Ness County, Kansas

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The following obituaries are of the deceased buried in Ransom Cemetery, St. Aloysius Catholic Cemetery, and Cyrus Cemetery, Ransom, Ness County, Kansas. These obituaries and news articles were collected and contributed by Mark Horchem.
MARY DOTY

Mrs. Mary B. Doty, 78, long time Ransom community resident, passed away at a Hays hospital early Saturday, April 6, 1963, where she had been a patient for almost a month.
She was born February 25, 1885, at Bronson, and married Harry P. Doty on April 12, 1903, at La Harpe. Mr. Doty passed away February 14, 1961.
Funeral services were held from the Ransom Methodist Church, of which she was a member, Tuesday afternoon, April 9, conducted by the pastor, Rev. Bruce Blake. Interment was in the Ransom Cemetery, with Fitzgerald’s in charge.
Survivors include four daughters, Mrs. Helen Clouston of Ness City, and Mrs. Amy Ummel, Mrs. Raymond Schweitzer, and Mrs. Vincent Schreiber, all of Ransom; three sons, Kenneth Doty of Ransom, Edwin Doty of Pocatello, Idaho, and Shelby Doty of Jefferson City, Mo.; 15 grandchildren, 13 great-grandchildren, other relatives and many friends.

Ness Co. News, Apr. 11, 1963
 

OBITUARY

Mary Belle, youngest daughter of John and Sarah Moules, was born on February 25, 1885, on a farm near Bronson in Bourbon County, Kansas. She departed this life at Hadley Hospital in Hays, Kansas, on April 6, 1963.
When a young child she moved with her family to Moran in Allen County. There was spent her girlhood and young womanhood. It was there that she became a member of the Moran Methodist Church. She attended the Moran grade and high school. She then taught one term of school.
The following spring she was married to Harry P. Doty on April 12, 1903 at LaHarpe, Kansas. The couple lived in Moran during the early years of their marriage and there was born the first two of the 10 children born to this union. These two children died in early infancy as well as another baby son born later. Seven children survive her.
She and her husband then moved to Denver, Colo. After a year’s stay they returned to Allen County and made their home in LaHarpe. They moved to the Ransom community in 1914. For nearly 50 years Mrs. Doty resided in the Ransom community.
For most of the last 14 years of her life Mrs. Doty was confined to a wheelchair. A paralytic stroke deprived her of the use of her right leg but she was very happy that she was able to regain the use of her voice and partial use of her right hand so that she was able to continue with her needle work. She was an expert with the needle and the crochet hook and was seldom seen without a piece of work in her lap. She and Mr. Doty entered the Ransom Nursing Home on May 20, 1959. Mr. Doty passed away on February 14, 1961.
Her last Christmas in the Home was a very happy one for her because she was so proud of having contributed to so much to the success of the first Christmas bazaar held by the ladies of the Nursing Home. She was so happy when she was asked to help pick out the porch furniture for which the bazaar money was used.
Mrs. Doty was a faithful wife and a devoted mother, who gave her whole life to her home and to her children. She will be greatly missed by her sons: Edwin, Shelby and Kenneth;and by her daughters: Helen Clouston, Rosalie Schweitzer, Reita Schreiber and Amy Ummel; her sons-in-law; Vincent Schreiber and Raymond Schweitzer; and her daughter-in-law Gloria Doty; also by her 15 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren whom she dearly loved.
Funeral services were held on April 9 from the Ransom Methodist Church, conducted by Rev. Bruce Blake. Interment was in the Ransom Cemetery with Fitzgerald’s in charge.

Ness Co. News, Apr. 25, 1963
 

ALBERT DUBBS

Ransom, 8;00 p.m., April 6th -- A.M. Dubbs, pioneer settler and member of G.A.R. is dead. Funeral will be held Friday.

Ransom Record, April 7, 1927

FUNERAL SERVICES

The funeral service was held at the M.E. church on Friday, April 8, at 10:30 a.m. Rev. J.L. Mitchell had the service in charge and Rev. Bisbee of Arnold preached a very fine sermon. A large company was in attendance and the casket was covered with flowers. All living relatives were present. Interment was made in the Ransom Cemetery.

----------------------
Albert M. Dubbs was born at Burnt Cabins, Pennsylvania on February 24th, 1846, and departed this life at his home near Ransom, Ness County, Kansas, at the ripe age of 81 years, 1 month and 12 days.
In the year 1870 he was married to Miss Elizabeth Aller at Chambersburg, Pennsylvania.
Their home was in Fulton County, Pennsylvania, until the year 1879 in February, when, with his father and brother, he came “out west”, to Ness County, Kansas, and homesteaded some government land. That fall his wife and two boys, Burd and Charlie, joined him, and the home which has endured for 48 years, was established, ---- a pleasant home where love and good will reigned and none, of whatever race or creed, was ever turned away.
When quite young, Mr. Dubbs served his country for about two years, in the Civil War.
The old pioneer will be missed by all who knew him as neighbor, host, or friend; by his three sisters, Mrs. Lillie Traver of Ransom, Kans.; Mrs. Minnie Kelly of Kansas City, Mo.; and Mrs. Louise Kelly of Decorum, Pennsylvania; by his two brothers, William O., and Samuel E. Dubbs of Ransom, Kans.; by his wife, faithful companion for 57 years; two sons, Charles F. and Lewis Burdette of Ransom, Kans.; three grandchildren, Charles E. Dubbs of Kansas City, Mo.; Mrs. Torrence Curry of Oklahoma City, Okla.; and Mrs. Rex Guipre of North Platte, Neb.; and two great grandchildren, Francis Jean and Curtis Rex Guipre.
It is an unusual thing for a man of his age to have five living brothers and sisters, and all were present at his funeral.
This quiet, kindly man exemplified, during his long life, ---Galatians 5:22 --- “But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, long-suffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness, temperance; against such there is no law”.
One of our poets, James Whitcomb Riley, thus describes “A Good Man”

A good man never dies --
In worthy deed and prayer
And helpful hands and honest eyes,
If smiles or tears be there;
Who lives for you and me --
Lives for the world he tries
To help -- he lives eternally,
A good man never dies.

Who likes to bravely take
His share of toil and stress,
And, for his weaker fellow’s sake,
Makes every burden less --
He may, at last seem worn--
Lie fallen -- hands and eyes
Folded -- yet, though we mourn and mourn,
A good man never dies.

Funeral services were held at the Methodist Church in Ransom, Rev. Bisbee, Methodist pastor at Arnold, preaching the sermon and Rev. Mitchell, of Ransom, assisting in the services. Rev. Mitchell conducted the services at the grave in the Ransom Cemetery. A large crowd attended, as the Dubbs family is well known throughout the county.
 
 

CELIA DUBBS

Celia Dubbs, daughter of L.B. and Mary Maxwell, was born February 23, 1871, in Missouri, and passed away at Crowley, Colo., October 30, 1955.
At the age of one year, the family moved to Wilson County, Kansas, and when she was 16 they came to Ness County.
She attended church services at little Cyrus school where she later confessed her faith in Christ and was baptized. It was in this same church that she was united in marriage to Samuel E. Dubbs on October 28, 1888. They established their home in southern Trego County where Mr. Dubbs had taken a homestead and built a sod house.
To this union were born three children, Maurice E. of Ransom, Alice Gravatt of Selma, Calif., and Mabel Adkinson of Crowley, Colo. This was a typical pioneer family who endured all the hardships of the early day settlers. In 1900, they bought a farm west of Ransom where they resided until 1925 when they retired to their home in Ransom.
Mr. Dubbs preceded her in death on April 13, 1945, shortly after celebrating their 56th wedding anniversary. Her entire life was centered in her home, her family, and any religious or worthwhile activity of her community. Due to illness, she had made her home for the last six years with her daughter and husband, Mabel and Omer Adkinson of Crowley, Colo. Although bedfast for the last two years, patience and cheerfulness reflected the faith she maintained in her Savior and her life was a benediction to those whose privilege it was to care for her during her illness.
She leaves to mourn her loss, her three children, eight grandchildren, 12 great-grandchildren, and a host of other relatives and friends.
Funeral services were held from the Ransom Methodist Church, Wednesday afternoon, November 2, conducted by Rev. Paul McDowell of Crowley, Colo. Music was furnished by Mrs. Louis Horchem, organist, and a mixed quartette composed of Mrs. Reginald Buxton, Mrs. Willard Horchem, Charles Shellenberger and Jess Dieffenbach, who sang “My Jesus I Love Thee”, “God Will Take Care of You” and “In The Sweet By and By.” Bearers were Lyman Conard, John Petty, Orville Horchem, Clarence Horchem, Charles Miller and John G. Mishler. Interment was in the Ransom Cemetery, John Aeby in charge.

