.

      Other survivors include:  a son, Gayle, Meriden; a grandson.

      Funeral will be at 2 p.m. Friday at the Fitzgerald Funeral Home, Ness City.  Friends may call from 1 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday and until service time Friday at the funeral home.  Burial will be in the Ransom Cemetery.

      Memorial may be sent to the donor’s choice.

 

Unknown newspaper source

 

      Johnnie Milton Garrelts, 81, a longtime resident of Ness County, died Tuesday, May 27, 1992, at St. Anthony’s Hospital in Hays.  He was a retired trucker and farmer.

      Born June 9, 1910, in Barton County, he married Jackie Ramsey June 18, 1937, at Dodge City.

      He is survived by his wife, of the home; a son, Gayle of Meriden; and one grandson.

      The funeral was Friday afternoon at the Fitzgerald Funeral Home in Ness City with the Rev. Charles Cryderman, pastor of the Ransom United Methodist Church, presiding.  Burial was in the Ransom Cemetery.  The family suggests memorials to the donor’s choice.

 

Ness Co. News, June 4, 1992

 


MARY GARRELTS

 

      Mary Barbara Milton was born at Storm Lake, Iowa, February 13, 1891, and died at her home at Crowley, Colo., October 2, 1924.  She came to Prescott, Kansas with her parents, brothers and sisters in 1895 and lived near Pleasanton, Linn Co., for several years, later moving to Barton County, near Hoisington, where she was married to Tony J. Garrelts, May 26, 1908.

      To this union 5 children were born, Herbert, Glenn, Gladys, Wayne and Geneva, all of whom survive her.  They moved to Crowley, Colo., in April 1917, where they have lived ever since.

      She was converted and joined the Presbyterian Church about 3 years ago and has lived a devoted Christian life ever since, taking an active part in church work.  She was a faithful and loving wife and mother, a dutiful daughter, and sister, and a friend and neighbor always ready to help where needed.  She is survived by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Milton, her brother, Will, her sisters, Mrs. Helen Trott and Mrs. Anna Garrelts, all of Brownell, and Mrs. Jennie Hendrix of Modoc, Kansas.  One brother, Alex preceded her ten years ago.

      At the time of her death, she was 33 years, 8 months and 2 weeks and 4 days old.  Funeral services were held at Crowley, Colo., Friday morning, conducted by her pastor, Rev. Hughes, and the remains, accompanied by her husband and children and her mother, were brought to Brownell Friday evening where the train was met by a crowd of relatives and friends.  The remains were taken to the home of her sister, Mrs. J.M. Garrelts until Sunday afternoon when short services were held at the house and funeral services conducted by Rev. Wright, pastor of the Presbyterian Church of Ness City, were held in Brownell. The beautiful flowers which covered her casket were silent messages of love and esteem in which she was held.  Interment was made in the Vansburg Cemetery near Brownell.  Mrs. Garrelts had not been in good health for some time, yet her condition was not considered serious until Wednesday. Death was due to heart failure.

 

 

 

 


TONY GARRELTS

 

     Tony Joseph Garrelts was born near Dubuque, in Barton County, Kansas, on the 14th of June, 1882, and departed this life at the Grisell Memorial Hospital in Ransom, Kansas, after all that loving hands and medical care could do on the 2nd day of August, 1940, aged 58 years 1 month and 18 days.

      On the 26th day of May, 1908, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Barbara Milton, and to this union were born five children all of whom survive his going:  George Herbert, of Hutchinson, Kansas; Glenn Ernest, of Salina, Kansas; Gladys Maurine, Wayne Earl and Geneva Irene of the home.

      He made his home in Barton County until April, 1917, when he moved with his family to Crowley, Colo., where he resided until the time of his wife’s death in 1924, when he moved to Ness County, and on the 3rd day of August, 1927, moved to his farm west of Ransom where he resided until the time of his death.

      He transferred his membership from the Crowley Presbyterian Church in Crowley, Colo., to the Brownell Methodist Church and then to the Ransom Methodist Church, of which he has been a most faithful and loyal member, with a kindly and cheery smile and word of encouragement for his pastors and a prayer for the success of his church in the work of  His Lord.

      His wife’s death on the 2nd day of October, 1924, left him to be both mother and father to his children, and none can say but that he did this great task both cheerfully and well.

      His greatest aim was to make the best home possible for them and in all things his children were first in his thought.  He was a kind and loving father and will be sadly missed by his family.

      Besides his children he leaves to mourn his passing, two sisters, Mrs. Anna Lubbers, of Ensign, Kansas, and Mrs. Effie Hammerstead, of Santa Ana, California; one brother, John, of Brownell, a number of nieces and nephews and a host of friends.

      Funeral services were held at the Ransom Methodist Church, Sunday afternoon.  Pallbearers were:  Clinton Scherzinger, Will Baer, Fred Amstutz, Ira Stutzman, Maurice Dubbs and Will Schweitzer.  Burial was made in the Ransom Cemetery.

 

Ness Co. News, Aug. 8, 1940

 


GLENN GARTEN

 

      Memorial graveside services for Glenn Garten will be held at the Ransom Cemetery Saturday, March 22, at 1:30 p.m.

      Glenn Garten was born April 18, 1918, in Commanche County.

      He attended schools in Plains and graduated from Ft. Hays Kansas State College.  He was a music teacher in several Kansas towns, teaching in Ransom for two years from 1939-41.  While teaching in Ransom, he met and married Vera Miller, daughter of early Ransom pioneers Lee and Helen (Curtis) Miller.

      After leaving Ransom, Glenn and Vera farmed in Kansas and Genoa, Colo.  He later was a licensed real estate agent in Colorado Springs.  He died at his home Jan. 30, 1997.  Survivors include his wife, Vera of Foster City, Calif.; a daughter, Gay Innis of Belmont, Calif.; and sisters, Faye Dickey of Indianapolis, Ind. and Merle Batman of Meade.  He was preceded in death by a son, Adrian Vaughn Nov. 22, 1958.  He will be buried in the family lot in the Ransom Cemetery.

 

Ness Co. News, March 13, 1997

 

 

OBITUARY

 

      Glenn Clayton Garten was born on a farm south of Coldwater, Kansas, on April 18, 1917.  His parents were Reed A. and Zella Garten.  He had one older brother, Kenneth, and two sisters, Faye Dickey and Merle Batman.  The family moved to Plains, Kansas where he attended high school.  He had a beautiful baritone voice and received a music scholarship in a contest at Fort Hays State College in Hays, Kansas.  He attended Fort Hays and graduated with a music major in 1939.  While he was there he sang in the college glee club, played in the college band, and was a member of the choir at First Presbyterian Church.

      After graduating from college, he was hired as a high school music teacher in Ransom, Kansas.  There he met the home economics teacher, Vera Mae Miller, and they were married on August 29, 1940.  He taught for another year at Ransom and then two more years in Arlington, Kansas.  While teaching in Arlington, they had their first child, a boy whom they named Vaughn.

      After much consideration he left teaching and returned to his first love, farming.  He went to Plains to help his father, but since there was no land for sale in that area, he, Vera, Vaughn, and a new baby daughter, Glenna Gay, moved to a farm close to Genoa, Colorado where they lived from 1945 until 1971.   During that time he sometimes served as music teacher and superintendent at the Genoa Public School, was a member of the Genoa Lions Club, was a member and choir director of the Genoa Evangelical United Brethren Church, and started an Easter Cantata that became a tradition in the community.  At one time it had as many as 100 community singers.

      Glenn and Vera lost their son, Vaughn, in an automobile accident in 1958.  That tragedy and a desire to try a new profession, led to the eventual sale of the farm and a move to Colorado Springs.  There he dealt in real estate until they moved to California to be near their daughter and son-in-law, James E. Innis, in July, 1984.  The time in California was busy with Lion’s Club, SIRS, The First Presbyterian Church of Menlo Park, family, friends, and traveling.

      All of his life reflected his values of family, honesty, integrity, community service, and love.  He died peacefully at home on January 30, 1997.  He had asked to be cremated and have his ashes buried next to his son Vaughn’s grave, in Ransom, Kansas.  He is survived by his wife, Vera, his daughter, Gay, his sisters, Faye and Merle, and his nieces, Charlee, Diane, Janet, Bonnie, and nephews, John and Kim and their families.

 

Obituary read at graveside service.

 

 


VAUGHN GARTEN

 

     Vaughn Garten, age 16, was killed Saturday evening near Arriba, Colo., in a car accident.  He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Garten and grandson of Mrs. Helen Miller of Ransom.  Mr. Garten was music teacher at the Ransom High School in the early 1940’s.  

 

Ness Co. News, Nov. 27, 1958

 

 

OBITUARY

 

      Adrian Vaughn Garten was born June 24, 1942, at Hutchinson, Kansas.  His short life ended November 22, 1958.  Vaughn was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Garten and is survived by his parents and sister, Gay.

      His interests were many.  He joined the Evangelical United Brethern Church at Genoa, Colo., on April 11, 1954.  He was a leader in the youth work of his church locally and in the district.  He was active in 4-H, loved music and sports, but his prime interest was the farm and working with his father.  His happy disposition and sense of responsibility made him a favorite of all, both young and old.

      His life will be an influence for more good than can be known about.  His parents can be comforted in knowing that through their efforts and guidance, Vaughn had become the kind of young man that earned and deserved every privilege and responsibility given him.

      Besides his parents and sister, he leaves to mourn his loss:  His grandmothers, Mrs. L.C. Miller of Ransom, and Mrs. R.A. Garten of Plains; also four aunts, Mrs. Henry R. Daily of San Antonio, Texas, Fern Miller of Denver, Colo., Mrs. Richard Batman of Meade,  Mrs. Otis M. Dickey of Grosse Pointe, Mich; one uncle, Kenneth D. Garten of Limon, Colo.; along with 11 cousins and a host of other relatives and friends.

      Graveside services were held at the Ransom Cemetery on Wednesday, November 26.

 

Ness Co. News, Dec. 4, 1958


DELILAH GIDDINGS

 

      Died: - At her home west of Ransom, Sunday, December 7, 1902, after a brief illness, Lilla, wife of John A. Giddings, aged about forty-three years.  The remains were interred in the Ransom Cemetery Tuesday, December 9.

 

Ness Co. News, Dec. 13, 1902

 

 

In Memoriam.

 

Written from the National Military Home at Leavenworth, Kansas, by Uncle Hardy Bobbitt.

--

Delilah A. Giddings, the late loving wife

Of a kinsman who is near and dear,

Has passed to the realms of that better life-

Gone to dwell with the angels up there.

 

Husband, four daughters, and two sons,

And with them are many another,

Who in sympathy weep with the stricken ones

For the loss of that dear sainted mother.