Ness Co. News, Sept. 10, 1955
 

CHARLES DUBBS

Chas. F. Dubbs, 94, widely known and highly respected Ransom community man, passed away at the Ransom Hospital on Monday, December 30. He had been in failing health for some time.
Funeral services will be announced by Fitzgeralds later in the week.
He was born at Burnt Cabins, Penna., March 30, 1874, and came to the Ransom community with his parents and brother, the late L.B. Dubs, in 1879. He had since resided there.
He was a successful farmer over the years before retiring to the home in Ransom.
He was married to Bertha Funk on May 17, 1917, who passed away in December of that year.
Mr. Dubbs served four terms as sheriff of Ness County, first being elected in 1918, serving the 1919-23 four year limit, and then again serving from 1927 to 1931.
In 1934 Mr. Dubbs was elected county commissioner from the third district, and served in that capacity until retiring from active work in 1953.
The body will lie in state at the Fitzgerald Funeral Home here. The casket will not be opened at the funeral service.
Survivors include two nieces, Mrs. Netta Curry and Mrs. Bertha Whitaker, both of Ransom; and Chas. E. Dubbs of Kansas City, a nephew; other distant relatives and many, many friends.

Ness Co. News, Jan. 2, 1969
 
 

OBITUARY

Charles Franklin Dubbs was born March 30, 1874, at Burnt Cabins, Pa., the younger son of Albert M. Dubbs and Elizabeth Aller Dubbs. He passed away at the Grisell Memorial Hospital at Ransom, December 30, 1968.
When a boy of five, Charles with his parents and grandparents moved to the Ransom community where he had lived ever since. His first home with his parents and his elder brother Burd was in a sod house on his father’s homestead, three miles west of Ransom. He recorded the patent to his own homestead just north of his family home, on December 20, 1904. This patent was signed by Theodore Roosevelt. For the past 25 years he had lived with his brother, Burd, who preceded him in death by less than six months; and his two nieces, Mrs. Netta Curry and Mrs. Bertha Whitaker, who with their brother, Charles of Kansas City, survive him.
Charles with his brother, Burd, received his elementary education in the Centralia school which was organized through the efforts of his mother whom everyone called “Aunt Lib.” Later, he and Burd attended Central Normal college in Great Bend.
On May 18, 1917, he was united in marriage to Bertha Funk of Ransom, who died in December the same year.
Throughout his entire life, Charles’ two main interests were his community and his occupation as farmer and rancher. He was always deeply concerned about, and took an active part in the business and political activities of Ness County. He was a member of the board of directors, and for many years the president of the Arnold State Bank through it’s half-century of service. He was a director, and at one time, the president of the Farmers State Bank of Ransom. When The Farmers State Bank and the First State Bank of Ransom merged, he was elected a member of the new board.
In 1918 he was elected sheriff of Ness County, an office which he held for four terms. (1919-1923 and 1927-1931): In 1934 he was elected to the office of county commissioner from the third district and served in that office continuously until 1954.
Charles Dubbs was known to practically everyone in Ness County, and many persons sought his advice and counsel which was given more often than not in his short, terse, and witty manner. A little known side of his character was his habit of contributing generously to many of the community projects and benevolent enterprises. He leaves a heritage of his exemplary life for all to imitate. He constantly lived the pioneer way of hard work, frugality, the lending of a “helping hand” and a profound faith in the progress of his community.

Ness Co. News, Jan. 9, 1969
 

FLORENCE DUBBS

Mrs. W.O. Dubbs, an honored resident of Ransom since 1882, died at her home there this Monday night following a long illness. Mr. Dubbs preceded her in death several years ago.
Mrs. Dubbs is survived by six children, all of whom are especially well known. Mrs. G.G. Hays, state president of the Kansas W.C.T.U.; L.A. Dubbs, state representative and Democratic floor leader of the present legislature; Mrs. Lynn Stover, all of Ransom. Miss Minnie Dubbs, who returned in recent months from Detroit, Mich., to assist in the care of her mother; Wendell Dubbs of New York and Mrs. Margaret McMillan of Lamar, Colo. Another daughter, Rebecca Dubbs, preceded her mother in death.
Funeral services will be held this Thursday afternoon at 2:00 p.m. from the Ransom Methodist Church.

Ness Co. News, Dec. 15, 1938
 

OBITUARY

Florence Emily LaPlante was born May 13, 1868, in the village of Papineau, Illinois, and died at her home in Ransom, December 12, 1938, aged 70 years, 6 months, and 29 days.
She was baptized a member of the Presbyterian Church of St. Anne, Illinois, in early childhood and retained her membership in that church throughout her life. Her church home in Ransom was in the Christian Church where her presence was highly valued and she enjoyed a fine fellowship.
In 1881 her parents came to Ness County residing first at Schoharie and later moving to a farm northeast of Ransom. After completing the course of study in the pioneer schools she attended the Emporia State Normal for two years and returned to teach in the schools at Ness City and Ransom.
On June 28, 1892, she married William O. Dubbs and they established their home in Ransom where she has resided continuously since. Her husband and her daughter, Rebecca, and her brother, Isaac LaPlante, have preceded her to the unseen world. She is survived by six children, Albert Dubbs, Mrs. Agnes Hays, and Mrs. Myrtle Stover of Ransom, Minnie Dubbs of Detroit, Michigan, Mrs. Margaret McMillin of Lamar, Colo., and Wendell Dubbs of New York City, a sister, Mrs. Rena Parker of Long Beach, Calif., a brother, Lionel C. LaPlante of Chillicothe, Illinois, and six grandchildren.
Her life work was being a mother. In accomplishing this her influence extended far beyond the limits of her own family. Her home was always open and her energy never failing when good might be accomplished.
Many of our community’s ideals and institutions exist because she gave of herself freely in every cause of community betterment. She aided in organizing the first Sunday School in Ransom of which their present Methodist Sunday School is a successor. Through her efforts a Christian Endeavor society was organized. This society still carries on as the Mennonite Christian Endeavor. Her insistence that the children of the community must be permitted to secure advanced education at home resulted in the organization of Ransom High School.
Through all the years her greatest interest outside of her home has been the temperance movement. The Woman’s Christian Temperance Union was the organization which gave her the opportunity to forward her ideals and in it she worked incessantly.
Nor did her busy life keep her from the many deeds of personal helpfulness known only to those who were blessed by them. Her pleasing personality and alert intelligence won many friends for her. Her thoughtful kindness and unselfish generosity endeared her to all who knew her.
Rev. Henry Bondurant of Fort Lupton, Colo., gave the funeral sermon at the M.E. Church, Thursday afternoon, where a very large group of friends had gathered to pay their last respects. He eulogized the life of a Christian character and expressed the belief that Mrs. Dubbs’s noble influence would never cease.
More than forty members of the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union occupied a reserved section of the church and took part in the ritual conducted by Mrs. A.W. Wilson of Ness City and Mrs. Albert Brock of Ransom. A quartet: H.C. Anderson, Mrs. F.T. McNinch, Mrs. Ira Stutzman, and C.J. Shellenberger, sang. Miss Mary Stutzman sang “Lead Kindly Light” as a solo. They were accompanied by Miss Lila McNinch at the piano.
The entire front of the sanctuary was banked with beautiful flowers. Old friends and neighbors were pall bearers: E.A. Jesse, A.C. Tilley, Omer Douglas, Peter Horchem, H.F. Dieffenbach and C.J. Shellenberger.
Burial was made in the family plot in the Ransom Cemetery with her husband and daughter.

Ness Co. News, Dec. 22, 1938

HANNAH DUBBS

Dwight Mettlen was called to teach for Miss Dora Dubbs as her grandmother, Mrs. Howard Dubbs, who has been ill, is very low.

Ransom Record, Feb. 2, 1922
 

OBITUARY

Hannah Sabina Hommon was born in Franklin County, Penn. Oct. 14, 1842. Her parents removed to Illinois when she was quite young. On June 16, 1868, she was married to Howard J. Dubbs at Henderson, Illinois. One son, Ora Dubbs, was born to them.
In 1878 they came west to Iowa, then in 1879 on to Kansas, where they located near Ransom. In that pioneer home many a weary traveler realized the meaning of true hospitality. About seven years were spent in California, then they returned to Ransom, where the home has existed for twenty-five years.
January 18, 1898 Mrs. Dubbs was baptized and entered into fellowship with the church of Christ at Ransom, where she has since continued faithful although physically unable to attend services.
On Oct. 6, 1913 Howard Dubbs departed to the better land, and Aunt Sibbie, although a little lonely, but always brave and cheerful, kept the home fires burning, until at 8 p.m. Feb. 2, 1922, she departed this life at the ripe age of 79 years, 3 months and 18 days. She leaves to miss her, one son, Orra V., eight grandchildren, and two great grandsons; three sisters, Mrs. Mary Btuckburn, Dexter, Iowa, Mrs. Agnes Adams and Mrs. Catherine Owens, Santa Cruz, California, besides a host of friends in Ransom and vicinity.
Funeral services were held at the church of Christ at Ransom, Kas. Feb 4, 1922 at two o’clock. Rev. J.W. Vanderlip preached a helpful and comforting sermon and Bro. Briggs assisted in conducting the service. Burial was in the Ransom Cemetery beside her husband.

“O still, white face of perfect peace
Untouched by passion, freed from pain,
He who ordained that work should cease
Took to Himself the ripened grain.
Of human care you left no trace
No lightest trace of grief or pain.
On earth an empty form and face
In Heaven stands the ripened grain.”

Ransom Record, Feb. 9, 1922

HOWARD DUBBS

Howard John Dubbs was born June 24, 1844, at Burnt Cabins, Pennsylvania, and died October 16, 1913, at Ransom, having attained the age of 69 years, 3 months and 11 days.
On June 16, 1868, he was married to Hannah Sabina Hammond at Henderson, Illinois. To this union was born one child, Ora V. Dubbs, of Ransom.
He came to Ransom in the fall of 1879, and his home has been in or near Ransom ever since.
He obeyed the gospel November 19, 1898, under the preaching of D.W. Nay, of the church of Christ, and was a consistent member to the time of his death.
The funeral service was held at the church of Christ at 2 o’clock p.m., Tuesday, October 7, 1913, and was conducted by Rev. Laybourn, of the M.E. church, who spoke from the text, “Be not afraid: only believe,” and his words were full of consolation and promises to the relatives and friends of the deceased.
The floral offerings contributed by the school children and friends were beautiful.
Mr. Dubbs being an old and respected citizen of Ness County, a large concourse of friends gathered to pay their last respects to him.
The remains were laid to rest in the Ransom Cemetery.

Ness Co. News, Oct. 11, 1913

Howard John Dubbs was born June 24, 1844, at Burnt Cabins, Pennsylvania, and died October 6, 1913, at Ransom, Kansas, having attained the age of 69 years, 3 months and 11 days.
On June 16, 1868 he was married to Hannah Sabina Hammond at Henderson, Illinois. To this union was born one child, Ora V. Dubbs of Ransom.
In the fall of 1879, he came to Ransom and his home has been in or near there ever since.
He obeyed the gospel November 19, 1899, under the preaching of D.W. Nay of the church of Christ and was a consistent member to the time of his death.
The funeral service was held at the church of Christ at 2 o’clock Tuesday afternoon, October 7, 1913, and conducted by Rev. Laybourn of the Methodist Church, who spoke from the text: “Be not afraid: only believe” and his words were full of consolation and promise to the relatives and friends of the deceased.
The floral offerings contributed by the school children and friends were beautiful.
Mr. Dubbs being an old and highly respected citizen of Ness County, a large concourse of friends gathered to pay their last respects to him.
The remains were laid to rest in the Ransom Cemetery.

Ness Co. Echo, Oct. 11, 1913
 

LEWIS DUBBS

Lewis Albert Dubbs, 77, died Sunday morning, Nov. 29, 1970 at the Ransom Hospital.
Born April 15, 1893, in Ransom, he married Mary Vaile, June 20, 1921, in Hickman Mills, Mo. She died June 7, 1965. He then married Opal M. Wade, April 10, 1966, in Topeka. He was a lifetime resident here.
He was a member of the First Christian Church, Manhattan; Kansas Association of the Blind; Lyons Club International; Kansas Grain Dealers Association; Kansas Hospital Advisory Council; Lobbyists for the Blind; Kansas Citizens Council on Aging; Council for the Visually and Physically Handicapped; National Rehabilitation Association; Kansas Public Health Association; Braille Association of Kansas; and the Southwestern Kansas Association for the Visually Impaired. He attended the Mennonite Church, Ransom.
Survivors include the widow; daughters, Clara Louise Dubbs, Wichita; Mrs. Roy (Florence) Roat, San Jose, Calif.; brother, Wendell, Palo Alto, Calif.; sisters, Mrs. Myrtle Stover, Palo Alto, Calif.; Mrs. G.G. Hays, Wesley Towers, Hutchinson; Mrs. Raymond Millbrook, Topeka; two grandsons.
Funeral will be 1:00 p.m. Tuesday at the church; Rev. McFall, Rev. Garman Wedel, Bill Buggeln, Father Cornelius Leunissen. Burial will be in the Ransom Cemetery. Friends may call after 2 p.m. Monday and until services at the Fitzgerald Funeral Home.

Unknown newspaper source

L.A. Dubbs, 77, lifelong resident of the Ransom community, passed away at the home there early Sunday, November 29, 1970, of an apparent heart attack.
He was born at Ransom April 15, 1893, the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. W.O. Dubbs. He became well known over the county through his many activities in the educational, banking and grain dealing fields, and over the state through his activities with the visually handicapped organizations in later years, after losing his sight in midlife.
He was a member of the First Christian Church at Manhattan, and of the Ransom Lions Club, Kansas Grain Dealers Association, Kansas Citizens Council on Aging, Kansas Council for Library Services to Visually and Physically Handicapped, National Rehabilitation Association, Kansas Public Health Association,
Braille Association of Kansas, Kansas Hospital Advisory Council, Southwest Kansas Association for the Visually Impaired, and was a registered lobbyist for the Blind in Kansas.
He was united in marriage to Mary Vaile on June 20, 1921, at Hickman Mills, Mo. She passed away June 7, 1965.
He married Opal M. Wade April 10, 1966, in Topeka, who survives him.
Other survivors include two daughters, Mrs. Roy (Florence) Roat of San Jose, Calif., and Clara L. Dubbs of Wichita; three sisters, Mrs. Myrtle Stover of Palo Alto, Calif., Mrs. G.G. Hays of Hutchinson, and Mrs. Raymond Millbrook of Topeka; a brother, Wendell Dubbs of Palo Alto, Calif., two grandsons, Dale and Leon Roat of San Jose, Calif.; a step-daughter, Mrs. Joanne Hatter of Ormond Beach, Fla.; a step-son, James R. Wade of Whitewater; other relatives and many friends.
Funeral services were held from the Ransom United Methodist Church Tuesday afternoon, December 1, with interment made in the Ransom Cemetery with Fitzgeralds in charge.

Ness Co. News, Dec. 3, 1970

OBITUARY

Lewis Albert Dubbs, son of William O. and Florence LaPlante Dubbs, was born April 15, 1893, in Ransom, Kansas, his home town where he resided almost continuously until his death, November 29, 1970.
First born of a family of seven children in a pioneer town, Albert grew up with the community. Always studious, he finished grade school before he was 12 years old, and as a high school senior was Valedictorian of the class of 1913, first class to graduate from Ransom High School.
After graduation from the Kansas State University at Manhattan, where he earned a Pi Kappa Delta key in debate, he taught for several years, being superintendent of schools in Arnold and Beeler, 1921 to 1931.
On June 20, 1921, he married Mary Vaile of Hickman Mills, Mo., whom he had met in college. On the death of his father in 1931, they returned with their two small daughters to live in Ransom. He continued in his home after Mary’s death, June 7, 1965.
Always interested and active in community affairs he enjoyed serving his church, the First Christian Church at Ransom as elder, deacon and Bible school teacher for many years.
Elected to represent Ness County in the Kansas Legislature in 1936 he filled the position of minority floor leader throughout his second term.
Having lost the sight of one eye in 1927 he became completely blind in 1949. This misfortune necessitated severe readjustment in the pattern of his life but he refused to accept it as a handicap. With cheerful determination, he trained himself to use his other senses to compensate for his blindness and was soon an instructor for sightless students in the Kansas Center of the Rehabilitation of the Blind where he had his basic training.
As legislative representative for the Kansas Association for the Blind he attended each session of the state legislature for the past 18 years. He was in demand as a speaker for service clubs on the problems of the blind.
At the time of his death he was serving the state as a member both of the Kansas Hospital Advisory Council and the Advisory Council to the State Library for Services to the Physically Handicapped.
In addition to managing an extensive grain business, Albert was a member of the board of directors of both the First State Bank at Ransom and the First State Bank at Ness City.
His most rewarding civic undertaking was his promotion of the Ransom Nursing Home and Grisell Memorial Hospital at Ransom which resulted in the first rural medical center in western Kansas. His service on the board of these two splendid institutions dates from 1936.
His marriage to Mrs. Opal Wade of Topeka in 1966 brought him a helpmate who supported his efforts in every field of his endeavor. She survives him at their home in Ransom.
He is also survived by his two daughters, Clara Louise Dubbs of Wichita and Mrs. Florence Roat, her husband Roy and two sons, Dale and Leon of San Jose, Calif.; one brother, W.P. Dubbs of Palo Alto, Calif.; his brother-in-law, Donald McMillin of Lamar, Colo.; three sisters, Mrs. Myrtle Stover of Palo Alto, Calif., Minnie Millbrook of Topeka, and Mrs. Agnes Hays of Hutchinson; a step-son, Jim Wade and his family of Whitewater; a step-daughter, Mrs. Joanne Hatter and her husband of Ormond Beach, Fla.; and a wide circle of friends throughout the state.