 

Yes, ‘tis night in that once happy home,

All is wrapt in the mantle of woe,

And the winter must go, and bright flowers come,

Ere the sorrowing tears cease to flow.

 

Almost three decades have passed since the day

When we first saw her bright smiling face,

And noted the brisk but quiet way

She was filling a dead mother’s place.

 

She was scarce in her teens, and yet like a sage,

She was soothing a father’s deep grief,

And brothers and sisters, without reference to age,

In their troubles sought her for relief.

 

The playtime of childhood to her never come

Nor the long toil-earned rest of the old,

But her labor of love for the dear ones of home

Can by pen, or tongue never be told.

 

Dear Father, our faith, keep it ever unshaken,

And from murmuring wonder when we are bereft

Why the good and the useful and dearest are taken,

And we who are selfish and useless are left.

 

Ness Co. News, Jan. 10, 1903

 

(Delilah Giddings and her baby were later disinterred and moved to the Arnold, Ks. Cemetery)
ARTHUR GIFFIN

 

      Arthur N. Giffin, 87, a native of the McCracken community, passed away at a nursing home at St. Francis Saturday, June 16.  He had been a resident of the home the past year and a half.

      Born at McCracken April 25, 1886, he had lived there the greater part of his life.  He had resided in Ness City and later in Ransom for several years before moving to St. Francis.

      He was a veteran of World War I.

      Funeral services were held at St. Francis Tuesday morning, June 19, and in the afternoon from the Fitzgerald Funeral Home here with interment being in the Ransom Cemetery with graveside services presented by the Ransom VFW.

      Survivors include the widow, Mrs. Clara Giffin of St. Francis; two step-sons, Keith Lloyd and Gaylord Lloyd, both of St. Francis; along with other relatives and friends.

 

Ness Co. News, June 21, 1973

 

 

 

 


NEWTON GIFFIN

 

     Newton T. Giffin, 77, former Ness City merchant and brother of Arthur Giffin of Ransom, passed away at LaCrosse on Sunday, April 22.  He had been ill for several days.

      Mr. Giffin lived in this community for many years, first on a farm southeast of Ness City, and then here where he and his mother, Mrs. M.L. Haag, operated the Southside Market for several years.

      Funeral services were held from the Fitzgerald Funeral Home Tuesday afternoon, April 24, conducted by Dr. Armour H. Evans.  Interment was in the Ransom Cemetery.

      Survivors, besides the brother, include distant relatives and many friends.

 

Ness Co. News, Apr. 26, 1962

 

 

OBITUARY

 

      Newton Tibbet Giffin, son of Newton H. Giffin and Mrs. Mariam L. Haag, was born at Galva, Kansas, November 8, 1883, and passed away at the Rush County Memorial Hospital, LaCrosse, April 22, 1962, following a heart attack.

      At the age of three years, he moved with his parents to the site that is now known as McCracken, living in that community all of his young manhood.  The later years of his active life were spent with his mother, Mrs. Haag, on her farm south of Ness City.  He then moved with her to Ness City, operating the Southside Market until his mother’s death in 1951.

      He spent the last several years in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Rolly Mills at LaCrosse.

      Survivors are his brother, Arthur Giffin of Ransom; cousins Roy Leighton of Butte, Mont., Bill Griffith of Minneapolis, Minn., May Middleton of Elkhart, and J.E. Combest of Ransom; other relatives and friends.

 

Ness Co. News, May 3, 1962

 

 

 


 

MYRTLE GLASS

 

     Mrs. Myrtle Glass, 76, long time Ness City resident, passed away at the Grisell Memorial Hospital at Ransom on Monday, March 3.  She had been in poor health for some time, and seriously ill for several days.

      Funeral services were held on Wednesday afternoon, March 5, 2:30 o’clock from the Fitzgerald Funeral Home here, conducted by Rev. Jona Unruh, pastor of the First Baptist Church.  Interment was in the Ransom Cemetery.

      Survivors include a daughter, Mrs. Frances Huss of San Diego, Calif., three sisters, Mrs. D.B. Delaney of Ness City, Mrs. Frank Wood of Tribune, and Mrs. Nola Pickerill of Kansas City, Mo.; a brother, Albert Stevens of Ness City; two grandchildren; other relatives and friends.

     

Ness Co. News, March 6, 1958

 

 

OBITUARY

 

      Myrtle Rosetta, daughter of Mahlon and Ellen Stevens, was born on October 16, 1882, at Olney, Ill.  She departed this life on March 3, 1958, at the Sterling Community Hospital, Sterling, Kansas, at the age of 75 years, 4 months and 15 days.

      She came to Kansas from Illinois with her father and mother and family in 1885.

      In 1905, she married P.H. Harkness and to this union was born one daughter, Frances.  Mr. Harkness passed away in 1923.

      In 1925 she married Rev. P.T. Glass, who passed away in 1939.

      In 1926 she was united with the First Baptist Church of Ness City, where she continued to serve until her final illness.  She was a near lifetime citizen of the Ness City community.

      Mrs. Glass was a good mother, a good neighbor and friend.  She loved her home and family and she loved her church.

      She leaves to mourn her passing one daughter, Mrs. Frances Huss of San Diego, Calif.; two granddaughters, Katharine and Myrtle; three sisters, Mrs. Frank Woods of Tribune, Mrs. May Delaney of Ness City, and Mrs. Nola Pickerill of Kansas City, Mo., and one brother, Albert Stevens of Ness City.

      Besides her family she will be missed by a great host of friends.

      Funeral services were held from the Fitzgerald Funeral Home here on Wednesday, March 5, conducted by Rev. Jona Unruh, pastor of the First Baptist Church.  Interment was in the Ransom Cemetery.

 

Ness Co. News, March 13, 1958

 

 


ELLA GLAZIER

 

     Mrs. Ella Glazier, 53, formerly of Ransom, passed away at Wichita on  Tuesday, November 1.  Although complete funeral arrangements had not been announced Wednesday morning, they will be held Friday afternoon, November 4, with Fitzgerald’s of Ness City in charge.  The remains were brought here late Tuesday.

 

Ness Co. News, Nov. 3, 1960

 

 

OBITUARY

 

      Ella Rebecca Jarvis Glazier was born to Caleb and Liddy Jarvis, February 23, 1897, in Trego County, and departed from this life November 1, 1960, in Wichita at the age of 63 years, 8 months and 23 days.

      When she was three years old the family moved to the farm southwest of Ransom.  She grew to young womanhood there, helping to care for a family of eight brothers and sisters and attending Bellview and Ransom High School.

      She was united in marriage on September 15, 1917, to James Wilbur Glazier.  They established their first home at Hutchinson and two of their four children were born there.  There are two sons and two daughters.

      In 1920 they moved to Ransom and made Ransom their home, moving to Kress, Texas, six years ago.

      Many of her friends will remember her work at the Ransom Hospital where she worked as a nurses aid.

      At Columbus, Ohio, in 1932, she was baptized as a Jehovah Witness and spent he remaining years a faithful witness.

      Ella Glazier departed from this life in Wichita, Kansas, after an illness of three and a half weeks.  Her passing left a place in the heart of her family that will never be filled.  Her grandchildren were a great pleasure, and her ninety-four year old father was always close to her heart.

      She leaves to mourn her husband, Wilbur of Kress, Texas; her children, Gene Vincent Glazier, Mr. and Mrs. Logan Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Millard Blunt, and Mr. and Mrs. Laverne Glazier; nine grandchildren; her father, Caleb Jarvis of Ransom and five brothers and sisters-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Bill Jarvis of Arnold, Mr. and Mrs. Lee Jarvis of Arnold, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Jarvis of Wichita, Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Jarvis of Ness City, Mr. and Mrs. Vernon Jarvis of Ransom; three sisters and two brothers-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Frye of Arnold, Mrs. Maye Herbel of Wilson, Mr. and Mrs. Harold McNinch of Arnold; 17 nieces and nephews and a host of other relatives and friends.

      The Dodge City congregation conducted the funeral November 4, 1960, from the Methodist Church in Ransom.  Interment was in the Ransom Cemetery.

 

Ness Co. News, Nov. 10, 1960

 


 

EUGENE GLAZIER

 

      Word was received that Gene V. Glazier of Benton City, Wash., passed away at his home Sunday evening, Aug. 23.  Funeral services will be Wednesday in Prosser, Wash., with burial later in the Ransom Cemetery.  Gene was formerly of Ransom.

 

Ness Co. News, Aug. 27, 1987

 

 

 

 


WILBUR GLAZIER

 

      Wilbur J. Glazier, 89, long time Ransom community resident before moving to Jetmore two years ago, passed away there Monday, July 14.

      Born March 28, 1891, in Haskell County, he married Ella Jarvis in 1917.  She died in November of 1960.

      He was a retired blacksmith and was a member of Jehovah’s Witnesses in Jetmore.

      Funeral services were held Thursday morning, July 17, from the Fitzgerald Funeral Home here with interment made in the Ransom Cemetery.

      Survivors include:  sons, Eugene of Benton City, Wash., and Laverne of Wichita; daughters, Mrs. Logan Smith of Bunker Hill, Mrs. Millard Blunt of Hesperia, Calif.; a sister Mrs. Myrtle O’Neal of Vernal, Utah; nine grandchildren.

 

Ness Co. News, July 24, 1980

 

 

 

 


ARLANDO GOODVIN

 

      A.D. Goodvin was born in Daviess County, Mo., August 27, 1879, and passed away September 22, 1951, at his home in Wichita, Kansas, at the age of 72 years and 26 days.

      He came to Kansas when a small child, settled on a farm near Ransom, Kansas, where he grew to manhood.  He was a faithful member of the church of Christ since early manhood.

      He was married to Sadie Wagner October 7, 1903.  To this union were born five children.  He was a loving husband, father and grandfather.

      He leaves to mourn his passing, his faithful wife, Sadie; his children, Mrs. Stella Shutt, Isaac, Bryan, and Wayne Goodvin of Wichita, and Cline of Fort Worth, Texas; a son-in-law; three daughters-in-law; and 16 grandchildren.  One daughter-in-law preceded him in death.  Also mourning his passing are his five sisters:  Mrs. Dora Beamer of Larned, Mrs. Mollie Barber of Pueblo, Colo., Mrs. Laura Osborn, Mrs. Bertha Scott, and Mrs. Ida Conard of Ransom and their families, and a host of other relatives and friends.

      Out-of-town people attending funeral services at Ransom Monday, other than the family, were:  Mrs. Alice Smith and Blanche McMillon of Dighton; Mr. and Mrs. Ross Beamer of Oakley; Mr. and Mrs. Clare Brewer of WaKeeney; Mr. and Mrs. Edd Cranston of Ness City; Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Rickart and Nancy, Mrs. Verna Lewis, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Selig, Mr. and Mrs. Virgil Beamer, Mr. and Mrs. John Beamer, and Mrs. Thayne Beamer and children, all of Larned.