Ness Co. News, Dec. 18, 1970
 

LOUIS DUBBS

L.B. Dubbs, 97, one of the county’s eldest and most highly respected residents, passed away at the hospital at Ransom Thursday, July 18. He had been in failing health for some months.
Born at Burnt Cabins, Penna., March 6, 1871, he came to the Ransom community with his parents in 1879, and had resided there since.
After reaching manhood on the family homestead northwest of Ransom, he spent a year as a school teacher, and then became associated with the Shellenbergr and Dubbs store in Ransom, clerking there for many years before opening his own store in 1920.
His service to people of his community through the retail operation spanned a period of some 58 years before his retirement.
He was united in marriage with Mollie P. Curtis on March 30, 1897. She passed away on October 26, 1962.
Mr. Dubbs retained an active interest in the affairs of his community well past his retirement age, and served his community over the years in many ways.
He was a member of the Ransom Methodist Church and of the Ransom WCTU.
Survivors include: Two daughters, Mrs. Elizabeth Curry and Mrs. Bertha Whitaker, both of Ransom; a son, Charles E. Dubbs of Kansas City; a brother, Charles F. Dubbs of Ransom; three grandchildren, 11 great-grandchildren, other relatives and many friends.
Funeral services were held from the Ransom Methodist Church Saturday morning, July 20, conducted by the pastor, Rev. William McFall. Interment was in the Ransom Cemetery with Fitzgeralds in charge.

Ness Co. News, July 28, 1968
 

OBITUARY

Louis Burdette Dubbs was born at Burnt Cabins, Penna., March 6, 1871, the elder son of Margaret Elizabeth Aller and Albert M. Dubbs, and passed away at Ransom, July 18, 1968, Ransom’s oldest resident, having passed his 97th birthday by four months and 12 days.
As a child of seven years, Burd with his mother and younger brother, came to Kansas to join his father who had taken a homestead a few miles northwest of Ransom in February of 1879. On that farm, still family owned, he grew to manhood. His memories of the rigors of those pioneer days were pleasant ones, walking across country several miles under a cloudless Kansas sky to visit the nearest neighbor, happy associations in the country school near the Dubbs homestead.
As a young man, he taught one term of school He and his brother, Charles, attended Central Normal college in Great Bend. There he met another young teacher, Mollie Priestly Curtis. They were married March 30, 1897, and established a home in Ransom which endured for more than 65 years, until her death October 26, 1962.
Mr. Dubbs was a Ransom merchant for 58 years, clerking in the Shellenberger and Dubbs store until he opened his own grocery, the L.B. Dubbs Store, in 1920. With the motto “If it isn’t right, we’ll make it right”, he took pride in handling quality produce and enjoyed nothing more than visiting with his customers. His outgoing, cheerful disposition extended a warm welcome to everyone who stepped into his store, the small child with a penny, and the farmer with several cases of eggs.
After the death of his wife, Mr. Dubbs continued to live in the family home in Ransom with his younger brother, Charles F. Dubbs, and his two daughters, Mrs. Netta Curry and Mrs. Bertha Whitaker, whose loving care prolonged his happy years far beyond the span of three score and ten.
In addition to his brother and daughters, he is survived by a son, Charles E. Dubbs, and daughter-in-law, Florence, of Kansas City; three grandchildren, and 11 great-grandchildren.
A faithful member and attendant of Ransom Methodist Church, he taught a Bible Class until advancing years limited his activity. A staunch and vocal advocate of what he believed to be right, he was a long time member of the Prohibition party and the WCTU. He was a candidate for the United States Senate on the Prohibition ticket. The Christian Endeavor society was a major and continuing interest; he and his wife traveled to Chicago and other cities to attend its conventions.
Burd was proud of the community in which he lived, always ready to assume his share of responsibility. He served both as a member of the city council and mayor of Ransom.
He believed in the basic goodness of mankind, regardless of race or religion. His confidence in his fellow man was an inspiration to many. The scores of friends who knew and valued L.B. Dubbs will miss him but not the meaning of his life which is a continuing presence.

Ness Co. News, July 28, 1968
 

MARGARET DUBBS

The entire county was saddened last Friday when it was learned that one of the Pioneer Mothers of Ness County, Mrs. Albert M. Dubbs, had passed away at her home near Ransom.
Mrs. Dubbs had lived in the same house the past 54 years and in recent years her son, Chas. F. Dubbs, had been her mainstay, making his home with her. The other son, L.B. Dubbs, also being with his mother many times every week.
She was widely known over the county as she had always taken an active part in church and community affairs, even in recent years.
Elizabeth Aller was born November 19, 1848, at Knobsville, Penn., one of the ten children of George and Ann Aller, and departed this life at her home near Ransom, on February 23, 1940, at the age of 91 years, 3 months and 3 days.
In 1870 she married Albert M. Dubbs and they established their home at Burnt Cabins, Penn., where their two sons were born. In 1879 the family came to western Kansas and homesteaded west of Ransom. In that neighborhood she lived thruout the remainder of her life, the last 54 years in the same home.
Mrs. Dubbs had the true pioneer spirit, she was able to make the best of hardships and enjoy the good things. She considered it no more than neighborly to walk two or three miles to call upon a new settler. Herself a former teacher, she looked upon the erecting of the sod schoolhouse as the most noteworthy sign of advancement in the pioneer country.
The Dubbs home was noted thruout the country side for its hospitality to both friend and stranger. The best that the home afforded was offered to every visitor for “she stretched out her hand to the poor and reached forth her hands to the needy.”
Mrs. Dubbs became a church member in early life and her long life was full of evidence of Christian living. An outstanding characteristic was her custom of speaking some good for everyone of whom she spoke. “The law of kindness upon her tongue” enabled her to single out the good in all she knew. The love her neighbors, friends and family bore for her, express the goodness of the life she lived.
Her husband preceded her in death in 1927. The two sons, L.B. Dubbs and Chas. F. Dubbs, both of Ransom, survive. Other surviving relatives are her grandchildren, Chas. E. Dubbs of Kansas City, Mo., Mrs. Netta Curry and Mrs. Bertha Mae Guipre of Port Arthur, Texas; her great-grandchildren, Frances Jean and Curtis Rex Guipre, Jack and Joe Curry; her sisters, Mrs. Agnes Gunnell of Crete, Nebr., and Mrs. Myrta McDonald of Ransom, Kansas; her brothers, John Aller of Manchester, Okla., and McClellan Aller of Camp Hill, Penn., and a large number of nieces and nephews.
Funeral services were held Sunday afternoon from the Ransom Methodist Church with the Rev. L.R. Fish in charge. The Rev. Abraham Albrecht of the Mennonite Church assisted with the service. Burial was made in the Ransom Cemetery beside her husband.