 

Ness Co. News, Sept. 27, 1951

 

      Funeral services for A.D. Goodvin were held last Monday afternoon from the church of Christ in Ransom.  Bro. Raymond McDaniel delivered a comforting sermon.  Singers were:  Mildred Clark, Bessie Rogers, Dorothy McDaniel, Chloe Horchem, Junior Clawson, Ronald Horchem and Ward Scott.  Pall bearers were Tommy Rickart, Nathan Carroll, Robert Scott, Nay Combest, John Petty and Harold Petty.

      Lando had a lot of friends, both at Ransom and at Wichita.  His jolly, friendly ways won people to him.  He is well known in Ransom, having lived there for a number of years.  He was married there and his five children were born there.  The last few years he lived in Wichita.  It was his wish to be brought back home for burial and be buried beside his parents, Mr. and Mrs. I.N. Goodvin.  The many beautiful flowers were a token of the high esteem in which he was held by all who knew him.

 

Ness Co. News, Oct. 4, 1951

 

 


I.N. GOODVIN

 

      I.N. Goodvin died at his home in Ransom, Kansas, Tuesday morning, November 30, 1920, aged 77 years, two months and 28 days.  Death came to him after several weeks of intense suffering.

      Before he was stricken with his last illness, Mr. Goodvin prepared for the Record a story of his life, to be used in its columns when he should answer the summons of the Grim Reaper, but thru a misunderstanding, it was taken to the country and rendered unavailable for publication.  The following is from notes gathered by a friend:

      In the passing of Mr. Goodvin, Ransom loses one of her most beloved and respected citizens.  Of him can be truly spoken that highest of all compliments, he was a good man; all who have been associated with him in any way, testify to his conscientious, every day Christian life, he did the right as he saw it.  He was a familiar figure in the affairs of Ransom, a politician, soldier and a Christian, he took a prominent part in affairs of church and state and local enterprise.  He will be greatly missed and sincerely mourned by a host of friends.

      I.N. Goodvin was born in Illinois, September 2, 1843, removing to Missouri when still quite young.  He was in the Missouri state militia three years and one year in the U.S. army, 43rd Regiment, Co. F. Missouri.  He became converted in 1868 and was baptized into the church of Christ by Rev. Benjamin Lockhart, later becoming himself a minister of the Gospel.  On April 16, 1871, he was united in marriage with Miss Nancy Ann Cline and of this union were born nine children, six of whom, with the faithful companion of nearly fifty years, still survive him.  He came with his family to the Cyrus neighborhood about thirty-five years ago, and has made this his home most of the time since.  He was elected to the state legislature by the People’s Party and was the first representative sent from Ness County by the “Pops.”  When that party came to its political end Mr. Goodvin became a Democrat and his last trip down town was made on November 2, to cast his ballot.

      He is survived by his wife, and six children; Mrs. John Beamer, of Parker, Kansas; Mrs. Fred Barber, of Kutch, Colorado; A.D. Goodvin, Mrs. George Osborn, Mrs. Charles Scott and Mrs. Lyman Conard, of Ransom; a sister and brother, both of Jamesport, Missouri; several grandchildren and other relatives.

      Funeral services were conducted, Wednesday afternoon, at the church of Christ, by the pastor, J.M. Briggs, and interrment made in the Ransom Cemetery.

 

Ransom Record, December 2, 1920


I.N. GOODVIN

     

      I.N. Goodvin died at his home in Ransom, Kansas, Tuesday morning, November 30, 1920, aged 77 years, two months and 28 days.  Death came to him after several weeks of intense suffering.

      Before he was stricken with his last illness, Mr. Goodvin prepared for the Record a story of his life, to be used in its columns when he should answer the summons of the Grim Reaper, but through a misunderstanding it was taken to the country and rendered unavailable for publication.  The following is from notes gathered by a friend.

      In the passing of Mr. Goodvin, Ransom loses one of her most beloved and respected citizens.  Of him can be truly spoken that highest of all compliments, he was a good man; all who have been associated with him in any way, testify to his conscientious, everyday Christian life; he did the right as he saw it.  He was a familiar figure in the affairs of Ransom, a politician, a soldier and a Christian; he took a prominent part in affairs of church, state and local enterprise.  He will be greatly missed by a host of friends.

      I.N. Goodvin was born in Illinois, September 2, 1843, removing to Missouri when still quite young.  He was in the Missouri state militia three years and one year in the U.S. army, 43rd Regiment, Co. F. Missouri.  He became converted in 1868 and was baptized into the church of Christ by Rev. Benjiman Lockhart, later becoming himself a minister of the Gospel.  On April 16, 1871, he was united in marriage with Miss Nancy Ann Cline and of this union were born nine children, six of whom, with the faithful companion of nearly fifty years, still survive him.  He came with his family to the Cyrus neighborhood about thirty-five years ago, and has made this his home most of the time since.  He was elected to the state legislature by the People’s Party and was the first representative sent from Ness County by the “Pops.”  When that party came to its political end, Mr. Goodvin became a Democrat and his last trip to town was made on November 2, to cast his ballot.

      He is survived by his wife, and six children:  Mrs. Fred Barber, of Kutch, Colorado; Mrs. John Beamer, of Parker, Kansas; A.D. Goodvin, Mrs. George Osborn, Mrs. Charles Scott and Mrs. Lyman Conard, of Ransom; a sister and a brother, both of Jamesport, Missouri; several other grandchildren and relatives.

      Funeral services were conducted Wednesday afternoon, at the church of Christ, by the pastor, J.M. Briggs, and interment in the Ransom Cemetery.

 

Ness Co. News, Dec. 4, 1920


I.N. GOODVIN

 

      I.N. Goodvin was born in Pike Co. Ill., Sep. 2, 1843.  Died at Ransom, Kans. Nov. 30, 1920, at the age of 77 years, 2 months and 28 days.

      His father and mother, with a family of 10 children, drove from Pike Co. to McClean Co., Ill. in 1850.  From there, with two or three neighbors, he started in May to look at the Kansas Territory, but he took sick and died before he reached his destination.  The mother and children, in 1858, drove from their home to find a new home in the west and landed in Daviess Co., Mo., where they made a home.  I.N. seemed to be more progressive than any of the rest of the family and moved on west and settled in Ness Co., Kansas, in 1886.

      Bro. Goodvin and Nancy A. Cline were united in marriage April 16, 1871, and enjoyed each other in wedded life 49 years, 7 months and 14 days, almost reaching the golden days of wedded life.  To this union nine children were born.  Three have departed.

      When the south rebelled against the government - Bro. Goodvin volunteered as a soldier and did what he could to put down that rebellion.

      Bro. Goodvin was a member of the State Legislature of Kansas, from  1891 - 1893.  He engaged in business some, but his chief earthly calling was a tiller of the soil and at different times has been the owner of farms in Ness and Trego Counties.

      But, notwithstanding all this, the supreme effort of his life was that part of it that was Christian.  He obeyed the gospel, at the hands of Benjamin Lockhart, in Sept. 1868.  For a number of years he was a gospel preacher.  Much of his Christian work was done at Cyrus, where he with some other pioneers planted the cause of Christ and where he was one of the elders for about thirty years.  Thus an active life, in many ways, has come to an earthly end.  He leaves his life’s companion, six children, Arlando, Dora Beamer, Mollie Barber, Laura Osborn, Bertha Scott, and Ida Conard, a brother, Sam J. Goodvin of Jamesport, Mo., a sister living at the same place, Mrs. Malissa Royston, 21 grandchildren and 7 grand-grandchildren, a host of friends and many brethren.

      The companion has lost a faithful husband, the children a kind parent, the community, a helpful citizen, the church an active worker and the government a loyal citizen.

 

Hand written copy of 

I.N. Goodvin obituary

(in posession of his grandson, Robert Scott)


NANCY GOODVIN

      Nancy A. Clyne was born near Des Moines, Iowa, June 15, 1843, and departed this life at her home in Ransom, Kansas, Sept. 18, 1926, age 83 years, 3 months and 3 days.

      She was united in marriage to Isaac Goodvin April 16, 1871, enjoying each other in wedded life 49 years, 7 months and 14 days.

      Nine children were born to them; Dora Beamer of Dighton, Kansas; Mollie Barber of Penrose, Colorado; Arlando Goodvin, Laura Osborn, Bertha Scott, and Ida Conard all of Ransom.  One son Daniel, died at the age of 22 years and two died in infancy.  She also leaves one sister of Seattle, Washington, and two brothers; Alex Clyne of Port Orchard, Washington, and Polk Clyne of Larned, Kansas, 22 grandchildren, and 14 great grandchildren.

      She united with the church of Christ in early life and was a faithful devout member thereof until death.  A good mother, a true friend, a loyal citizen and a generous soul has left us.  She fought a good fight, her course is now ended, and there is laid up for her a crown of life, which her Lord will give her at that day.

Ransom Record September 23, 1926

 

GOODVIN FUNERAL

 

      In spite of lowering skies and drizzling rain a large number gathered at the church of Christ Sunday, September 19th to pay their last respects to Mrs. Nancy Goodvin.  Music was furnished by the choir from the church of Christ who sang beautifully as the casket was borne into the church.  One of the songs “Just Beyond the Jordan River” was sung at the funeral of Mr. Goodvin.  Rev. James Briggs conducted the services and delivered a very effective address on the subject of “Immortality”, presenting in a clear manner the view of the Atheist who looks on death as the wreck of life, the Philosopher as a faint hope that love must triumph while the Scientist makes of it all a mystery and only the Gospel of Christ contains the glorious hope and promise of resurrection.  The scripture read was the last chapter of Proverbs, describing a virtuous wife and mother.  The casket was covered with beautiful floral tributes given by relatives and friends.  Interment was made in the Ransom Cemetery beside the husband who had proceeded her in death.

 

Ransom Record September 30, 1926

 


SADIE GOODVIN

 

      Funeral services for Mrs. Arlando Goodvin of Wichita were held Monday afternoon at the church of Christ with burial in the Ransom Cemetery.  She is a sister-in-law of Mrs. Bertha Scott, Mrs. George Osborn and Mrs. Ida Conard.

 

Ness Co. News, Dec. 1, 1955

 

 

 

 


LUCY GOSS

 

OBITUARY

 

     Lucy (Schoeppel) Goss, 88, died Thursday, January 14, 1993 from heart failure in Maple Plain, MN.  She was born March 6, 1904 at Ransom, the daughter of George John and Anna Schoeppel.  Lucy married Ray Evermond Goss August 6, 1928 at Seattle, WA.  He died October 3, 1978.

      Lucy attended grade and high school at Ransom and taught school at Nonchalanta before attending the University of Nebraska.  When her sister, Elizabeth graduated from the university and left for Oregon, Lucy went with her.  She got a job teaching in Dallas, OR where she met her future husband, Ray, who was a pharmacist.

      After their marriage they moved to Forks, WA and opened a drug store which they operated until 1946.  They sold the store and their home and spent almost a year traveling with a trailer.  They settled in Apache Junction, AZ where they built a desert adobe home.  Ray worked as a prescription pharmacist and Lucy assisted him.  They took time to do considerable traveling and after retiring in 1965 they spent a year exploring Europe, living for six months in Tenerife, Canary Islands.  They spent five months traveling in South America during 1968-69.

      They moved to Atascadero, CA in 1971.  In 1972 they enrolled as students aboard the Chapman College World Campus for a five month around-the-world study cruise.  They were the oldest students.

      During their years in Forks, Lucy and Ray collected artifacts and basketry of the Northwest Indian tribes and the Eskimos  They continued to add to their collection.  Ray was an excellent photographer, taking many beautiful pictures during their travels and especially of their favorite part of the country, the great Northwest.  In 1977 Lucy and Ray gave their entire collection to the Cuesta College Museum in San Luis Obispo, CA.

      Lucy is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Mabel Russell, Seal Beach, CA and Mrs. Daisy Jacobus, Santa Monica, CA and by six nieces and nephews.  There will be a memorial service later.

 

Ness Co. News, Feb. 4, 1993

 


CLARA GRAF

 

      Mrs. Clara I. Graf, 63, a long time resident of Ransom, passed away at Abilene Thursday, December 29.

      Born Clara Schlitter at Loretta December 5, 1914, she married Isidor Graf January 23, 1940, at Ransom.  She had lived at Ransom since.  Her husband died November 22, 1965.

      She was a member of the St. Aloysius Catholic Church, and of the Daughters of Isabella, both of Ransom.

      Funeral services were held from the church Monday morning, January 2, conducted by the pastor, Msgr. George Stewart.  Interment was in the St. Aloysius Cemetery at Ransom.

      Survivors include a daughter, Mrs. Eleanor Lauxman of Abilene; sons, Eugene Graf of Fort Riley, and Elmer Graf of Ashdown, Ark.; sisters, Mrs. Veronica Pfannenstiel of Hoisington, and Mrs. Mary Bass of California; brothers, Linus Schlitter of Dagsboro, Del., Anthony Schlitter of Milton, Del., Raymond Schlitter of Hays, Daniel Schlitter of Great Bend, and Frank Schlitter of Watsonville, Calif.; eight grandchildren, other relatives and friends.

 

Ness Co. News, Jan. 5, 1978

 

 

 


ISIDOR GRAF

 

     Isidor Graf, 59, well known Ransom businessman, passed away at the hospital there on Monday, November 15.  He had been in poor health for the past several months and seriously ill in recent weeks.

      He was born at Munjor on December 14, 1905, and moved to the Ransom community in 1937.  He operated the Graf Produce in Ransom since opening the business shortly after moving to that town.

      He was married to Immaculate Schletter on January 27, 1940, at Ransom.  They had made their home there since.

      He was a member of the St. Aloysius Catholic Church in Ransom, and of the Ransom Knights of Columbus.  He was always active in civic activities of his community.

      Rosary was said at the Fitzgerald Funeral Home here on Wednesday evening, November 17, 7:30 o’clock.  Funeral services will be held from the St. Aloysius Church in Ransom Thursday morning, November 18, 9:00 o’clock, conducted by the pastor, Fr. Cornelius Leunissen.  Interment will be in the St. Aloysius Cemetery with Fitzgerald’s in charge.

      Survivors include:  The widow, Mrs. Immaculate Graf of the home; a daughter, Eleanor Graf of the home; two sons, Eugene Graf of the Army presently stationed at Stuttgart, Germany, and Elmer Graf of the home; three sisters, Sister M. Roberts of Tulsa, Okla., Mrs. Ira Brown of Minneola, and Mrs. Elmer Pfannenstiel of Dodge City; five brothers, Peter Graf of Ness City, Alexander Graf of El Monte, Calif., Alban Graf of Pratt, Aloysius Graf of Omaha, Nebr., and Edwin Graf of Great Bend; other relatives and many friends.

 

Ness Co. News, Sept. 18, 1965

 

 

 


BERTHA GRAHAM

 

     Bertha Dubbs Graham died Wednesday, December 24, 1997.  She was born in Ransom, February 19, 1902, the youngest of the three children of Mollie Curtis and Louis Burdette Dubbs.

      She married Rexford Guipre of Simpson in 1921.  In their early married life they co-founded the Mid-West Stages, the first bus line to run north/south regularly through Ransom and Ness City.

      Bertha and Rexford had two children, Frances Jean and Curtis Rex.  After the death of her husband in 1930, she and her children lived in Ransom where she helped her father in his grocery store.

      She is preceded in death by parents, Rexford , Curtis Rex, a sister, Netta Curry, a brother, Charles Edward Dubbs, and Harold Graham, also a Ransom native who she married in 1976.  They enjoyed 12 years together in Falls Church, VA.

      For the last 10 years Bertha has been living with her daughter in Gulf Breeze, FL.

      Survivors include her daughter, Jean, grandson, Greg and wife, Linda, granddaughters, Zantha and Heather, and six great-grandsons, Rian, Matthew, Yasha, Eli, Tyler and Cory.

      A memorial service will be held in Ransom at a later date.

 

Ness Co. News, Jan. 1, 1998

 

 

OBITUARY

     Graveside memorial services for Ransom native, Bertha (Dubbs) Graham will be held Saturday, July 25, at the Ransom Kansas Cemetery, 10:30 a.m.

      Bertha Mae Dubbs was born in Ransom, February 19, 1902, the youngest of three children born to Louis Burdette (Burd) and Mollie Priestley (Curtis) Dubbs.  She was a life-long member of the United Methodist Church placing her membership at Ransom on July 27, 1913.  She attended schools in Ransom, graduating from the Ransom High School in 1919.

      Following high school, Bertha attended Kansas State Agricultural College in Manhattan, where she met Fred Rexford Guipre of Simpson.  They were married August 24, 1921.  In their early married life they cofounded the Mid-West Stages with her sister Netta and husband Torrance Curry.  This bus route was the first bus line to run north/south regularly through Ransom and Ness City, and became known in later years as the Bickel Bus Line.

      Bertha and Rexford had two children, Frances Jean and Curtis Rex.  Rexford was killed in an automobile accident in August, 1931 at which time Bertha and children moved to Ransom where she helped her father in his store, the L.B. Dubbs Mercantile.

      In 1939 Netta and Torrance moved to Port Arthur, TX for employment and Bertha and children moved with them.  While living in Port Arthur, Bertha met and married Mr. Whitaker.  Their marriage was short as a heart attack took  “Whit” four years after their marriage.

      Sorrow again struck Bertha December 14, 1945, when her son Curtis Rex was killed in an airplane accident.

      In the early 1950’s Bertha returned to Ransom to take care of her aged parents and “Uncle Charlie”.

      Upon celebrating their 50th high school reunion in 1969, Bertha renewed her friendship with former classmate, Harold “Hal” Graham.  They dated for a time, marrying in 1976.  They moved to Harold’s home at Falls Church, VA and enjoyed 12 years together before death took Harold, October 20, 1988.

      Following Harold’s death, Bertha moved to Gulf Breeze, FL to make her home with her daughter Jean and son-in-law Lyle LaFon and their family.

      Bertha passed away peacefully on Wednesday, December 24, 1997 at the age of 95 years, 9 months and 5 days.

      Although Bertha lived in many places during her life, she always held on to her roots-her heritage, through her memories and the land that had been homesteaded by her grandparents, Albert Moses and Margaret Elizabeth (Aller) Dubbs.  Her pastures and crops held her heart and were so much enjoyment to her.  It is this heritage that she was proud to share and pass on to her daughter, grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

      Bertha was preceded in death by her parents; her son, Curtis Rex; three husbandss; her son-in-law, Lyle LaFon; her sister, Netta Curry and nephews Jack and Joe Curry; and a brother and sister-in-law, Charles and Florence Dubbs.

      Survivors include her daughter, Jean LaFon, Gulf Breeze, FL; grandson Greg and wife Linda, Gulf Breeze, FL; granddaughters, Zantha, of Marine on St. Croix, MN and Heather, of Suwanee, GA; six great-grandchildren, Rian, Matthew, Yasha, Eli, Tyler and Cory.

      The family request no flowers, but suggests memorials to the Ransom Cemetery Improvement Fund, P.O. Box 1, Ransom, KS 67572.

 

Ness Co. News, July 16, 1998

 

      Graveside memorial services for Ransom native, Bertha (Dubbs) Graham will be held Saturday, July 25, at the Ransom Kansas Cemetery, 10:30 a.m.

      Bertha Mae Dubbs was born in Ransom, February 19, 1902, the youngest of three children born to Louis Burdette (Burd) and Mollie Priestley (Curtis) Dubbs.

      Bertha passed away peacefully on Wednesday, December 24, 1997 at the age of 95 years, 9 months and 5 days.

      Bertha was preceded in death by her parents; her son, Curtis Rex; three husbands; her son-in-law, Lyle LaFon; her sister, Netta Curry and nephews Jack and Joe Curry; and a brother and sister-in-law, Charles and Florence Dubbs.

      Survivors include her daughter, Jean LaFon, Gulf Breeze, FL; grandson Greg and wife Linda, Gulf Breeze, FL; granddaughters, Zantha, of Marine on St. Croix, MN and Heather, of Suwanee, GA; six great-grandchildren, Rian, Matthew, Yasha, Eli, Tyler and Cory.

Ness Co. News, July 23, 1998


IDA GRAHAM

 

      Friday evening about 8:00 p.m. as they were on their way to the high school to attend an operetta, Mr. and Mrs. Graham were struck by a car.  Mrs. Graham died within a few minutes without regaining consciousness.  Mr. Graham was dazed and delirious for several hours.  He became conscious Saturday but with no recollection of even starting for the high school the evening before.

      The accident occurred in front of the high school building on the west crossing.  There was the usual congestion of traffic at this junction in the evening.  Mr. Francis Luetters was driving the car that struck them.  He had stopped at the Mid-West Hospital and then driven north two blocks to the BeeLine Hiway, turning west on his way home.  There were cars coming from the west and south and in order to avoid danger Mr. Luetters (who is known as a careful driver) was driving slowly close to the ditch on the north side of the trail. 