Ness Co. News, Feb. 29, 1940
 

MARY DUBBS

Mrs. L.A. Dubbs, 69, a long time Ransom community woman, passed away at the hospital in Ransom on Monday, June 7. She had been in poor health for almost a year.
She was born in Kansas City, Mo., on June 20, 1895. She was a former school teacher, and had resided in the county since 1921.
She married L.A. Dubbs of Ransom at Hickman Mills, Mo., on June 20, 1921. The couple lived their entire wedded life in the Ransom community.
She was a member of the Ransom Methodist Church, the Kansas Association for the Blind, WCTU, and the Monday Evening study club of Ransom.
Survivors include: The widower; two daughters, Clara Dubbs of Wichita, and Mrs. Roy Roat of San Jose, Calif.; a sister, Mrs. Lulu Phelps of Independence, Mo.; a brother, Alan Vaile of Grandview, Mo.; two grandsons, other relatives and many friends.
Funeral services were held from the Ransom Methodist Church on Wednesday morning, June 9, conducted by the pastor Rev. Bruce Blake, and assisted by Rev. P.K. Regier of the Ransom Mennonite Church. Interment was in the Ransom Cemetery with Fitzgeralds in charge.

Ness Co. News, June 10, 1965

OBITUARY

Mary Laura Vaile was born in Kansas City, Mo., June 20, 1895, the youngest child of H.A. and Clara Rodgers Vaile, and died at Ransom, Kansas, her home for 34 years on the morning of June 7, 1965, two weeks before her 70th birthday.
Following her graduation from Kansas State University, she married L.A. Dubbs on June 20, 1921, at Hickman Mills, Mo. The young couple made their first home at Beeler where they taught in the high school. Later they taught at Arnold where their two daughters were born.
Mrs. Dubbs joined the Methodist Church as a young girl and was always active in church work in every community in which she lived. In Ransom she participated in every phase of the work of the Christian Church and was superintendent of the junior department of the Bible School for 15 years. She was an active member and held a number of offices in her garden and study clubs and the WCTU, serving as director of the Child Welfare Department of Kansas for several years.
She loved her garden and her flowers, which grew so profusely under her expert care that she furnished bouquets for many public events as well as bringing joy and comfort to friends and neighbors innumerable.
In spite of the numerous interests which claimed her attention, her life work of chief importance has been in serving as eyes for her husband since he lost his sight in 1939. They traveled extensively while she described to him the countryside through which they passed, or interpreted for him the reference material he needed to study or the reports from the many conventions which they attended. She was always at his side enabling him to see the needed details whether in business, community service or pleasure. She was a life member of the Kansas Association for the Blind and for many years secretary to the board of Grisell Memorial Hospital.
Her later years were brightened by the satisfaction she found in the accomplishments of her daughters and two lively grandsons.
She is survived by her husband of the home, two daughters, Clara Louise of Wichita and Mrs. Florence Roat of San Jose, Calif.; her son-in-law, Roy Roat, two grandsons, Dale and Leon Roat; a sister, Mrs. Lulu Phelps of Independence, Mo.; a brother, Allen Vaile of Grandview, Mo.; a nephew, Harry Phelps of Oakley; and a niece, Mary Carroll of Independence, Mo.

Ness Co. News, June 17, 1965
 

MAURICE DUBBS

Maurice E. Dubbs, 82, near lifelong resident of the Ransom community, passed away at the Grisell Memorial Hospital there Saturday, August 12, 1972, following an apparent heart attack. Although he had been a resident of the Ransom nursing home the past 1 1/2 years, his passing came unexpectedly.
He was born at El Dorado July 19, 1890, and came to the Ransom community in early childhood with his parents, the late Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Dubbs. He married Nellie Rufenacht at Ransom June 16, 1920, and she passed away in November of 1960.
He was a retired farmer and a stockman, and a member of the Ransom church of Christ.
Funeral services were held from the Fitzgerald Funeral Home here Tuesday morning August 15, conducted by Bro. Bill Buggeln, pastor of the Ransom church of Christ and Bro. Lee Lacy of the Utica church of Christ. Interment was in the Ransom Cemetery.
Survivors include two daughters, Mrs. Leslie (Melba) Tillitson of Ransom, and Mrs. Donald (Thelma) Anderson of Wichita; two sisters, Mrs. Roy Gravatt of Selma, Calif., and Mrs. Omer Adkinson of Crowley, Colo.; five grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, other relatives and friends.

Ness Co. News, Aug. 17, 1972

OBITUARY

Maurice E. Dubbs, son of Samuel and Celia Dubbs, was born near El Dorado, on July 19, 1890, and departed this life on August 12, 1972, at the age of 82 years and 24 days.
He was brought as a tiny baby to the family homestead and lived his early days in a sod house. He learned to love the land and as a young boy, he was found taking his place behind the plow to turn the fertile land. To further his educational interest in agriculture, he attended Kansas State college at Manhattan and has spent most of his life in this community as a farmer and stockman.
At the age of 14, Maurice was baptized and became a member of the church of Christ and remained in steadfast faith.
On June 16, 1920, he was united in marriage to Nellie Rufenacht. They celebrated their 40th wedding anniversary just 5 months prior to Nellie’s passing. To this happy home were born two daughters, Thelma and Melba.
In later years he built a new house on his farm, doing most of the building himself. He also enjoyed working with woods, making gifts for his children and grandchildren.
In January, 1970, he suffered a stroke leaving him an invalid. In his passing, he leaves two daughters and their husbands: Thelma and Don Anderson of Wichita, Melba and Leslie Tillitson of Ransom; five grandchildren, two great-grandsons; two sisters and their husbands: Mr. and Mrs. Roy Gravatt of Selma,Calif., and Mr. and Mrs. Omer Adkinson of Crowley, Colo.; and other relatives and many friends.

Ness Co. News, Aug. 24, 1972

MOLLIE DUBBS

Mrs. L.B. Dubbs, 89, a resident of Ransom for over 65 years, passed away at the home in Ransom on Friday, October 26, 1962.
Born in Massac County, Miss., the daughter of the late Dr. and Mrs. D.B. Curtis on October 15, 1873, she came to Kansas with her parents when a small child. Her parents were homesteaders on a farm on the Ness-Trego County line.
Upon reaching womanhood she taught school for several terms.
She was united in marriage to L.B. Dubbs on March 30, 1897. They established their home in Ransom, and had lived their entire wedded life in that city.
She was a member of the Ransom Methodist Church and of the WCTU of that city.
Survivors include the bereaved husband, L.B. Dubbs; two daughters, Mrs. Netta Curry and Mrs. Bertha Whitaker, both of Ransom; one son, Charles E. Dubbs of Kansas City; a sister, Mrs. Helen Miller of Ransom; three grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren, other relatives and a host of friends.
Funeral services were held from the Ransom Methodist Church Sunday afternoon, October 28, conducted by the pastor, Rev. Bruce Blake. Interment was in the Ransom Cemetery with Fitzgerald’s in charge.

Ness Co. News, Nov. 1, 1962
 

OBITUARY

Mollie Priestley Curtis was born October 15, 1873, in Massac County, Ill., one of the 11 children of Dr. and Mrs. David B. Curtis, and passed away at her home in Ransom, Kansas, on October 26, 1962.
As a child of five, she with her twin brother, John, and other members of the large family had the thrilling experience of a covered wagon journey from Illinois to Kansas. For health reasons, Doctor Curtis moved his family from an area where drainage was a problem to a homestead on the Trego-Ness County boundary line. Vivid in her memory were the biscuits and cornbread baked enroute on the kitchen stove installed in the moving wagon and the family cow who walked the long miles behind the wagon furnishing a regular supply of sweet milk.
As a young woman she taught for several years in the schools of Trego County and Ness County and attended Central Normal College in Great Bend. There she became acquainted with a fellow student, L.B. Dubbs. They were married on March 30, 1897, and established a home in Ransom where she resided throughout the 65 years of her married life.
Her husband and her three children, Charles E. Dubbs of Kansas City, Kansas, Mrs. Netta Curry and Mrs. Bertha Whitaker of the home survive her. Also surviving are her youngest sister, Mrs. Lee C. (Helen) Miller of Ransom, three grandchildren, Mrs. Jean LaFon of Okinawa, Joe Curry of Rosemead, Calif., and Jack Curry of Hutchinson; her brother-in-law, Charles F. Dubbs of the home, and 10 great-grandchildren. Other members of her immediate family and a grandson, Curtis Rex Guipre, preceded her in death.
The Methodist Church, the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union, and flowers were the interests on which Mrs. Dubbs centered much of her time and effort. She knew flowers and loved to raise them in the church yard as well as at her own home, and to supply them to innumerable friends and neighbors. Until her later years when illness curtailed her activity, she taught Sunday school class, sponsored the Loyal Temperance Legion and furnished bouquets for countless church and community events. Although shy and retiring by nature she is loved and and remembered by many who benefited by the kindness and concern for others which molded her life.
Rev. Bruce Blake conducted the funeral services from the Ransom Methodist Church with Mrs. Reginald Buxton as soloist and Mrs. Russell Shellenberger as organist. Pallbearers were Edwin Shellenberger, Clyde, Orville, and Wilbur Willour, John Marhofer and Donald Friess. Interment was in Ransom Cemetery.

Ness Co. News, Nov. 1, 1962
 

NELLIE DUBBS

OBITUARY

Nellie Agnes Owens was born at Rio, Illinois, September 9, 1873, and departed this life at her home in Arnold, Kansas, June 3, 1930, aged 56 years, 8 months, and 23 days.
While a small child her parents moved to Iowa. When she was 14 years old, they moved to California where she grew to womanhood.
On May 10, 1893 she was united in marriage to Orra V. Dubbs at Santa Cruz, California. The young couple came to Ransom, Kansas, and have since lived here and at Arnold, except one year spent in Idaho. Eight children were born at Ransom.
When a young woman, she became a member of the church of Christ of which she was still a member.
She was a faithful wife and a devoted mother, and was never too tired to do some service for her family.
Although her sickness extended over a period of several months, she never complained; and when her suffering was most intense she always had a smile for those about her.
She leaves to mourn her passing her husband, O.V. Dubbs, Beth, Owen, and Dale Dubbs, and Vera Huxman of Arnold, Kansas; Dora Tuttle of Jetmore, Kansas, Maye Shertz of McCracken, and Grace Petty, and Ruth Harkness of Ransom, Kansas; two sisters, Mrs. Jennie Ayer of Santa Cruz, California, and Mrs. Grace Streib of Calgary, Canada; three brothers, Art Owens, San Francisco, Clark Owens, Oakland, and Earl Owens, Vallajo, California; nine grandchildren, besides a host of other relatives and many friends.
She was preceded in death by her father, mother, and one brother. Mrs. Dubbs has been in poor health for several years and has suffered much during the last six months. Her daughter Beth has been constantly at her side, besides looking after the home and telephone office also. The other daughters having their own homes were often with their mother, bringing the grandchildren, and the two boys often came to her room.
Although suffering great pain, she always had a kind word and smile for each one.
She was conscious, and knowing the end was near called her little flock about her and told them of her readiness to go, kissing each one goodbye, with a farewell word of love.
She has been faithful to her allotted task, the successful raising of eight children and now hear this, “Well done, good and faithful servant”.

“She took the role of mother in a home,
And here she showed her wondrous charm and grace
She made that home, not common, but sublime;
A bit of heaven here on earth to show,
How men should live to honor God above
Her children call her blessed, and tis so”.

Ransom Record, June 13, 1930
 

NELLIE DUBBS

Mrs. Maurice Dubbs, 69, life-long resident of the Ransom community passed away there on Friday, November 4, after a short illness.
Funeral services were held from the Ransom Mennonite Church Monday, November 7, with interment being made in the Ransom Cemetery.
Survivors include: The husband, Maurice of Ransom; two daughters, Mrs. Melba Tillitson of Ransom, and Mrs. Thelma Anderson of Wichita; her mother, Mrs. Emma Rufenacht of Ransom; six sisters, Mrs. Celia Nimz of Arnold, Mrs. Anna Day of LaJunta, Colo., Mrs. Eva Coopersmith of Rockford, Wash., Mrs. Emma Pierce of Springfield, Colo., Mrs. Ida Todd of Ness City, and Mrs. Eleska Mishler of Ransom; one brother, Fred Rufenacht of Scott City; five grandchildren, other relatives and many friends.

Ness Co. News, Nov. 10, 1960

OBITUARY

Nellie Rose Rufenacht, daughter of Gottfried and Emma Rufenacht, was born on a farm north of Ransom on September 5, 1891, and departed this life at the Grisell Memorial Hospital on November 4, 1960, at the ago of 69 years and 2 months.
At an early age she joined the Mennonite Church at Ransom and continued in steadfast faith until her death.
On June 16, 1920, she was united in marriage to Maurice E. Dubbs. To this union were born two daughters.
Nellie was a devoted wife and mother. She spent her entire life serving her family and church. For the past 25 years she had taught the kindergarten class in Sunday school. Another of her great joys was in sharing her plants and flowers with her friends and neighbors.
She leaves to mourn her passing, her husband, Maurice; her two daughters and their husbands, Thelma and Don Anderson of Wichita, and Melba and Leslie Tillitson of Ransom; five grandchildren, Gwendolyne and Coleen and Ronald, Jeanette, and Vona Jo; her mother, Mrs. Emma Rufenacht; six sisters, Mrs. Celia Nimz of Arnold, Mrs. Anna Day of LaJunta, Colo, Mrs. Eva Coppersmith of Rockford, Wash., Mrs. Emma Pearce of Springfield, Colo., Mrs. Ida Todd of Ness City and Mrs. Eleska Mishler of Ransom; and one brother, Fred Rufenacht of Scott City; and a host of other relatives and friends.

She does not die who leaves her thought
Imprinted on life’s deathless page
She passes on but the work she wrought
Lives on from age to age.

Ness Co. News, Nov. 17, 1960
 

ORRA DUBBS

The many friends of Ora Dubs will be grieved to learn of his death which occurred Tuesday afternoon at the hospital to which place he was brought from his home in Arnold last Thursday after an attack of heart trouble and complications.
The funeral services will be held this Thursday afternoon 1:30 o’clock at the church of Christ in Ransom.

Ransom Record, April 29, 1937
 

REBECCA DUBBS

OBITUARY

Rebecca Lillian Dubbs was born February 14, 1907, at Ransom, Kansas and died August 14, 1931 at Halstead, Kansas at the age of twenty-four years and six months. She leaves her mother, Mrs. W.O. Dubbs, and these brothers and sisters: Wendell, Myrtle, Minnie, Albert and Mary Dubbs, Glenn and Agnes Hayes, Don and Margaret McMillin, and three small nieces. She is with her father, who preceded her to the Great Beyond last February.
Rebecca was Valedictorian of the class of 1924 of Ransom high School. She was graduated from the Kansas State Agricultural College in 1929. In both high school and college she won scholastic honors and took an active part in literary and social affairs.
At the age of nineteen she became a member of the Christian Church.
Her chosen life work was teaching. She had completed two very successful years of work in the high schools of Scott City and Bison.
She was much appreciated in college and teaching for her executive ability. But even more did we appreciate her quiet humor, her cheerfulness, her kindly care for all of us and her Christian way of life as she expressed it in service to all. Although her earthly form has gone from us, her sweet spirit abides.
Funeral services were held at the Methodist Church Monday afternoon, Bro. J.D. Scott, pastor of the Christian Church at Scott City and a personal friend of Rebecca, preaching the sermon.

“It singeth low in every heart,
We hear it, each and all --
A song of those who answer not,
however we may call;
They throng the silence of the breast,
We see then as of yore --
The kind, the brave, the true, the sweet,
Who walk with us no more

‘Tis hard to take the burden up,
When these have laid it down;
They brightened all the joy of life,
They softened every frown;
But o, ‘tis good to think of them,
When we are troubled sore!
Thanks be to God that such have been,
Though they are here no more!

More homelike seems the vast unknown,
Since they have entered there;
To follow them were not so hard,
Wherever they may fare;
They cannot be where God is not,
On any sea or shore;
Whate’er betides, thy love abides,
Our God, forever more!”