      He was watching the other cars as well as he could under their glaring headlights and did not see Mr. and Mrs. Graham until they stepped in front of his car just as he reached the crossing.  He stopped before the rear wheels had entirely cleared the crossing and ran to their assistance.  Leo Schreiber who was coming from the west on the south side of the street, was anxious about meeting so many cars at the intersection and intending to turn south.  He was from 25 to 40 feet from the crossing when the accident occurred and did not see the Grahams until the accident occurred.  He stopped at once to render assistance, and at almost the same time Mr. Floyd Lynn, who was driving to the intersection, from the south came to help.  Probably Mrs. Leo Schreiber, who was with her husband had the best opportunity of anyone to see what happened, and this account was written after talking with her and trying to understand the events as she saw them.  She saw the Grahams walk out on the crossing in front of their car and thought they must have thought the car facing them on the other side of the hiway had stopped as they showed no fear of it. 

      After the accident of course events happened so rapidly no one could get a clear idea of all that was transpiring.

      A line of cars was following rather closely each of the three cars mentioned, there was also a good many already at the high school and very soon all was confusion.  Mrs. Graham was taken to the hospital at once but expired before it was possible to do much for her.  Mr. Graham was also rushed to the hospital where he is being tenderly cared for, but he is so badly bruised the extent of his injuries is not yet determined.  He was unable to attend his wife’s funeral which was held Tuesday forenoon.  His age and the fact that he has been rather frail adds to the anxiety of his friends.

      This tragedy struck at the very foundation of our community life.  Mr. and Mrs. Graham have both been active in every cause for community betterment; they have both been members of the governing body of the city, and had a large share in shaping its public policies; both had been for years officials of the Methodist Church, and each had a part in the business life of the city.   Perhaps such an accident to no other family would have caused so great a shock to the entire community.

      We cannot understand just how or why it happened, but those most familiar with all the circumstances sympathize not only with Mr. Graham and the other bereaved relatives, but also with Francis Luetters, who we believe did his best at the time of the accident and in coming to the relief of the victims.  It was a tragedy and we feel that no one person could have been said to be responsible.  Perhaps it is incorrect to say any accident is unavoidable, however we may say in this case that unforeseen circumstances more than any individuals were to blame.

      Since the accident, it has been constantly in people’s thoughts, and the topic of conversation.  Many plans have been suggested for traffic rules and changes but we doubt if any of them would have made such a tragedy impossible.  However we shall always be glad, and now more than ever, to give space to carefully thought out plans for safety on our highways.  Until we have something better it will be wise for all of us to carefully observe all driving rules and regulations and for pedestrians to be more cautious.  “It is better to be safe than sorry.”  It is even better to be over safe (if that is possible) many times than to be sorry once.

 

Ransom Record, December 19, 1929

 

OBITUARY

 

      Ida May Hazen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Hazen, was born in Clay County, Kansas, September 28, 1878.  In 1889 the family moved to Trego County and homesteaded north and east of Ransom where they shared in the struggles of pioneer life.

      She was married to J.A. Graham on February 22, 1898.  They began life together on a farm five miles east of Utica.  In 1899 they moved to Ransom where Mr. Graham held the position of Postmaster.  In 1902 they purchased the home where they have since resided and where they have always kept open house for their friends, to their pastors and visiting ministers, thus making their home an example of rich Christian hospitality.

      On December 13, 1929 came the accident which proved fatal to Mrs. Graham and severely injured the husband.

      Besides the husband and two sons, Harold and Ralph, she is survived by her father and mother, six brothers and two sisters.

      At the age of 17 years she united with the Methodist Episcopal Church.  During her entire adult life in this community Mrs. Graham has been an example of faithful Christian living and willing service.  Outside of her own home life her interests have centered in the church and religious work.  She has taught in the Sunday School for many years, has been the efficient Superintendent of the Junior League while several groups of boys and girls have been under her training, and has been active in all departments of the Church.  She has also been a worker in the W.C.T.U. and was always loyal to the cause represented by the white ribbon.

      The life companion is lonely, other loved ones sorrow, the home is broken, her church and the entire community feel keenly the sense of loss; but while the Spirit has been taken to the Heavenly Home, the influence of a good life lives on.

      The funeral service was held in the Methodist Church Tuesday December 17th, conducted by the pastor, Rev. C.E. Hall and a former pastor, Rev. C.A. Fisher of Ellsworth.  The many beautiful flowers and the large assembly of people were expressions of the esteem in which Mrs. Graham was held by all who knew her.

      The music was furnished by a choir, representing the church at Arnold and different churches of this City, with Miss Fern Horchem at the piano.  The following songs were used; “Sometime We’ll Understand”, “The City Four Square”, “There’ll Be No Dark Valley When Jesus Comes”, and by request Mrs. Fisher very sweetly sang, “A Hymn of Consolation”.

      Relatives attending the funeral from a distance were: The sons, Harold and Ralph, of San Bernardino, California, (They also came to be with their father), Mr. and Mrs. Orlo Hazen and three children of Kam, Colo., Floyd Hazen of Springfield, Colo., George Hazen, of Roxbury, Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Marine, Mr. and Mrs. Ellis Marine, Harry Marine, Mr. and Mrs. Obenhaus and Mrs. A.J. Hazen, all of Dodge City, Mrs. A.J. Hazen, Mrs. Graham’s mother, had gone as far as Dodge City, and was visiting relatives there before going on to Arizona to spend the winter, Mr. Herbert Graham of Bremen, Indiana, a brother of A.J. Graham was here for the funeral and will remain awhile with his brother.

 

Ransom Record, December 19, 1929

 

 

 

 

No accident has ever occurred in Ransom that was more of a shock to the people here than the one which happened at the street crossing in front of the high school Friday evening of last week at about ten minutes before eight o’clock, when Mrs. J.A. Graham lost her life and Mr. Graham was severely injured, when struck by an automobile as they were crossing the road.  They were on their way to attend a high school play, and of course there were many cars on the road coming and going and in addition many were parked along the sides of the street which obstructed the view from either way and undoubtedly was a material contribution to the cause of the accident.  As they stepped out to cross the road the car coming from the east struck them, knocking them both to the ground, causing injuries from which Mrs. Graham died in a few minutes.  It is evident that the driver of the car was partially blinded by the headlights of approaching cars as several were coming from the west at the same time just a short distance away.  From statements made by those who witnessed the accident, it seems that it was, or seemed to be, unavoidable under the circumstances.  No one was speeding, but driving slow and safely it was thought, yet in some way, circumstances seemed to combine to cause this regrettable accident.

      People of Ransom are heart broken over the death of this estimable woman, this mother and friend of all, never too busy to render help to the needy and always trying to make someone’s burden lighter.  For the past four years Mrs. Graham had been employed in the L.B. Dubbs Store, where she became associated and endeared to many, especially the children of the community, in whom she always showed deep interest.  She was ever ready to take active part in the affairs of the city and community and set an example of service and self-sacrifice which is inspiring.  She was one who knew the secret of beautiful living.  The profound and heartfelt sympathy of the community is with the bereaved ones, and may we all take comfort in the thought that there is a time coming when there shall be no more death, neither sorrow nor parting.

 

OBITUARY

 

(another newspaper accounting reads the same as the copy of the Ransom Record issue with the exception of the last few paragraphs; they are as follows:)

 

      The funeral service was held in the Methodist Church on December 17, conducted by the pastor, Rev. C.E. Hall and a former pastor, Rev. C.A. Fisher, of Ellsworth.  The many beautiful flowers and the large assembly of people were expressions of the esteem in which Mrs. Graham was held by all who knew her.  The body was tenderly laid to rest in Ransom Cemetery beside that of her baby daughter gone before.

 

Unbroken was our number, a happy family band,

Ere Jesus called our loved one to dwell in Heaven’s land.

With grief our hearts are saddened, with tears our eyes do swell,

But our broken hearts still murmur,

“God doeth all things well.”

Empty is thy chamber, vacant is thy chair,

Where e’er we turn, reminders say our loved one is not there.

O, how we miss thee, loved one, mother, sister, friend,

But we hope to meet in Heaven, where earthly cares shall end.

Just a little while we’re parted,

Thou art only gone before,

Soon we’ll meet and join in praising and be parted never more.

 

 

 


J.  A.  GRAHAM

 

      J.A. Graham, an old time resident of Ness County, passed away at his home in San Bernardino, Calif., September 7, 1949.  He was born in Ohio in 1860, moved with his parents when two years old to Indiana where he grew to young manhood, from there came to Ness County, Kansas, when he was 25 years old.  His first years here were spent farming.  He later moved to Ransom, Kansas, and made that his home until 1933 when he moved to San Bernardino, Calif.  While in Ransom he was employed as postmaster and operated a feed store and elevator.

      He was united in marriage to Ida Mae Hazen in 1897.  To this union three children were born:  Harold W. Graham, of Frankfurt, Germany, Ralph F. Graham of San Diego, Calif., and a baby girl who died in infancy.  His wife, Ida, also preceded him in death.

      “Ach” as he was better known was greatly interested in the welfare of the community and especially in the growth of the church which he became a member in his young manhood and was faithful to the end.

      His sister, Miss Hattie, has been a faithful companion in his home the past 20 years.  She, as well as a host of other relatives and friends will miss his smiling face and cheery words.

 

Ness Co. News, Sept. 15, 1949

(headstone only at Ransom Cemetery, J.A. Graham buried in California)

 


JOSEPH GREEN

 

      Joseph Martin “Bud” Green, 66, of Ransom, passed away at the Grisell Memorial Hospital there early Wednesday morning, April 16.  He had been hospitalized there for nearly a month.

      The remains were brought to the Fitzgerald Funeral Home here where it will lie in state until final funeral arrangements can be made.  The tentative date for the funeral has been set for Saturday, April 19, pending information from California relatives.

      Survivors in the immediate family include the widow, Mrs. Maude Green of Ransom; four daughters, Mrs. Lloyd Ummel of Ransom, Mrs. Pauline Smith of Broomfield, Colo., Mrs. Tony Marroney of San Leandro, Calif., and Mrs. Raymond Hein of Derby, Colo.; three sons, Clyde Green of Arcadel, Calif., Orville Green of Sheridan, Wyo., and Donald Green of Wichita; other relatives and friends.

 

Ness Co. News, Apr. 17, 1958

 

 

 

OBITUARY

 

      Joseph Martin Green was born May 4, 1891 at Brownell, Kan.  He departed this life April 16, 1958, at the age of 66 years, 11 months, and 20 days, at Grisell Memorial Hospital in Ransom after an illness of nearly a month.