Ransom Record, Aug. 21, 1931

SAMUEL DUBBS

OBITUARY

Samuel E. Dubbs, youngest son of Louis and Agnes Dubbs, was born March 15, 1863, in Fulton County, Pa., and died at his home in Ransom, April 13, 1945, less than a month after celebrating his eighty-second birthday anniversary.
Mr. Dubbs was one of those pioneers who have meant so much to western Kansas. At the age of 16, he came with his parents to the newly made dugout home one mile west of the present site of Ransom.
From that April day in 1879 to the morning of his death, this community has been his home. When he reached his majority, he took a homestead for himself in southern Trego County. With his own hands, he built the snug sod house to which he took his bride, Celia Maxwell, following the ceremony in the little Cyrus church on October 28, 1888. In this pioneer sody, their three children were born.
The years were so hard and the crops were so scant, that Mr. Dubbs often went east to work during the harvest season. But he stayed with the west until he saw it blossom with fruitfulness.
On September 18, 1887, he confessed his faith in Christ and was baptized. Through the years he has remained true to his faith and his belief has never changed. Mr. Dubbs earned the respect and love of his friends and neighbors because of his uprightness, integrity, and unswerving adherence to principle. As the shadows of his years lengthened, he was able to say, “I want to be remembered by the life I have lived.”
He is survived by his devoted companion of more than 56 years whose loving care prolonged his life by months and years, and by his three children: Maurice E. of Ransom; Mrs. Alice Gravatt of Selma, Calif.; and Mrs. Mable Adkinson of Crowley, Colo.; by eight grandchildren and two great-grandsons, and by one sister, Mrs. Lillie Traver of Ransom.
The funeral was held at 2:00 Tuesday, April 17, from the Methodist Church in Ransom. Rev. D.N. McAllister of LaCrosse, a personal friend of the deceased, preached the funeral sermon.
Pall bearers were: Ward Scott, Bert Barber, George Shellenberger, Fred Amstutz, Clinton Scherzinger, Charles Miller. A male quartet, Jesse Dieffenbach, Rev. John Boehr, Cliff Anderson, and Charles Shellenberger sang, “The Beautiful Land”, “Going Down the Valley” and “Asleep in Jesus”, accompanied by Eleska Rufenacht.
On account of traffic restrictions, Mrs. Alice Gravatt of California was unable to attend the funeral of her father.

Ness Co. News, Apr. 19, 1945
 

WILLIAM DUBBS

This community was shocked beyond words to learn that one of its most prominent and worthy citizens, W.O. Dubbs, had suddenly passed to the Great Beyond Sunday evening, February 22, 1931, at his home in Ransom. The shock was greater because everyone knew that he had a strong hardy physique and was scarcely ever sick. Mr. Dubbs had been out to his farm west of town, as was his custom, performing his tasks of caring for his stock. He always walked, as he said that he enjoyed the exercise. Upon reaching home he complained of feeling tired. He took his paper, sat down to read, and before his wife, who was with him, could realize that anything was wrong, he had fallen asleep, never to waken on earth. Although this was a shock to his loved ones, and hard to bear, this manner of passing away was in accord with his wishes, as he had expressed to a friend. All that was left for mortal hands to do, was to tenderly care for the earthly temple which had been the dwelling place of this noble man.
The funeral services were held at the Methodist Church Wednesday afternoon, February 25. Every seat, every nook and corner of the large building was filled with sorrowing friends from his own community and from all over the county, and many were standing outside. The seniors of the high school and their sponsors, Miss Scott and Mr. Andree, attended in a body and were given reserved seats. The flowers--words are as inadequate to describe their beauty as is an artists brush to paint the gorgeous sunset. They paid silent but beautiful tribute of respect and sympathy.
Rev. J.K. Shellenberger, Dean of Men, Cotner College, Lincoln, Nebraska, delivered the comforting message. Looking over the large congregation he said that those who filled the church were not there out of curiosity, but had come to pay respect to one “who had loved his fellowmen”.
Miss Fern Horchem at the piano played softly as the quartet, composed of H.C. Anderson, Mrs. Ethel McNinch, Mrs. Lena Sidebottom and Rev. J.W. Bergen sang sympathetically the songs requested, “When My Life’s Work is Ended”, and “True Hearted, Whole Hearted”, both favorites of Mr. Dubbs, and “What a Friend We Have In Jesus”. The pall bearers were three nephews, C.F. Dubbs, L.B. Dubbs and Maurice Dubbs; two sons-in-law, Glen G. Hays and Donald C. McMillin, and a brother-in-law, Isaac LaPlante. The greatest contribution that this man and his wonderful companion have made to their country is their fine family of children, all college graduates excepting Wendell, who will be in college next year, and all doing their part in the life of the community in which they live and work. All were at home for the funeral.
Undertaker John A. Aeby had charge of the body, which was tenderly laid to rest in the Ransom Cemetery, beneath a mound of earth’s rarest beauties--the flowers given in loving remembrance of the departed friend and loved one, and heartfelt sympathy for those who mourn.

”So live, that when thy summons comes to join
The innumerable caravan, which moves
To that mysterious realm where each shall take
His chamber in the silent halls of death,
Thou go not, like the quarry slave at night,
Scourged to his dungeon, but sustained and soothed
By an unfaltering trust, approach thy grave
Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch
About him, and lies down to pleasant dreams.
There is no death! The stars go down
To rise upon some fairer shore;
And bright in Heavens jewelled crown
They shine forever more.
There is no death! An angel form
Walks o’er the earth with silent tread;
He bears our best beloved away
And then we call them “dead”.
********************


 


Announcement of the death of W.O. Dubbs at his home in the west part of the city Sunday was received with sorrow and surprise by this community, for he was one of our oldest residents here, was interested in, and had gone far toward building this town and community.
He was among the first settlers in Nevada Township, coming here in 1879, and was known at all as a man most congenial, upright, and with high ideals.
Up to the hour of his death he had been seemingly in good health, and as usual looked after his daily farm duties. Returning home in the evening from his farm he complained some of not feeling as well as usual. Labored breathing became noticeable to his wife, and she phoned near friends to come in, but before their arrival he had passed quietly away.

OBITUARY

William Orville Dubbs was born in Burnt Cabins, Pennsylvania, August 28, 1854 and died February 22, 1931, at his home in Ransom, Kansas, at the age of 76 years, 6 months and 24 days.
He came to Ness County in April of 1879 and had been a resident of Nevada Township ever since. He endured the hardships of pioneer life with his parents and did not found a home of his own until after the death of his mother.
He was married to Florence E. LaPlante, who survives him, on June 28, 1892. Seven children all of whom are still living came to bless the home these two founded and to be blessed by it. They are L.A. Dubbs, of Beeler, Mrs. G.G. Hays, of Utica, Minnie Dubbs, of Detroit, Michigan, Mrs. D.C. McMillin, of Lamar, Colorado, Myrtle Dubbs, of Detroit, Michigan, Rebecca and Wendell Dubbs, of Ransom.
Three brothers, Isaac, Howard and Albert and one sister, Nora, preceded him to the other shore. He is survived by three sisters, Mrs. Louise Kelly, of Decorum, Pennsylvania, Mrs. Minnie Kelly of Kansas City, Missouri, Mrs. Lillie Traver, of Ransom, and one brother, Samuel E. Dubbs, of Ransom. His late years were brightened by the visits of three granddaughters, Clara Louise and Florence May Dubbs, and Margaret Virginia McMillin.
Throughout the more than half a century that he gave to western Kansas he was always to be found fighting loyally for the right as he saw it. His faith in the abiding goodness of God was as great as it was deep. His last years were blessed with a constantly widening range of interests and a mellowing charity toward all. The hospitality of his home was a benediction to all who partook of it.
His favorite poem, read frequently the last few months was:

Abou Ben Adhem (may his tribe increase!)
Awoke one night from a deep dream of peace,
And saw, within the moonlight in his room,
Making it rich, and like a lily in bloom,
An angel writing in a book of gold:

Exceeding peace had made Ben Adhem bold,
And to the Presence in the room he said,
“What writest thou!” The Vision raised its head,
And with a look made of all sweet accord,
Answered, “The names of those who love the Lord”.
“And is mine one?” said Abou, “Nay, not so,”
Replied the angel. Abou spoke more low,
But cheerily still, and said, “I pray thee, then,
Write me as one who loves his fellow men.”
The Angel wrote, and vanished. The next night
It came again with a great awakening light,
And showed the names whom love of God had blessed,
And, lo! Ben Adhem’s name led all the rest!

Even to the very last his life was blessed with strength to do his daily work and, when evening was come, without pain or struggle, he entered into that greater heritage, “Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch about him and lies down to pleasant dreams.”
J.K. Shellenberger, of Cotner College, Lincoln, Nebraska, gave the sermon. He gave especial expression to rightful and better living here, believing that a right life here would go very far in solving the destiny and future of one in the hereafter. What he offered was finished in expression and bore every evidence of truth, and was well received by his listeners. Possibly the Methodist Church never held so many people.
The flower offering was profuse and came from everywhere, east and west, and from friends at home.
Burial was made at the conclusion of the services in the Ransom Cemetery.

Ransom Record, Feb. 27, 1931
 

CAROL DUFFIELD

Carol Lea Duffield, 47, died Oct. 26, 2000, at her home in Prairie Village.
She was born Oct. 20, 1953, at Ransom, the daughter of Otis and Eunice Tilley Horchem. She attended Fort Hays State University, Penn Valley Community College, Kansas City, Mo, and Johnson County Community College. She was a homemaker.
She married Mike Anderson. On Aug. 8, 1987, she married John Duffield at Leawood. He survives.
Other survivors include: her mother, of Ransom; a brother, David Horchem, Ransom; a sister, Paula Huxman, Leawood; a nephew and a niece.
Private family graveside services and burial will be at 11 a.m. Wednesday in the Ransom Cemetery, with the Rev. Bruce Ferguson presiding.
Memorials may be sent to United Methodist Church, Ransom, in care of Fitzgerald Funeral Home, Ness City.

Hutchinson News, Oct. 29, 2000

Carol Lea Duffield, 47, died Thursday, Oct. 26, 2000, at her home in Prairie Village.
She was born Oct. 20, 1953, in Ransom, to Otis and Eunice (Tilley) Horchem. She married Mike Anderson. Later she married John Duffield on Aug. 8, 1987, in Leawood.
She was a homemaker and member of the Unity Church in Kansas City, Kan. She attended Fort Hays State University, Penn Valley Community College, Kansas City, Mo., and Johnson County Community College.
Survivors include her husband, of the home; her mother; a brother, David Horchem, Ransom; and a sister, Paula Huxman, Leawood.
Private graveside services will be at 11 a.m. Wednesday at the Ransom Cemetery with the Rev. Bruce Ferguson officiating.
Memorials are suggested to the United Methodist Church, Ransom.

Hays Daily News, Oct. 29, 2000

Carol Lea Duffield, 47, died Thursday, October 26, 2000 at her home in Prairie Village.
She was born October 20, 1953, in Ransom to Otis and Eunice (Tilley) Horchem. She married Mike Anderson. Later she married John Duffield August 8, 1987, in Leawood.
She was a homemaker and member of the Unity Church in Kansas City, KS. She attended Fort Hays State University, Penn Valley Community College, Kansas City, MO and Johnson County Community College.
Survivors include her husband, of the home; her mother; a brother, David Horchem, Ransom; and a sister, Paula Huxman, Leawood.
Private graveside services were held Wednesday morning, November 1, at the Ransom Cemetery with the Rev. Bruce Ferguson officiating.
Memorials are suggested to the United Methodist Church, Ransom.

Ness Co. News, Nov. 2, 2000

ELTON DUNCAN

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Laurence Duncan, near Shields, was saddened Saturday afternoon, March 17, by the loss of their infant son, Elton Dale, whose death occurred four hours after his birth. The little body was brought to Ransom Monday afternoon and after a short burial service, conducted by Rev. Mitchell at the grave, was laid to rest in the Ransom Cemetery. The Record joins with the many friends of these young parents in expressions of sympathy for their disappointed hopes. Mrs. Duncan has been quite ill with measles but is thought to be doing as well as could be expected under the sad circumstances.

Ransom Record, March 24, 1927
(Burial unknown location, no information in cemetery records)

JOHN DUNCAN

John Duncan who has farmed for several years in Ness County, was found dead in bed at Garden City Monday forenoon.
Mr. Duncan had sold his farm in Ness County and was moving to Garden City. He had moved some goods into the house at Garden City and the family were to bring the rest of the goods later.
Owing to storms we have few particulars. Mr. Duncan was last seen alive Saturday evening. Monday forenoon he was found dead in bed. Owing to his being a newcomer, there was some delay in notifying relatives. A message reached here on Monday evening. Mr. Aeby, drove to Garden City with the hearse for the remains Wednesday. He was accompanied by Mr. Tony Sweasy. They found bad roads and were stuck several times.
No arrangements have been announced for the funeral as we go to press. Probably it will not be before Friday.
The death certificate gives as cause and time of death; Hemorrhage, some time Saturday night.

Ransom Record, Nov. 14, 1929


 

Word was received in Ransom Monday evening at 8:30 of the death of John Duncan, who until recently lived on a farm near here. Death occurred at Garden City where he was working and expected to move his family soon.

Ransom Record, Nov. 14, 1929

OBITUARY

John Duncan was born in Indiana County, Pennsylvania, October 1, 1871, and departed this life at his home in Garden City, November 9, 1929 at the age of 58 years, 1 month and 9 days. At the age of 7 years he moved with his parents to Idana, Clay County, Kansas. At the age of 24 he was married to Lura Alta Bay of Hopeton, Oklahoma. Eleven children were born to them, two having died in infancy.
For the past 25 years Mr. Duncan has lived with his family in Ness County.
He leaves his wife, four sons, Lawrence of Shields, Kansas, Lloyd of Arizona, Hurley and Carol of Ransom, and five daughters, Mrs. Nellie Petty of Ransom, Mrs. Stella Stieben of Bazine, and Fern, Lola and Ola, of Ransom. Besides these he leaves four grandchildren, one sister, Mrs. Anna Weaver, of Brownell, and three brothers; Homer Duncan of Fort Scott, Kansas, Will Duncan of Santa Ana, California, and Harvey Duncan of Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania; other relatives and a host of friends.

Ransom Record, Nov. 21, 1929

LURA DUNCAN

Mrs. Lura Alta Duncan, 91, formerly of the Ransom community but a resident of Denver, Colo., since 1936, passed away there on Tuesday, October 4.
The body was brought to the Fitzgerald Funeral Home here early Wednesday, October 5.
Fitzgeralds have announced that services have been tentatively set for Saturday, October 8, 2:00 p.m. from the Ransom church of Christ. Interment will be in the Ransom Cemetery.
Survivors include: Five daughters, Mrs. Fern Sonnenberg of Ransom, Mrs. Nellie Petty of Sharon Springs, Mrs. Stella Stieben, Mrs. Lola Steerman and Mrs. Ola Steerman, all of Denver, Colo.; three sons, Carl Duncan of Sharon Springs, Hurley Duncan of Deerfield, and Laurence Duncan of Sunnyside, Wash.

Ness Co. News, Oct. 6, 1966

OBITUARY

Lura Alta Bay, oldest child of Elisha and Clara Bay, was born at Castleton, Kansas, February 20, 1875, and departed this life October 4, 1966, at the home of a daughter in Denver, Colo., at the age of 91 years, 7 months and 14 days.
She was married to John Duncan and to this union were born 11 children.
She was preceded in death by her husband, a son, Lloyd, and two children who died in infancy.
She was a member of the church of Christ.
She is survived by daughters, Nellie Petty, Stella Stieben, Fern Sonnenburg, Ola Steerman and Lola Steerman; sons, Lawrence Duncan, Hurley Duncan and Carl Duncan; 30 grandchildren, 74 great-grandchildren, and one great-great-grandchild; one sister, three brothers, other relatives and friends.
Funeral services were held Saturday, October 8, at 2:00 p.m. from the church of Christ at Ransom. Bro. Roy Lucas of the Utica church of Christ officiated with interment in the Ransom Cemetery.

Ness Co. News, Oct. 20, 1966
 

FLOYD DURR

Floyd Durr, 56, of Ransom passed away of a heart attack at the home there early Wednesday morning, January 29, 1958.
No arrangement for funeral services had been made Wednesday afternoon.
Survivors include the wife; one daughter, Mrs. Dorothy Fabrizius of WaKeeney; two sons, Delbert Durr of Ransom, and Merrill Durr of Ulysses; other relatives and friends.

Ness Co. News, Jan. 30, 1958

OBITUARY

Floyd Gilbert Durr, youngest son of Wesley and Alva Durr, was born on a farm near Holyrood, Kansas, April 2, 1902, and passed away at his home in Ransom, Wednesday morning, January 29, 1958, at the age of 55 years, 9 months, 27 days.
He was united in marriage to Esther Boldt, June 18, 1924, at Bushton, Kansas. To this union were born three children; Merril, Delbert and Dorothy.
In 1924 he was a partner in a garage at Bushton until 1926, when he turned his full attention to farming interests near Bushton and Holyrood.
In 1939 he moved to a farm near Ransom in Ness County, to continue farming. In 1950 he moved to Ransom where he resided until his death.
Floyd, despite his handicap, was active in the community, enjoying life in its fullness and always willing to aid his friends whenever possible for him to do so.
He was a good husband, loving father, and a friend to all. His mother and father and one sister preceded him in death.
He leaves to mourn: His widow, Esther of Ransom; two sons, Merril of Ulysses and Delbert of Ransom; one daughter, Mrs. Dorothy Fabrizius of Harper; two daughters-in-law, one son-in-law, five grandchildren, one brother, Leonard of Holyrood, one sister, Vada Wilson of Salina, a host of relatives and friends.

Ness Co. News, Feb. 6, 1958


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