      He was united in marriage June 19, 1912 to Maude E. Likes in Cherokee, Okla.  Four sons and four daughters were born to this union.

      Most of his  married life was spent in Kansas with the exception of five or six years in Nebraska, where he owned and operated a shoe shop.

      “Bud” as he was called by his friends, was baptized into Christ June 5, 1952 and had been a faithful member of the Ransom church of Christ.

      He was preceded in death by his parents, two brothers, two sisters and one son, George Clayton, who died in infancy.

      He is survived by his wife, Maude; his daughters, Mrs. Mildred Ummel of Ransom, Mrs. Pauline Smith of Broomfield, Colo., Mrs. Virginia Marooney of San Leandro, Calif., and Delores Hein of Derby, Colo.; his sons, Clyde Green of Arcata, Calif., Orville Green of Sheridan, Wyo., and Donald Green of Wichita, Kan.; 15 grandchildren and a host of other relatives and friends.

      Funeral services were held from the Ransom church of Christ, Saturday afternoon, April 19, 2:30 o’clock, conducted by Lewis Stowe, pastor.  Interment was in the Ransom Cemetery with Fitzgerald’s of Ness City in charge.

 

Ness Co. News, Apr. 24, 1958

 

 

 


MAUDE GREEN

 

      Maude Erma Green, 99, died Saturday, Feb. 13, 1993, at the Grisell Long Term Care Center in Ransom.

      Born Aug. 29, 1893, near Ransom, she married Joseph Martin Green, June 19, 1912, at Cherokee, Okla.  He died April 16, 1958.

      A resident of the Ransom community most of her life, she was a cook for many years at Grisell Memorial Hospital.  She was a member of the Ransom church of Christ.

      She is survived by two sons, Donald of Memphis, Tenn. and Clyde of Manteca, Calif.; three daughters, Pauline Smith Wilson of Broomfield, Colo.; Virginia Marroney of San Leandro, Calif. and Delores Sloat of Ripon, Calif.; 19 grandchildren; 37 great-grandchildren; and several great, great-grandchildren.

      The funeral will be Thursday afternoon, Feb. 18, at the Ransom church of Christ with her son, Donald D. Green, of the church of Christ, East Frayser, Memphis, Tenn., presiding.  Burial will be in the Ransom Cemetery.

 

Ness Co. News, Feb. 18, 1993

 

 

OBITUARY

 

      Maude Erma Likes was born on a farm northeast of Ransom August 29, 1893 and departed this life February 13, 1993 at Ransom Nursing Home.  She lived 99 years, five months and 15 days.  Maude was baptized into the family of God at an early age and remained a faithful member of Ransom church of Christ.

      She was united in marriage to Joseph “Bud” Green of Brownell at Cherokee, Ok. June 19, 1912.  Four sons and four daughters were born to this union.  Except for a short time when they lived in Mountain View, Mo. and North Bend, Ne. where they owned and operated a shoe shop, most of her life was spent in Kansas, where she was a devoted mother, grandmother and friend to a host of neighbors.

      This mother is gone in body, but her spirit will ever dwell and abide in those she loved and reared.  Surviving her are two sons:  Clyde of Monteca, Ca. and Donald of Memphis, Tn.; three daughters:  Pauline Wilson, Broomfield, Co.; Virginia Marroney, San Leandro, Ca. and Delores Sloat, Ripon, Ca.; sons and daughters-in-law:  Lloyd Ummel, Anthony Marroney, Ann Green and Reba Green; 19 grandchildren; 37 great-grandchildren; several great-great-grandchildren; and many relatives and friends.

      Preceding her in death were her husband; daughter, Mildred Green Ummel and two sons, Orville, and son George Clayton, who died in infancy.

      Funeral services were held at the Ransom church of Christ Thursday, February 18.  The service was conducted by her son, Missionary Donald Green.  She was laid to rest in the Ransom Cemetery with Fitzgerald’s Funeral Home officiating.

Ness Co. News, Mar. 4, 1993


ORVILLE GREEN

 

      Orville Victor Green, 67, died Friday, July 13, 1990 at Humana Hospital in Dodge City.

      He was born Nov. 18, 1922, in Ness County, the son of Joseph and Maude Likes Green.  A retired custodian, he was a resident of Fort Dodge since 1977.  He was a member of the Ransom church of Christ.

      He is survived by his mother, Maude Green of Ransom; two brothers, Clyde of Ripon, Calif.; and Donald of the Republic of Singapore; and three sisters, Pauline Wilson of Denver, Colo.; Virginia Morroney of San Leandro, Calif.; and Delores Sloat of Ripon, Calif.

      The funeral was Monday morning, July 16, at the Ransom church of Christ with Mr. Ralph Bryant presiding.  Burial was in the Ransom Cemetery.

 

Ness Co. News, July 19, 1990

 


EUNICE GREENE

 

     Eunice Stanley Greene, 75, died Sept. 11, 1986, at the WaKeeney Long Term Care Center, WaKeeney.  Born Eunice Easley Dec. 3, 1910, at Garfield, Ark., she married V.B. Stanley.  He died in April, 1956.  She then married C.E. Greene in November of 1957.  She was a resident of WaKeeney for 2 1/2 years.

      She was a member of the church of Christ.

      Survivors:  husband, Albuquerque, N.M.; son, Bob Stanley, DeRidder, La.; brother, Clare Easley, Rogers, Ark.; sister, Wanda Sannella, San Diego, Calif.; and three grandchildren.

      Graveside service will be at 12:30 p.m. Friday at the Ransom Cemetery, Charles Wharton officiating.  Fitzgerald Funeral Home, Ness City, is in charge of arrangements.

(unknown newspaper source)

 

      Eunice Stanley Greene, 75, died Sept. 11, 1986 at WaKeeney Long Term Care Center.

      Born Dec. 3, 1910 at Garfield, Ark. to Clarence and Grace Murphy Easley, Eunice married V.B. Stanley, who died in April of 1956.  In November of 1957 she married C.E. Greene.  The Greenes made their home in Albuquerque, N.M.

      A member of the church of Christ, Eunice had spent her last few years at the Ransom and WaKeeney Long Term Care Units.  She was preceded in death by her parents, Mr. Stanley, and a sister, Vera McDaniel of Ransom.

      Survivors include the husband of Albuquerque; son Bob Stanley of De Ridder, La.; brother Clare Easley of Rogers, Ark.; sister Wanda Sannella of San Diego, Ca.; and three grandchildren.  She was the aunt of Dorothy Horchem of Ransom.

      A memorial graveside service was Sept. 12 at Ransom Cemetery, with Pastor Charles Wharton of the Ransom church of Christ.

 

Ness Co. News, Sept. 18, 1986

 

 

 

 


ANNA GRIFFITH

 

     Anna Griffith, 72, a Ransom resident since 1971, died Saturday, Feb. 29, 1992, at St. Francis Medical Center in Wichita.

      Born Oct. 29, 1919, at Timken, she married Lyle Sweasy Jan. 29, 1939, at Caldwell.  He died July 10, 1965.  She married J.L. Griffith May 10, 1968.  He died March 3, 1976.

      She was a member of Immanuel Lutheran Church of Wichita, the Veterans of Foreign Wars of Ransom and the Eagles Lodge of WaKeeney.

      She is survived by a son, Larry Sweasy of Potwin; two daughters, Brenda Soles of Wichita and Vicky Auman of Hays; three brothers, Louis Andrasek of Garden City, Bohuslav Andrasek of Fort Collins, Colo. and Joseph Andrasek of Great Bend; three sisters, Mildred Peters, Fort Collins, Colo., Rosie Hill of Sharon Springs and Marie Cofer of Ransom; six grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren.

      The funeral was Tuesday afternoon at the Fitzgerald Funeral Home in Ness City with the Rev. Marjorie Ediger, pastor of the Ransom Mennonite Church, presiding.  Burial was in the Ransom Cemetery.

 

Ness Co. News, Mar. 6, 1992

 

 


CASSIE GRISELL

 

      Mrs. Cassie Grisell, 89, passed away Wednesday evening, December 22, at the Ransom Hospital, after failing health for the past year.

      Born in Saline County, Nebr., on October 15, 1876, she had lived in Ransom in the 1920’s, but had lived since then in Bartley, Nebr., Emporia and Centralia, before moving to the nursing home in Ransom last year.

      She was married to Simeon R. Grisell on March 23, 1894, in Nebraska.

      Survivors are:  Four daughters, Mrs. Alma See of Ransom, Mrs. Geneva Shank of Indianola, Nebr., Mrs. Nelle Lee of Emporia, and Mrs. Shirley Madden of Topeka; three sons, Gary of Centralia, Albert of Emporia, and William of Ransom; 18 grandchildren, 42 great-grandchildren, other relatives and family friends.

      Funeral services were held from the Ransom Methodist Church Sunday afternoon, December 26, conducted by the pastor, Rev. Bruce Blake.  Interment was in the Ransom Cemetery.

 

Ness Co. News, Dec. 30, 1965

 

 

OBITUARY

 

      Cassie Ann Grisell, daughter of Nathaniel and Amey Moore, was born on October 15, 1876, in Saline County, Nebr., and passed away at the Grisell Memorial Hospital in Ransom Wednesday, December 22, bringing to a close almost 90 years of living with and for others.

      Her childhood years were spent in Saline County, Nebr., where she was joined in marriage to Simeon R. Grisell on March 22, 1894.

      Her early married years were spent in Frontier, Murness and Red Willow Counties in Nebraska, where she made a home for her seven children and husband.

      In the early 1920’s Mrs. Grisell accompanied her husband to Ransom where he had contracted to build a new drug store.  A short time later they again returned to Ransom to build the Grisell Memorial Hospital, and made Ransom their home.

      During these early years she was associated with the hospital as a nurse or cook, and spent her time serving the needs of others.  Mrs. Grisell always had a feeling of religious involvement and was very active in the activities of the First Christian Church.

            The Grisell’s moved to Emporia in 1941, where they made their home until the death of Mr. Grisell in 1957.  Following the death of her husband she made her home with a son, Guy, in Centralia until 1964, when she moved to the rest home in Ransom where she was close to her daughter and son, Mrs. Alma See and Bill Grisell.

      Mrs. Grisell is preceded in death by her husband and an infant daughter, Mabel Glee.

      She is survived by four daughters:  Mrs. Geneva Shank of Indianola, Nebr., Mrs. Nellie Lee of Emporia, Mrs. Alma See of Ransom, and Mrs. Shirley Madden of Topeka; and by three sons, Guy of Centralia, Albert of Emporia, and William of Ransom; also 18 grandchildren and 42 great-grandchildren.

 

Ness Co. News, Dec. 30, 1965

 

 


LONA GRISELL

 

OBITUARY

 

      Lona B. Marhofer was born April 1, 1881, in a log house near Goshen, Ind., the only daughter of Frederick and Ada Marhofer, and died March 26, 1952 in Tempe, Ariz.  In her early childhood her parents moved to Windom, Kansas, and a few years later to the Ransom community where she grew to womanhood and became a teacher.  Throughout her life, her interests have centered in the Ransom community.

      In 1903, she was married to Dr. W.S. Grisell of Ransom.  She became a registered pharmacist and spent the major portion of her life in the drug business.  From 1929 to 1945, she lived in Johnson, Kansas, where she owned and operated a drug store.  She was a charter member of the Eastern Star at Johnson.

      Her church was one of the supreme interests of her life.  She joined the Methodist Church as a young woman, and was an active member, especially using her talent as a singer in her church work.

      Outstanding among her characteristics were her selflessness and her loyalty to any cause in which she believed.  Her own comfort and welfare were never of first importance to her, but her main concern and interests were centered in her brothers and their families.  She fitted admirably in the role of elder sister, always ready with a helping hand or word of encouragement.  She never wavered in her support of a cause she believed to be right.

      Lona was preceded in death by her parents and two brothers, Frederick Albert and Vernon J., and is survived by her brothers, Orris W., Ray N., and Olin J., and their families, and the family of her brother, Vernon.

      Services were held from the Ransom Methodist Church with Rev. V.L. Chapman and Rev. Snyder in charge.  Burial was in the Ransom Cemetery.

 

Ness Co. News, Apr. 3, 1952

 

 


SIMEON GRISELL

 

      Simeon R. Grisell, 87, of Emporia, father of Mrs. H.S. See of Ransom, and a former Ransom resident, passed away at a Topeka hospital on Wednesday, October 23, following an extended illness.

      Mr. Grisell constructed several buildings in Ransom in the 1920’s, including the Ransom drug store building, and the hospital building for the late Dr. W.S. Grisell, who later gave the building to the city.

      Survivors, besides the daughter at Ransom, include:  The widow, Ms. Cassie Grisell; three sons, Guy Grisell of Centralia, Albert Grisell of Emporia, and William Grisell of Oakland, Calif.; three daughters, Mrs. Geneva DeMere of Indianola, Nebr., Mrs. Nelle Lee and Mrs. Shirley Madden of Emporia; a brother, 18 grandchildren, 26 great-grandchildren and other relatives and friends.

      Services were conducted at Emporia Saturday morning, October 26, and interment was made in the Ransom Cemetery.

 

Ness Co. News, Oct. 31, 1957

 

 

OBITUARY

 

      Simeon Roswell Grisell was born June 26, 1870, in Jerusalem, Ohio, the son of Simeon and Pheobe Grisell and departed this life October 23, 1957, at the age of 87 years and 4 months at a hospital in Topeka.

      He was united in marriage March 22, 1894, to Cassie A. Moore in Furnas County, Nebr.  To this union were born three sons and five daughters.

      Many of their married years were spent at Bartley, Nebr.  In 1920 he moved to Ransom to build the drug store and various other buildings.  They returned to Nebraska in 1922 but returned to Ransom in 1926 to build the hospital which his brother, Dr. W.S. Grisell, later left to the city.

      In 1941 they moved to Emporia where he made his home until he entered the hospital in 1956.

      Ross, as he was called by his friends, became a member of the First Christian Church when quite young and attended that church as long as he was able.

      He was preceded in death by his parents, five brothers, John, Hubert, Lon, Chal and William; two sisters, Lizzie and Alma; and one daughter, Mable Glee, who died in infancy.

      He is survived by his wife, Cassie; three sons, Guy of Centralia, Albert of Emporia, and William of Oakland, Calif.; four daughters, Mrs. Geneva DeMere of Indianola, Nebr., Mrs. Nelle Lee and Mrs. Shirley Madden of Emporia and Mrs. Alma See of Ransom; one brother, Linley of Des Moines, Iowa; 18 grandchildren, 26 great-grandchildren and a host of other relatives and friends.

      Funeral services were conducted at Emporia Saturday morning, October 26, and interment was in the Ransom Cemetery, services by Rev. Raymond Keller.

Ness Co. News, Nov. 7, 1957

 

 

 

WILLIAM GRISELL

 

     William C. Grisell, 59, long time Ransom resident passed away at his home at Ransom on Thursday morning, February 27.

      He was born on November 1, 1909, at Bartley, Nebr., and operated the See Oil Company at Ransom.

      Funeral services were held at WaKeeney on Saturday afternoon, March 1, conducted by Rev. William McFall, pastor of the Ransom Untied Methodist Church.  Interment was in the Ransom Cemetery.

      Survivors include:  Two daughters, Mrs. Jack Creacy of Dublin, Calif., and Mrs. George Sonnier of Oakland, Calif.; four sisters, Mrs. Alma See of Ransom, Mrs. Geneve Shank of Indianola, Nebr., Mrs. Nelle Lee of Emporia, and Mrs. Shirley Madden of Topeka; two brothers, Guy Grisell of Baileyville, and Albert Grisell of Emporia; other relatives and friends.

 

Ness Co. News, Mar. 6, 1969

 

 

OBITUARY

 

      William (Bill) Grisell, son of Simeon R. and Cassie A. Grisell, was born November 1, 1909, at Bartley, Nebr., and passed away at his home at Ransom, Kansas February 27, 1969.

      His early childhood was spent at Bartley, Nebr.  The family later moved to Ransom where he was a graduate of Ransom High School.

      His early adult years were spent in Oakland, Calif.  In early 1959 he returned to Ransom where he made his home with Mr. and Mrs. H.S. See.  For the past seven years he had worked at the See Oil Company, living in a trailer home near his work the past 1 1/2 years.

      Bill was a handy man at all kinds of work and a friend to all who knew him.  He especially loved small children and animals.

      He leaves to mourn his passing, two daughters:  Mrs. J.F. (Joyce) Creasy of Dublin, Cal., and Mrs. G.V. (Barbara) Sonnier of Oakland, Cal.; two brothers, Guy of Baileyville, and Albert of Emporia; four sisters, Mrs. Charles (Geneva) Shank of Indianola, Nebr., and Mrs. G.H. (Nelle) Lee of Emporia, Mrs. Alma See of Ransom, and Mrs. Lee (Shirley) Madden of Topeka; three grandchildren, Michael Watkins, Jennifer and Sandra Creasy of Dublin, Calif.; a large number of other relatives and a host of friends.

      Funeral services were held Saturday, March 1, and he was laid to rest beside his father and mother in the Ransom Cemetery.

 

 

Ness Co. News, Mar. 20, 1969

 

WILLIAM GRISELL

 

     Word was received at Ransom this Wednesday of the death of Dr. W.S. Grisell that morning at his home in Bartley, Nebr., where he had resided in recent years since his retirement from the practice of medicine.

      Dr. Grisell was a most highly respected citizen of Ransom and Ness County.  He had established the Grisell Memorial Hospital and presented much of the property of that institution to the people of Ransom.  He had also presented the site of the Ransom City Park, which also bears his name.

      Funeral services for Dr. Grisell will be held this Friday at Ransom but the hour of the services could not be learned in time to publish.

 

Ness Co. News, Apr. 14, 1938

 

OBITUARY

 

      William Seward Grisell, son of Simeon and Phoebe Grisell, was born January 31, 1873, at Jerusalem, Monroe County, Ohio, and passed away at the home of his brother, Ross, in Bartley, Nebraska, at the age of 65 years, 2 months, 13 days.

      He had been in failing health for seven years, and bedfast for more than two years, but was stricken with his fatal illness, pneumonia, just a few hours before his death.

     Dr. Grisell came to Ransom, Kansas, in 1899, direct from Kansas City Medical College, and began his medical practice which continued through 33 years.  During all those years he was true to his mission and ministered to those who called him, no matter how far he must drive, or how bitter the weather.  Although his medical practice was large and demanding, he was always seeking to improve, and took additional courses in medicine in both Chicago and New York.

      He was married September 4, 1903, to Miss Lona B. Marhofer.  He was a dynamic personality, eager for progress and accomplishment.  He was a fearlessly honest and upright man, and on every occasion stood firmly by his principles.  He had the highest ambitions for the community.  His membership is in the Methodist Church of Ransom.  He served the community well in his capacity as a good citizen, having been a member of the school board for many years, and chairman when the first high school building was built.  He served as Mayor of Ransom for two terms.  During this period the electric line was brought into Ransom and the town contracted for its first electric power.  While Dr. Grisell was mayor he completed arrangements whereby a tract of land was set aside for a city park and the first few trees were planted.  This park now stands a beautiful tribute to the vision he cherished.

      In 1928 another of his cherished dreams was realized when he built and opened the Mid-West Hospital in Ransom.   When failing health made it impossible for him to supervise this project longer, he expressed a desire to give it to the Ransom community.  Two years ago this was done, and the board of directors changed the name to Grisell Memorial Hospital that it might be a symbol of the admiration and respect this community has for Dr. Grisell.

      Although these various projects are tangible evidence of the worthy accomplishments of Dr. Grisell, those older friends who have stood with him through the years, and those hundreds of men and women who were ushered into the world with his assistance will testify that Dr. Grisell’s strength of character, his unyielding fight against wrong, and his persistent pursuit of the right, are the greatest contribution he has made to this community and its citizens.  Dr. Grisell was a member of the Masonic Lodge and proud of this affiliation.

      During the World War he enlisted and served in the Medical Corps of the United States Army.

      For the past 4 1/2 years the doctor made his home in Bartley, Nebraska, with his brother, Ross, and wife.  These two gave their entire time and attention to the tender care of the doctor who bore his long illness patiently and without complaint.  Besides this faithful brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. S.R. Grisell, of Bartley, Nebraska, he leaves his twin brother, Linley S. Grisell, and his wife of Des Moines, Iowa; a half sister, Alma Carle of Topeka, Kansas; a sister-in-law, Mrs. Minnie Grisell, of La Moille, Illinois, a large number of nieces and nephews, and a host of friends.

      Many will remember the motto which hung on the wall of Dr. Grisell’s office, “Let me live in the house by the side of the road and be a friend to man.”  This was a poem the doctor loved, and a part of his creed for daily living.

 

 

        “I see from my house by the side of the road

By the side of the highway of life,

The men who press with the ardor of hope,

The men who faint with the strife.

But I turn now away from their smiles and their tears

Both parts of an infinite plan-

Let me live in a house by the side of the road

And be a friend to man.

Let me live in my house by the side of the road

Where the race of men go by-

They are good, they are bad, they are weak, they are strong

Wise, foolish-so am I.

Then why should I sit in the scorner’s seat

Or hurl the cynic’s ban?

Let me live in my house by the side of the road

And be a friend to man.”

 

      The following lines were written by the doctor’s twin brother, Linley Grisell, a short time before the doctor passed on.

 

The End of Life

        “When the sun of life in the west shall sink

And I see the evening star;

When the road that leads to the river’s brink

Shall end at the harbor bar;

When I see the boatman with lifted oar

As he waits at the bar for me,

To row me across to the unknown shore

The brink of eternity;

 

When I shall cross, I would leave behind

Not estates of gold or fame,

But only a life that is true and kind

And a pure and spotless name.

And I think I will rest more peaceful then

If it can be truly said,

“He was kind, and he loved his fellow men,

And he earned his daily bread.”

 

It will be a morsel of comfort sweet

To know I have done my best

To help smooth the road for other men’s feet

And comfort some troubled breast.

And when my spirit is wending its way

Across the fathomless sea,

If only someone by my bier can say,

“That man was a friend to me.”

 

And when I am laid on that western hill

By the friends I leave behind,

I long to live in their memory still,

Because I was true and kind.

And I think I shall rest more peaceful there

If I know that it can be said,

“He loved his fellow men everywhere,

And he earned his daily bread.”

 

      Funeral rites for the late Dr. Grisell were held in the Methodist Church of Ransom on Friday afternoon, April 15.  Rev. L.R. Fish, pastor, read the scripture and offered prayer.  Brother Howard Halverson, Christian minister of Bartley, Nebraska, read the obituary and brought a comforting message to those who packed the church to over flowing.  Dr. H.C. Embry of Great Bend delivered a very fitting eulogy.  The choir was composed of J.L. Dieffenbach, Mrs. Dorothea Barry, Mrs. Agnes Hays, Wilbur Brock, H.C. Anderson, Mrs. Ethel McNinch, Miss Gladys Garrelts and Chas. J. Shellenberger.   They sang the favorite songs of the doctor; “When My Life’s Work is Ended.” “Jesus Is Mine,” and “I Know That My Redeemer Livith.”  Wilbur Brock sang as a solo, “Face to Face”.  Miss Lila McNinch was pianist.  Pall bearers were:  C.E. Scherzinger, Chas. H. Miller, L.C. Miller, Warren A. Willour, Chas. Stutzman and Will Gill.

      The following members of the Masonic Lodge, from Ness City, occupied seats of honor at the services:  Chas. Beardslee, A.W. Wilson, O.L. Lennen, Hays Floyd, Vyrl Levan and Harold Hunt.

      Funeral director John A. Aeby had charge of the body which was laid to rest in the Ransom Cemetery.

 

Ness Co. News, Apr. 21, 1938

 

 

 


CURTIS GUIPRE

 

      Mr. and Mrs. L.B. Dubbs received word Friday, December 14, that their grandson, Curtis Rex Guipre, was killed in an accidental landing of an airplane at Port Arthur, Texas.  Rex was riding with a friend, Fred White, who was the owner of the plane, and who also died from injuries received.

      Rex was on a 30 day furlough after graduating from the cryptography school at Scott Field, Ill.  He was known here, having spent most of his life here, and had been here visiting his grandparents, other relatives and friends.

      The funeral services were held at Ransom on Wednesday, December 19.

 

Ness Co. News, Dec. 20, 1945

 

OBITUARY

 

      Curtis Rex Guipre was born in Topeka, Kansas, January 12, 1927, the son of Rex and Bertha Guipre, and lost his life as the result of a tragic airplane accident which also took the life of his chum, Fred White, in Port Arthur, Texas, on December 14, 1945, less than a month before his nineteenth birthday.

      When Rex was a baby, his father’s business took the family to Dodge City, where they resided until a fatal automobile accident took the father’s life in August of 1931.  During the remaining years of his life, Rex, with his mother, spent much of the time with his grandparents in Ransom and with his aunt, Netta Curry.

      His high school days were in Port Arthur, Texas, where he was graduated in 1944.  His interest in flying developed while he was in school prompting him to take flying lessons and to enlist in the Air Corps Reserve.  After graduation he successfully passed the tests required for the Army Specialized Training Reserve program and was enrolled at New Mexico A & M College.  Later he enrolled at Lamar College at Beaumont, Texas, where he was a student until he was inducted for training at Sheppard Field, Texas.

      From Sheppard Field, Rex was one of seven men selected for a special training in cryptography and finished this training at Scott Field in Illinois November 27, 1945.  Upon enlisting in the regular army, Rex was given a 30 day furlough until orders to report at Kearns, Utah, on December 27, for further training in preparation for overseas service.  During his furlough Rex had visited relatives at Ransom, Simpson, and Kansas City, and friends at Port Arthur before the accident which caused his untimely death.

      Always interested in books, he spent hours in the library and from early childhood attempted to express his thoughts in writing.  He wrote some very creditable verse and had expressed his desire to continue and complete his education.

      Curtis Rex was endowed with at least two qualities which made life worth living and interesting for him.  He had a most active and receptive mind, he loved to read and learn.  Older friends often remarked at his ability to discuss a wide variety of topics intelligently, and at his evident enjoyment in talking with older people.  He had a spontaneous interest in other people, a winning personality, which made friends of all he met.  He endeared himself to old and young in every community in which he lived.

      Rex was reared in a Christian home and was a member of the Methodist Temple in Port Arthur.  The memories he leaves to his family and friends are pleasant ones.

      Surviving are his mother, Mrs. Bertha Guipre of Port Arthur, Texas; his sister and brother, Frances Jean and Lyle LaFon, and his baby nephew, Gregory Lyle LaFon, of Des Moines, Iowa; his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. L.B. Dubbs of Ransom, and Fred Guipre of Simpson; his aunts, uncles and cousins, Mrs. Netta Curry, Jack and Joe Curry of Ransom; Mr. and Mrs. Chas. E. Dubbs of Kansas City, Mo.; Mr. and Mrs. Loren McClintock and Diane of Simpson; Mr. and Mrs. George Nelson and three sons of Parson; Chas. F. Dubbs of Ransom, other relatives and many friends.

      “He has achieved success who has lived well, laughed often and loved much; who has gained the respect of intelligent men and the love of little children; who has filled his niche and accomplished his tasks; who has left the world better than he found it; who has always looked for the best in others and given the best he had; whose life has been an inspiration, whose memory a benediction.”

      Corporal Radmer of Lake Charles, La., brought the remains to Ransom where the funeral was in charge of J.A. Aeby at the Methodist Church, Wednesday afternoon.  Pall bearers were men in uniform, Lieut. E.J. Shellenberger, Lieut. (j.g.) Wilbur Brock, Lieut. Robert Bentley, Lieut. Walter Doerschlag, S/Sgt. Reginald Buxton, and Corp. Vernon Marhofer.

      Rev. S.E. Paulding preached a fitting sermon on the subject, “Life’s Detours”.  The singing was by the high school chorus with a solo, “Sunrise Tomorrow” by Miss Rosanne Willour.  The beautiful floral tributes from Port Arthur friends added to the profusion of flowers.  The impressive military service at the graveside was in charge of soldiers from the Great Bend Army Air Base.  Interment was in Ransom Cemetery.

 

Ness Co. News, Dec. 27, 1945

 

 

 

 

 


ELBA GULLETT

 

      The body of Elba Gullet, who died in northern Montana, was brought here for burial.

      Elba Gullett was born in Logan County, Ohio, August 17, 1883, and came to Trego County, Kansas, in 1885, where he resided with his parents on Sand Creek, five miles north of town, until about three years ago, when he and his father moved to Canada.  He was working in Montana at the time of his death, which was caused by a piece of machinery striking him on the head, near the temple.  The body arrived here Saturday night and funeral services were held in the Methodist Church, of which he was a member, conducted by Rev. Gilmore, and the remains interred in the Ransom Cemetery, Sunday afternoon, September 26, 1915.

      Elba was well known in this vicinity having lived here many years and was loved by all who knew him.  He died at the age of thirty-two years, one month and three days.

      He leaves a father, two brothers and three sisters, besides other relatives to mourn him.

 

Ness Co. News, Oct. 2, 1915

 

 

 

 

      Word was received here last week that Elba Gullett formerly of this place but who was working in Montana had been accidentally killed by a piece of machinery.  The body was shipped here for burial arriving Sunday morning and funeral services were held at the M.E. Church at 2:30 p.m. conducted by Rev. Gilmore.

 

Ness Co. Echo, Oct. 2, 1915

 

 

 

      Elba Joseph Gullett was born in Ohio, August 17, 1883 and died September 20, 1915.  He leaves a father, two brothers and three sisters; two sisters, Mrs. Eugene Holmes and Mrs. Will Haug residing here and the father and one brother and sister living in Canada.

 

Ness Co. Echo, Oct. 2, 1915

 

      Drawn beneath the wheels of a farm wagon which was being pulled along at a rapid rate by a team of runaway horses, Elwin Gillette, [Elba Gullett], ranch hand, was almost instantly killed yesterday noon upon the ranch of L.L. Jones, about 15 miles southwest of this city on the river road.

      Gillette was in the employ of William Roberts of this city who had taken a contract for putting up hay on the Jones’ ranch.  He had started to work for Roberts last Thursday and was considered a very good workman.  It was just as the men in the field were loading the last wagon with hay before going to lunch that the team attached to this wagon started to run.  Gillette, who was upon the ground, grasped the lines and was running along trying to pull the horses down when, by the speed they were traveling, he was drawn against the wagon just between the front and rear wheels and was thrown or fell to the ground so the rear wheel passed over the back of his head, crushing the skull.  Upon the spot where he fell he died within a few minutes.

      Word of the accident was telephoned to this city and Coroner W.D. Madden, Undersheriff M.D. Nicholson and Undertaker W.H. George went out to the place by automobile, they bringing the body back to the W.H. George Company undertaking establishment late yesterday afternoon.

      Gillette was about 30 years of age and is thought to be a resident of Canada.  He had worked for about a month upon the John Hughes farm about six miles below this city on the opposite side of the river from the Jones’ place and had crossed over last week to take employment on the latter place.  His trunk was left at the Hughes farm so the authorities had not been enabled to investigate its contents last evening.

      He had some good clothing at the Jones’ ranch and a small amount of money.  A note book found in one of his pockets showed that he had been making deposits in some bank but a portion of the entries in the book were in short hand, including the name of the bank.  It is evident from the entries in the book that Gillette has at some time been a stenographer.  The book in question is a souvenir, or advertising novelty and bears the stamp “Compliments of Char. Boyer, tailor, Wetaskiwin, Alberta.”

      The body will be held until the authorities can get into communication with relatives or friends, if any can be located.


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